StemCells, Inc. Human Neural Stem Cells Restore Memory in Models of Alzheimer’s Disease


StemCells, Inc., a Newark, California-based company has announced preclinical data that demonstrates that its proprietary human neural stem cell line restored memory and enhanced synaptic function in two animal models that are relevant to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). They presented these data at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2012 in Vancouver, Canada.

In this study, neuroscientists from University of California, Irvine transplanted a neural stem cell line called HuCNS-SC, a proprietary stem cell line made by StemCells and is a purified human neural stem cell line, into a specific region of the brain, the hippocampus in laboratory animals. These injections improved the memories of two different types of laboratory animal that act as AD-significant models. The hippocampus is a portion of the brain that is critically important to the control of memory, and unfortunately, it is severely affected by AD. Specifically, hippocampal synaptic density is reduced in AD and these reductions in synaptic connections are highly correlated with memory loss. After injections of HuCNS-SCs, the animals showed increased synaptic density and improved memory after the cells had been transplanted. Importantly, these results did not require reduction in beta amyloid or tau that accumulate in the brains of patients with AD and account for the pathological hallmarks of the disease.

This research study resulted from collaboration between Frank LaFerla, Ph.D., who is the Director of the University of California, Irvine (UCI) Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders (UCI MIND), and Chancellor’s Professor, Neurobiology and Behavior in the School of Biological Sciences at UCI, and Matthew Blurton-Jones, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Neurobiology and Behavior at UCI.

“This is the first time human neural stem cells have been shown to have a significant effect on memory,” said Dr. LaFerla. “While AD is a diffuse disorder, the data suggest that transplanting these cells into the hippocampus might well benefit patients with Alzheimer’s. We believe the outcomes in these two animal models provide strong rationale to study this approach in the clinic and we wish to thank the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine for the support it has given this promising research.”

Stephen Huhn, M.D., FACS, FAAP, Vice President and Head of the CNS Program at StemCells Inc, added, “While reducing beta amyloid and tau burden is a major focus in AD research, our data is intriguing because we obtained improved memory without a reduction in either of these pathologies. AD is a complex and challenging disorder. The field would benefit from the pursuit of a diverse range of treatment approaches and our neural stem cells now appear to offer a unique and viable contribution in the battle against this devastating disease.”

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).