Stem Cell Treatments to Improve Blood Flow in Angina Patients


Angina pectoris is defined as chest pain or discomfort that results from poor blood flow through the blood vessels in the heart and is usually activated by activity or stress.

In Los Angeles, California, physicians have initiated a double-blind, multicenter Phase III clinical trial that uses a patient’s own blood-derived stem cells to restore circulation to the heart of angina patients.

This procedure utilizes state-of-the-art imaging technology to map the heart and generate a three-dimensional image of the heart. These sophisticated images will guide the physicians as they inject stem cells into targeted sites in the heart.

This is a double-blinded study, which means that neither the patients nor the researcher will know who is receiving stem-cell injections and who is receiving the placebo.

The institution at which this study is being conducted, University of Los Angeles (UCLA), is attempting to establish evidence for a stem cell treatment that might be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for patients with refractory angina. The subjects in this study had received the standard types of care but did not receive relief. Therefore by enrolling in this trial, these patients had nothing to lose.

Dr. Ali Nasir, assistant professor of cardiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine and co-principal investigator of this study, said: “We’re hoping to offer patients who have no other options a treatment that will alleviate their severe chest pain and improve their quality of life.”

Before injecting the stem cells or the placebo, the team examined the three-dimensional image of the heart and ascertained the health of the heart muscle and voltage it generated. Damaged areas of the heart fail to produce adequate quantities of voltage and show low levels of energy.

Jonathan Tobis, clinical professor of cardiology and director of interventional cardiology research at Geffen School of Medicine, said: “We are able to tell by the voltage levels and motion which area of the [heart] muscle is scarred or abnormal and not getting enough blood and oxygen. We then targeted the injections to the areas just adjacent to the scarred and abnormal heart muscle to try to restore some of the blood flow.”

What did they inject? The UCLA team extracted bone marrow from the pelvic bones and isolated CD34+ cells. CD34 refers to a cell surface protein that is found on bone marrow stem cells and mediates the adhesion of bone marrow stem cells to the bone marrow matrix. It is found on the surfaces of hematopoietic stem cells, placental cells, a subset of mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and endothelial cells of blood vessels. These are not the only cells that express this cell surface protein, but it does list the important cells for our purposes. Once the CD34+ cells were isolated, the were injected into the heart through a catheter that was inserted into a vein in the groin.

CD34

The team hopes that these cells (a mixture of mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and endothelial progenitor cells) will stimulate the growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in the heart, and improve blood flow and oxygen delivery to the heart muscle.

“We will be tracking patients to see how they’re doing,” said William Suh MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine in the division of cardiology at Geffen School of Medicine.

The goal of this study is to enroll 444 patients nation-wide, of which 222 will receive the stem cell treatment, 111 will receive the placebo, and 111 who will be given standard heart care.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).