Increased Flexibility in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivation Might Solve Tumor Concerns


Regenerative medicine depends on stem cells for the promises that it can potentially deliver to ailing patients. Training stem cells to repair injured tissues with custom-grown tissue substitutes and to replace dead cells are some of the goals of regenerative medicine. A major player in regenerative medicine is induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which are made from a patient’s own tissues. Because iPSCs are derived from a patient’s own cells, their chance of being rejected by the patient’s own immune system is rather low. Unfortunately, Shinya Yamanaka’s formula for making iPSCs, for which he was awarded last year’s Nobel Prize, utilizes a strict recipe that uses a precise combination of genes, some of which increase the risk of cancer risk, and, therefore, restricts their full potential for clinical application.

From left: Emmanuel Nivet and Juan Carlos Belmonte. Seated: Ignacio Sancho Martinez. (Source: Salk Institute for Biological Studies)
From left: Emmanuel Nivet and Juan Carlos Belmonte. Seated: Ignacio Sancho Martinez. (Source: Salk Institute for Biological Studies)

However, the laboratory Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte and his colleagues at the Salk Institute have published a paper in the journal Cell Stem Cell that shows that the recipe for iPSCs is much more versatile than originally thought. For the first time, Izpisua Belmonte and his colleague have replaced a gene that was once thought to be impossible to substitute in the production of iPSCs. This creates the potential for more flexible recipes that should speed the adoption of iPSCs for stem cell-based therapies.

Pluripotent stem cells come from two main sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are derived from early human blastocyst-stage embryos. The cells of the inner cell mass are extracted and these immature cells that have never differentiated into specific cell types, and are cultured, grown, and propagated to form an embryonic stem cell line. Secondly, induced pluripotent stem cells or iPSCs, are derived from mature cells that have been reprogrammed back into an undifferentiated state. In 2006 by Yamanaka introduced four different genes into a mature cell to reprogram the cell to pluripotency. This pluripotent cell can be cultured and grown into an iPSCs line. Because of Yamanaka’s initial success in iPSC production, most stem cell researchers adopted his recipe, even though variations on his protocol have been examined and used.

Izpisua Belmonte and his colleagues used a fresh approach for the derivation of iPSCs. They played around with the Yamanka protocol and in doing do discovered that pluripotency (the stem cell’s ability to differentiate into nearly any kind of adult cell) can also be programmed into adult cells by “balancing” the genes required for differentiation. What genes? Those genes that code for “lineage transcription factors,” which are proteins that direct stem cells to differentiate first into a particular cell lineage, or type, such as a blood cell versus a skin cell, and then finally into a specific cell, such as a white blood cell.

“Prior to this series of experiments, most researchers in the field started from the premise that they were trying to impose an ’embryonic-like’ state on mature cells,” says Izpisua Belmonte, who holds the Institute’s Roger Guillemin Chair. “Accordingly, major efforts had focused on the identification of factors that are typical of naturally occurring embryonic stem cells, which would allow or further enhance reprogramming.”

Despite these efforts, there seemed to be no way to determine through genetic identity alone that cells were pluripotent. Instead, pluripotency was routinely evaluated by functional assays. In other words, if it acts like a stem cell, it must be a stem cell.

That condition led the team to their key insight. “Pluripotency does not seem to represent a discrete cellular entity but rather a functional state elicited by a balance between opposite differentiation forces,” says Izpisua Belmonte.

Once they understood this, they realized the four extra genes weren’t necessary for pluripotency. Instead, adult cells could be reprogrammed by altering the balance of “lineage specifiers,” genes that were already in the cell that specified what type of adult tissue a cell might become.

“One of the implications of our findings is that stem cell identity is actually not fixed but rather an equilibrium that can be achieved by multiple different combinations of factors that are not necessarily typical of ESCs,” says Ignacio Sancho-Martinez, one of the first authors of the paper and a postdoctoral researcher in Izpisua Belmonte’s laboratory.

Izpisua Belmonte’s laboratory showed that more than seven additional genes can facilitate reprogramming adult cells to iPSCs. Most importantly, for the first time in human cells, they were able to replace a gene from the original recipe called Oct4, which had been replaced in mouse cells, but was still thought indispensable for the reprogramming of human cells. Their ability to replace it, as well as SOX2, another gene once thought essential that had never been replaced in combination with Oct4, demonstrated that stem cell development must be viewed in an entirely new way. In point of fact, Belmonte’s group showed that genes that specify mesendodermal lineage can replace OCT4 in human iPSC generation, and ectodermal lineage specifiers are able to replace SOX2 in hiPSC generation. Simultaneous replacement of OCT4 and SOX2 allows human cell reprogramming to iPSCs

“It was generally assumed that development led to cell/tissue specification by ‘opening’ certain differentiation doors,” says Emmanuel Nivet, a post-doctoral researcher in Izpisua Belmonte’s laboratory and co-first author of the paper, along with Sancho-Martinez and Nuria Montserrat of the Center for Regenerative Medicine in Barcelona, Spain.

Instead, the successful substitution of both Oct4 and SOX2 shows the opposite. “Pluripotency is like a room with all doors open, in which differentiation is accomplished by ‘closing’ doors,” Nivet says. “Inversely, reprogramming to pluripotency is accomplished by opening doors.”

This work should help to overcome one of the major hurdles in the widespread adoption of iPSC-based therapies; namely, that the original four genes used to reprogram stem cells had been implicated in cancer. “Recent studies in cancer, many of them done by my Salk colleagues, have shown molecular similarities between the proliferation of stem cells and cancer cells, so it is not surprising that oncogenes [genes linked to cancer] would be part of the iPSC recipe,” says Izpisua Belmonte.

With this new method, which allows for a customized recipe, the team hopes to push therapeutic research forward. “Since we have shown that it is possible to replace genes thought essential for reprogramming with several different genes that have not been previously involved in tumorigenesis, it is our hope that this study will enable iPSC research to more quickly translate into the clinic,” says Izpisua Belmonte.

Other researchers on the study were Tomoaki Hishida, Sachin Kumar, Yuriko Hishida, Yun Xia and Concepcion Rodriguez Esteban of the Salk Institute; Laia Miquel and Carme Cortina of the Center of Regenerative Medicine in Barcelona, Spain.

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).