Faulty Stem Cell Regulation Contributes to Down Syndrome Deficits


People who have three copies of chromosome 21 have a genetic condition known as Down Syndrome (DS). In particular, patients who have an extra copy of a small portion of chromosome 21 (q22.13–q22.2) known as the Down Syndrome Critical Region or DSCR have the symptoms of DS. The DSCR contains at least 30 genes or so and some of them tightly correlate to the pathology of DS. For example, the APP (amyloid protein precursor) gene accounts for the accumulation of amyloid protein in the brains of DS patients. DS patients develop Alzheimer disease-like pathology by the fourth decade of life, and the APP protein is overexpressed in the adult Down syndrome brain. Another gene found in the DSCR called DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) encodes a member of the dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase family and this protein participates in various cellular processes. Overproduction of DYRK1A seems to cause the abnormal brain development observed in DS babies.

Another gene found in the DSCR is called USP16 and this gene encodes a protein that removes small peptides called ubiquitin from other proteins. Ubiquitin attachment marks a protein for degradation, but it can also mark a protein to do a specific job. USP16 removes ubiquitin an either stops the protein from acting or prevents the proteins from being degraded. Overexpression of UPS16 occurs in DS patients, and too much UPS16 protein affects stem cell function.

Michael Clarke, professor of cancer biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, said, “There appear to be defects in the stem cells in all the tissues we tested, including the brain.” Clarke continued, “We believe USP16 overexpression is a major contributor to the neurological deficits seen in Down Syndrome.” Clarke’s laboratory conducted their experiments in mouse and human cells.

Additional work by Clarke and his colleagues showed that downregulation of USP16 partially rescues the stem cell proliferation defects found in DS patients.

Clarke’s study suggests that drugs that reduce the activity of USP16 could reduce the some of the most profound deficits in DS patients.

This paper also details some of the pathological mechanisms of DS. DS patients age faster and exhibit early Alzheimer’s disease. The reason for this seems to rely on the overexpression of UPS16, which accelerates the rate at which stem cells are used during early development. This accelerated rate of stem cell use burns out and exhausts the stem cell reserves and, consequently, the brains age faster and are susceptible to the early onset of neurodegenerative diseases.

After examining laboratory mice that had a rodent form of DS, Clarke and his coworkers turned their attention to USP16 overexpression in human cells. Clarke collaborated with a Stanford University neurosurgeon named Samuel Cheshier and their study showed that skin cells from normal volunteers grew much more slowly when the Usp16 gene was overexpressed. Furthermore, neural stem cells, which normally clump into little balls of cells called neurospheres, no longer formed these structures when Usp16 was overexpressed in them.

a, Proliferation analysis, as well as SA-βgal and p16Ink4a staining, of three control and four Down’s syndrome (DS) human fibroblast cultures show growth impairment and senescence of Down’s syndrome cells. b, c, Lentiviral-induced overexpression of USP16 decreases the proliferation of two different control fibroblast lines (b), whereas downregulation of USP16 in Down’s syndrome fibroblasts promotes proliferation (c). d, Overexpression of USP16 reduces the formation of neurospheres derived from human adult SVZ cells. The right panel quantifies the number of spheres in the first and second passages. P < 0.0001. All the experiments were replicated at least twice. Luc, luciferase.
a, Proliferation analysis, as well as SA-βgal and p16Ink4a staining, of three control and four Down’s syndrome (DS) human fibroblast cultures show growth impairment and senescence of Down’s syndrome cells. b, c, Lentiviral-induced overexpression of USP16 decreases the proliferation of two different control fibroblast lines (b), whereas downregulation of USP16 in Down’s syndrome fibroblasts promotes proliferation (c). d, Overexpression of USP16 reduces the formation of neurospheres derived from human adult SVZ cells. The right panel quantifies the number of spheres in the first and second passages. P < 0.0001. All the experiments were replicated at least twice. Luc, luciferase.

Conversely, when cultured cells from DS patients had their USP16 activity levels knocked down, their proliferation defects disappeared. In Clarke’s words, “This gene is clearly regulating processes that are central to aging in mice and humans, and stem cells are severely compromised. Reducing Usp16 expression gives an unambiguous rescue at the stem cell level. The fact that it’s also involved in this human disorder highlights how critical stem cells are to our well-being.”

Advertisements

Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).