Tendon Stem Cells to Repair Torn Tendons


The Australian regenerative medicine company Orthocell Limited has announced the results of their recent clinical trial in which a patented Orthocell stem cell technology was used to repair torn tendons.

Tendon injuries are one of the most common causes of occupational- and sports-related disabilities. Current clinical treatments are not terribly effective. Orthocell’s new technique, autologous tenocyte implantation (Ortho-ATIT) uses biopsies of healthy tendons, isolation and cultivation of tendon stem cells (tenocytes), and re-injection of those cells into the injured tendon. The injection process takes about 20 minutes and is less invasive than surgery.

Tenocytes
Tenocytes

The data from this clinical trial confirm that Ortho-ATIT is safe and effective at relieving pain and repairing tendon injuries. The patients in this study had failed at least one previous therapy, including physiotherapy and corticosteroid injections. However as a result of being treated with Ortho-ATIT, patients achieved significant improvement in tendon function and structural integrity.

Orthocell Managing Director Paul Anderson said that the clinical study indicates great potential for the Ortho-ATIT stem cell-based tendon repair technology.

Anderson said, “We are now focusing our efforts on offering this world class treatment more widely to patients throughout Australasia, and we are also investigating new potential markets overseas.”

Ortho-ATIT is the result of over 10 years of research and development by Professor Ming Hao Zheng‘s research group at the Centre for Translational Orthopaedic Research at the University of Western Australia.

Amanda Redwood, a 45-year old mother of two children who participated in this clinical trial said that Ortho-ATIT relieved her severe elbow pain within six months. Redwood said, “I experienced debilitating symptoms of tennis elbow for more than 16 months before I had the procedure. Within six weeks of the injection the pain started to subside and within 6 months it was gone.”

Ortho-ATIT has been approved by the Therapeutics Good Administration (TGA) in Australia. The technology is available to patients in Australasia who have failed conservative treatment.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).