New NIH Guidelines for Embryonic Stem Cell Research


Melinda Penner evaluates the new NIH guidelines for embryonic stem cell research and this site: here.  It is a very interesting evaluation.

The guidelines allow the use of surplus embryos from in vitro fertilization cycles for the production of embryonic stem cells.  These embryos were originally made for reproductive purposes, but research that will end their existence is allowed on them.  Embryos that were made by somatic cell nuclear transfer are usually made for the purpose of research.  However the guidelines prohibit research on such embryos that were originally made for research.  In others the guidelines allow research on embryos originally not made for research and prohibit funding for research on embryos made for the purpose of research.  In this regard the guidelines are inconsistent.

However, the guidelines seem to regard embryos as expendable.  That creates a society where the weakest members of our species are perpetually at risk.  To justify killing them, we use arguments like “they are going to die anyway.”  Such are argument was used by Scrooge in Charles Dickens “A Christmas Carol.”  When asked for a donation to help the poor at Christmas time, Scrooge said that the poor and homeless should hurry up and die and “decrease the surplus population.”  We would regard such an attitude and inhumane, but when it comes to those who are a little younger than the rest of us, it is somehow perfectly acceptable to destroy them.  I refuse to call such reasoning “moral progress” or such a policy “wise.”

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).