Placenta-Based Stem Cells Increasing Healing of Damaged Tendons in Laboratory Animals


Pluristem Therapuetics, a regenerative therapy company based in Haifa, Israel, has used placenta-based stem cells to treat animal with tendon damage, and the results of this preclinical study were announced at a poster presentation at the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’ (AAOS) annual meeting in New Orleans.

Dr. Scott Rodeo of New York’s Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) is the principal investigator for this preclinical trial. His poster session showed placental-based stem cells that were grown in culture and applied to damaged tendons seemed to have an early beneficial effect on tendon healing. In this experiment, animal tendons were injured by treatments with the enzyme collagenase. This enzyme degrades tendon-specific molecules and generates tendon damage, which provides an excellent model for tendon damage in laboratory animals. These placenta-based cells are not rejected by the immune system and can also be efficiently expanded in culture. The potential for “off-the-shelf” use of these cells is attractive but additional preclinical studies are necessary to understand how these cells actually help heal damaged tendons and affect tendon repair.

“Although our findings should be considered preliminary, adherent stromal cells derived from human placenta appear promising as a readily available cell source to aid tendon healing and regeneration,” stated Dr. Rodeo.

“These detailed preclinical results, as well as the favorable top-line results we announced from our Phase I/II muscle injury study in January, both validate our strategy to pursue advanced clinical studies of our PLX cells for the sports and orthopedic market,” stated Pluristem CEO Zami Aberman.

Dr. Rodeo and his orthopedic research team at HSS studied the effects of PLX-PAD cells, which stands for PLacental eXpanded cells in a preclinical model of tendons around the knee that had sustained collagenase-induced injuries. Favorable results from the study were announced by Pluristem on August 14, 2013. Interestingly, Dr. Rodeo, the Principal Investigator for this study is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College; Co-Chief of the Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service at HSS; Associate Team Physician for the New York Giants Football Team; and Physician for the U.S.A. Olympic Swim Team.

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).