FDA Approves the First Stem Cell Clinical Trial for Multiple Sclerosis


The Tirsch Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Research Center of New York has received Investigational New Drug (IND) approval from the Food and Drug Administration to launch a Phase I trial that uses a patient’s own neural stem cells to treat MS.

MS is a chronic disease that results when a patient’s own immune system attacks the myelin insulation that covers many nerves. This damages the myelin sheath and causes degeneration of the nervous system. Some 2.1 million people worldwide are afflicted with MS.

“To my knowledge, this is the first FDA-approved stem cells trial in the United States to investigate direct injection of stem cells into the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients, and represents an exciting advance in MS research and treatment,” said Saud A. Sadiq, senior research scientist at Tisch and the study’s principal investigator.

The groundbreaking study will evaluate the safety of using stem cells harvested from the patient’s own bone marrow. Once harvested, these stem cells will be injected into the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds the spinal cord in 20 participants who meet the inclusion criteria for this trial.

Since this is a phase 1 study, it is an open safety and tolerability study. The Tisch MS Research Center and affiliated International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice (IMSMP) will host all the activities associated with this study.

The clinical application of autologous neural precursors in MS is the culmination of a decade of stem cell research headed by Sadiq and his colleague Violaine Harris, a research scientist at Tisch.

Preclinical testing found that the injection of these cells seems to decrease inflammation in the brain and may also promote myelin repair and neuroprotection.  In a 2012 publication in the Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Harris and others showed that mesenchymal stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells could promote repair and recovery after intrathecal injection into mice with EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalitis), which is a MS-like disease in mice.  They were able to ascertain that intrathecal injection of mesenchymal stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells significantly correlated with reduced immune cell infiltration in the brain, reduced area of demyelination, and increased number of neural progenitor cells in EAE mice.  This successful preclinical study was the impetus for this clinical trial.

Sadiq said, “This study exemplifies the Tisch MS Research Center’s dedication to translational research and provides a hope that established disability may be reversed in MS.” All study participants will undergo a single bone marrow collection procedure, from which mesenchymal stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells (MSC-NPs) will be isolated. expanded, and tested prior to injection.

All patients will receive three rounds of injections at three-month intervals. Safety and efficacy parameters will be evaluated in all trial participants throughout their regular visits with their attending physicians.

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).