Taiwanese Group Identifies Stem Cell-Based Drug to Rejuvenate Aged Hearts


A southern Taiwan-based National Cheng Kung University research team led by Patrick Ching-Ho Hsieh has discovered that a molecule called prostaglandin E2 can regenerate aged hearts in rodents.

This discovery provides a useful new perspective on heart regeneration and presents an effective option for heart disease patients other than heart transplant.

According to Hsieh, congestive heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. There are some six million patients with congestive heart failure in the US alone and some 400,000 in Taiwan. Despite intensive drug, surgical and other medical interventions, 80 percent of all heart patients die within 8 years of diagnosis.

Even though several experiments and clinical trials have established that heart regeneration can take place, the means by which the heart regenerates is still not completely clear, and there are also no drugs to stimulate heart regeneration by the resident stem cell population in the heart.

Now, after seven years of hard work, Hsieh’s team has identified the critical time period and the essential player that directs heart repair.

Hsieh and his colleagues used genetically engineered mice that Hsieh had developed as a postdoctoral research fellow at Harvard Medical School. By using this transgenic mouse strain, Hsieh and others showed that the self-repair process of the heart begins 7 days after injury and peaks at 10 days after injury.

The “director” of this self-repair process is the molecule PGE2. PGE2 regulates heart-specific stem cell activities.

PGE2

“More importantly, both young and old mice have significant improvements for cardiac remodeling if you treat both of them [with] PGE2,” said Hsieh.

Hsieh’s team also established that PGE2 decreases expression of a gene associated with aging, TGF-beta1. PGE2 also rejuvenates the micro-environment of the aged cells, according to Hsieh.

Advertisements

Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).