Culture Medium from Endothelial Progenitor Cells Heals Hearts


Endothelial Progenitor Cells or EPCs have the capacity to make new blood vessels but they also produce a cocktail of healing molecules. EPCs typically come from bone marrow, but they can also be isolated from circulating blood, and a few other sources.

The laboratory of Noel Caplice at the Center for Research in Vascular Biology in Dublin, Ireland, has grown EPCs in culture and shown that they make a variety of molecules useful to organ and tissue repair. For example, in 2008 Caplice published a paper in the journal Stem Cells and Development in workers in his lab showed that injection of EPCs into the hearts of pigs after a heart attack increased the mass of the heat muscle and that this increase in heart muscle was due to a molecule secreted by the EPCs called TGF-beta1 (see Doyle B, et al., Stem Cells Dev. 2008 Oct;17(5):941-51).

In other experiments, Caplice and his colleagues showed that the culture medium of EPCs grown in the laboratory contained a growth factor called “insulin-like growth factor-1” or IGF1. IGF1 is known to play an important role in the healing of the heart after a heart attack. Therefore, Caplice and his colleagues tried to determine if IGF1 was one of the main reasons EPCs heal the heart.

To test the efficacy of IGF1 from cultured EPCs, Caplice’s team grew EPCs in the laboratory and took the culture medium and tested the ability of this culture medium to stave off death in oxygen-starved heart muscle cells in culture. Sure enough, the EPC-conditioned culture medium prevented heart muscle cells from dying as a result of a lack of oxygen.

When they checked to see if IGF1 was present in the medium, it certainly was. IGF1 is known to induce the activity of a protein called “Akt” inside cells once they bind IGF1. The heart muscle cells clearly had activated their Akt proteins, thus strongly indicating the presence of IGF1 in the culture medium. Next they used an antibody that specifically binds to IGF1 and prevents it from binding to the surface of the heart muscle cells. When they added this antibody to the conditioned medium, it completely abrogated any effects of IGF1. This definitively demonstrates that IGF1 in the culture medium is responsible for its effects on heart muscle cells.

Will this conditioned medium work in a laboratory animal? The answer is yes. After inducing a heart attack, injection of the conditioned medium into the heart decreased the amount of cell death in the heart and increased the number of heart muscle cells in the infarct zone, and increased heart function when examined eight weeks after the heart attacks were induced. The density of blood vessels in the area of the infarct also increased as a result of injecting IGF1. All of these effects were abrogated by co-injection of the antibody that specifically binds IGF1.

From this study Caplice summarized that very small amounts of IGF1 (picogram quantities in fact) administered into the heart have potent acute and chronic beneficial effects when introduced into the heart after a heart attack.

These data are good enough grounds for proposing clinical studies. Hopefully we will see some in the near future.

Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).