Cultured Smooth Muscle Cells are Formed from Stem Cells


Laboratory research needs tissue as a model system. Smooth muscle is found in the urogenital system, circulatory system, digestive system, and respiratory systems of the human body. Various diseases affect smooth muscle and being able to work on cultured smooth muscle would greatly advance the ability of medical researchers to find treatments for smooth muscle disorders.

To address this need, Cambridge University scientists have devised a protocol for generating different types of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) using cells from patients’ skin. This work could lead to new treatments and better screening for cardiovascular disease.

The Cambridge group used embryonic stem cells and reprogrammed skin cells. Skin cells were turned into induced pluripotent skin cells (iPSCs), which were then differentiated into SMCs. They found that they could create all the major vascular smooth muscle cells in high purity using iPSCs. This technique can also be scaled up to produce clinical-grade SMCs.

The scientists created three subtypes of SMCs from these different types of stem cells. They also showed that various SMC subtypes responded differently when exposed to substances that cause vascular diseases. They concluded that differences in the developmental origin play a role in the susceptibility of SMCs to various diseases. Furthermore, the developmental origin of specific SMCs might part some role in determining where and when common vascular diseases such as aortic aneurysms or atherosclerosis originate.

Alan Colman MD, Principle Investigator of the Institute of Medical Biology at Cambridge University, said: “This is a major advance in vascular disease modeling using patient-derived stem cells. The development of methods to make multiple, distinct smooth muscle subtypes provides tools for scientists to model and understand a greater range of vascular diseases in a culture dish than was previously available.”

Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).