Adult Stem Cells Used for Spinal Disc Repair


The Australian regenerative medicine company Mesoblast Limited announced the results of their 12-month clinical trial that examined the use of their “off-the-shelf” product to treat patients with disc-related low back pain.

This phase 2 clinical trial enrolled 100 patients with chronic moderate to severe “discogenic low back pain” and tested the ability of “mesenchymal precursor cells” to shore up degenerating intervertebral discs.

Intervertebral discs

Intervertebral discs sit between each vertebra and act as shock absorbers. Each disc consist of an outer layer called the “annulus fibrosus.” The annulus fibrosus consists of several layers of fibrocartilage. The annulus fibrosus surrounds an inner layer called the nucleus pulposus, which contains loose fibers suspended in a mucoprotein gel with the consistency of jelly. This jelly-like center distributes pressure evenly across the disc. These discs absorb the impact of the body’s daily activities and keep the two vertebrae separated. The development of a prolapsed disc results when the jelly in the nucleus pulposus is forced out of the doughnut/disc, which may put pressure on the nerve located near the disc.

Intervertebral structure

More than six million people in the United States alone deal with chronic back pain that has persisted for at least three months, and 3.5 million people are affected by moderate or severe degenerative intervertebral disc disease.

In this clinical trial, Mesoblast Limited injected their mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) into the degenerating intervertebral discs of patients suffering from moderate to severe back pain. When compared with a control group, patients who received the MPC injections used less pain killers, went through fewer surgeries and non-surgical interventions, and had greater disc stability as ascertained by X-rays. MPC injections also were well tolerated and produced few side effects.

This phase 2 clinical trial extends earlier observations by Mesoblast Limited on laboratory animals. In preclinical trials, purified MPCs increased the quality of the jelly content of the nucleus pulposus and improved disc structure in sheep.

This present study enrolled 100 patients at 13 different sites across Australia and the United States with early disc degeneration and randomly assigned the subjects to one of four groups: 1) those who received saline injections; 2) those who received hyaluronic acid injections; 3) those who received low-dose MPCs in hyaluronic acid; and 4) those who received high-dose injections of MPCs in hyaluronic acid.

All patients received their injections in an outpatient procedure, and are being evaluated for safety and efficacy to evaluate long-term treatment effects.

At 12 months, the key findings were improvement in chronic low back pain, function, and disc stability. Also, no safety concerns emerged as a result of the treatment.

As this trial proceeds, more data should be forthcoming.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).