The Use of Synthetic Messenger RNAs Augment Heart Regeneration and Healing After a Heart Attack


A collaborative effect between researchers at Harvard University and Karolinska Institutet has shown that the application of particular factors to the heart after a heart attack can heal the heart and induce the production of new heart muscle.

Kenneth Chien, who has a dual appointment at the medical university Karolinska Institutet and Harvard University, led this research teams said this about this work: “This is the beginning of using the heart as a factory to produce growth factors for specific families of cardiovascular stem cells, and suggests that it may be possible to generate new heart parts without delivering any new cells to the heart itself.”

This study builds upon previous work by Chien and his colleagues in which the growth factor VEGFA, which is known to activate the growth of endothelial cells in the adult heart (endothelial cells line blood vessels), also serves as a switch that converts heart stem cells away from making heart muscle to forming coronary vessels in the fetal heart.

To drive the expression of VEGFA in the heart, Chien and others made synthetic messenger RNAs that encoded VEGFA and injected them into the heart cells. Injections of these synthetic VEGFA messenger RNAs produced a short burst of VEGFA.

Chien induced a heart attack in mice and then administered the synthetic VEGFA messenger RNAs to some mice and buffer to others 48 hours after the heart attacks. Chien and his crew was sure to inject the synthetic VEGFA mRNAs into the regions of the heart known to harbor the resident cardiac stem cell populations.

Not only did the VEGFA-mRNA-injected mice survive better than the other mice, but their hearts had smaller heart scars, and had clear signs of the growth of new heart muscle that had been made by the resident cardiac stem cell populations. One pulse of VEGFA had long-term benefits and those cells that would have normally made the heart scar ended up making heart muscle instead as a result of one pulse of VEGFA.

Chien said of this experiment, “This moves us very close to clinical studies to regenerate cardiovascular tissue with a single chemical agent without the need for injecting any additional cells into the heart.”

At the same time, Chien also noted that this technology is in the early stages of development. Even though these mice had their chests cracked open and their hearts injected, for human patients, the challenge is to adapt heart catheter technologies to the delivery of synthetic messenger RNAs. Also, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of this technology to humans, Chien and others will need to repeat these experiments in larger animals that serve as a better model system for the human heart than rodents. Chien’s laboratory is presently in the process of doing that.

To adapt catheter technology to deliver these reagents, Chien had co-founded a company called Moderna Therapeutics to research this problem and develop the proper platform technology for clinical use. Chien is also collaborating with the biotechnology company AstraZeneca to help expedite moving the synthetic RNA technology into a clinical setting.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).