Treating Crohn’s Disease Fistulas with Fat Stem Cells


All of us have probably heard of Crohn’s disease or have probably known someone with Crohn’s disease. While the severity of this disease varies from patient to patient, some people with Crohn’s disease simply cannot get a break.

Crohn’s disease is one of a group of diseases known as IBDs or “Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.” IBDs include Crohn;s disease, which can affect either the small or large intestine and rarely the esophagus and mouth, ulcerative colitis, which is restricted to the large intestine, and other rarer types of IBDs known that include Collagenous colitis, Lymphocytic colitis, Ischaemic colitis, Diversion colitis, Behçet’s disease, and Indeterminate colitis.

Crohn’s disease (CD) involves the patient’s immune system attacking the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, which leads to chronic inflammation within the bowel. While the exact mechanism by which this disease works is still not completely understood and robustly debated, Crohn’s disease was originally thought to be an autoimmune disease in which the immune system recognizes some kind of surface protein in the gastrointestinal tract as foreign and then attacks it. However, genetic studies of CD, linked with clinical and immunological studies have shown that this is not the case. Instead, CD seems to be due to a poor innate immunity so that the bowel has an accumulation of intestinal contents that breach the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in chronic inflammation. A seminal paper by Daniel Marks and others in the Lancet in 2006 provided hard evidence that this is the case. When Marks and others tested the white blood cells from CD patients and their ability to react to foreign invaders, those cells were sluggish and relatively ineffective. Therefore, Crohn’s seems to be an overactivity of the acquired immunity to make up for poor innate immunity.

Given all that, one of the biggest, most painful consequences of CD are anal fistulas. If those sound painful it’s because they are. A fistula is a connection between to linings in your body that should not normally be connected. In CD patients, the anus and the attached rectum get kicked about by excessive inflammation and tears occur. These tears heal, but the healing can cause connections between linings that previously did not exist. Therefore fecal material not comes out of the body in more than one place. Sounds disgusting? It gets worse. Those areas that leak feces are not subject to extensive pus formation and they must be fixed surgically. But how do you fix something that is constantly inflamed? It’s an ongoing problem in medicine.

Enter stem cells to the rescue, maybe. In Spain, a multicenter clinical study has just been published that shows that fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells might provide a better way to treat these fistulas in CD patients. Mesenchymal stem cells have the ability to suppress inflammation, and for that reason, they are excellent candidates to accelerate healing in cases such as these.

Galindo and his group took 24 CD patients who had at least one draining fistula (yes, some have more than one) and gave them 20 million fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells. These cells were extracted from someone else, which is an important fact, since liposuction procedures on these patients might have added to their already surfeit of inflammation.

For this treatment, the cells were administered directly on the lesion, which is almost certainly important. If the closing of the fistula was incomplete after 12 weeks, then the patients were given another dose of 40 million fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells right on the lesion. All these patients were followed until week 24 after the initial stem cell administration.

The results were very hopeful. There were no major adverse effects six months after the stem cell treatment. This is a result seen over and over with mesenchymal stem cells – they are pretty safe when administered properly. Secondly, full analysis the data showed that at week 24 69.2% of the patients showed a reduction in the number of draining fistulas. Even more remarkably, 56.3% of the patients achieved complete closure of the treated fistula. That is just over half. Also, 30% of the cases showed complete closure of all existing fistulas. These results are exciting when you consider the criteria they used for complete closure: absence of draining pus through its former opening. complete “re-epithelization” of the tissue, which means that the lining of the tissue is healed, looks normal and is properly attached to the proper neighbors, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) scans of the region must look normal. For these patients, the MRI “Score of Severity,” which is a measure of the structural abnormality of the anal region, showed statistically significant reductions at week 12 with a marked reduction at week 24. Folks that’s good news.

Galindo interprets his results cautiously and notes that this is a small study, which is true. He also states that the goal of this study was to ascertain the safety of this technique, and when it comes to safety, this technique is certainly safe. When it comes to efficacy, another larger study is required that specifically examined the efficacy of this technique. Galindo is, of course, quite correct, but this is certainly a very exciting result, and hopefully these cells will get further chances to “strut their therapeutic stuff.”

See de la Portilla F, et al Expanded allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells (eASCs) for the treatment of complex perianal fistula in Crohn’s disease: results from a multicenter phase I/IIa clinical trial.  Int J Colorectal Dis. 2013 Mar;28(3):313-23. doi: 10.1007/s00384-012-1581-9. Epub 2012 Sep 29.

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).