Pluristem’s Phase I/II Muscle Injury Trial Shows that Placental Stem Cells Augment Muscle Healing After Surgery


Pluristem Therapeutics Inc. a leading developer of placenta-based cell therapies, has announced top-line results from its Phase I/II clinical trial that accesses the safety and efficacy of PLacental eXpanded (PLX-PAD) cells in the treatment of muscle injury. This clinical trial showed that PLX-PAD cells were safe and effective. These results provide evidence that PLX cells may be efficacious in the treatment of orthopedic injuries including muscles and tendons.

This Phase I/II trial was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study conducted at the Orthopedic Clinic of the Charité University Medical School under the auspices of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institute (PEI), Germany’s health authority. The injured muscle studied was the gluteus medius muscle in the buttock. Hip-replacement patients undergo a surgical procedure that injuries the gluteus medius muscle healing of this muscle after hip replacement surgery is crucial for joint stability and function.

Gluteal Muscles

The 20 patients in the study were randomized into three treatment groups. Each patient received an injection in the gluteal muscle that had been traumatized during surgery. One group was treated with 150 million PLX-PAD cells per dose (n=7), the second was administered 300 million PLX-PAD cells per dose (n=6), and the third received placebo (n=7).

The primary safety endpoint was clearly met since no serious adverse events were reported at either dose level. The study showed that PLX-PAD cells were safe and well tolerated.

The primary efficacy endpoint of the study (how well the stem cells worked) was the change in maximal voluntary isometric contraction force of the gluteal muscle at six months after surgery. Efficacy was shown in both PLX-PAD-treated patient groups. The group that received a dose of 150 million cells showed a statistically significant 500% improvement over the placebo group in the change of the maximal contraction force of the gluteal muscle (p=0.0067). Patients who received the lower dose (300 million cells) showed a 300% improvement over the placebo (p=0.18).

An analysis of the overall structure of the gluteal muscle using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated an increase in muscle volume in those patients treated with PLX-PAD cells versus the placebo group. The patients who had received the 150 million cell dose displayed a statistically significant superiority over the placebo group. Patients treated at the 150 million cell dose showed an approximate 300% improvement over the placebo in the analysis of muscle volume (p=0.004). Patients treated at the 300 million cell dose showed an approximate 150% improvement over the placebo in the change of muscle volume (p=0.19).

The study’s Senior Scientist, Dr. Tobias Winkler of the Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Julius Wolff Institute Berlin, Charité – Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Germany, commented, “I am very impressed with the magnitude of the efficacy results seen in this trial. PLX cells demonstrated safety and suggested that the increase in muscle volume could be a mechanism for the improvement of contraction force.”

Zami Aberman Chairman and CEO stated, “This was a very important study not only for Pluristem but for the cell therapy industry in general. The study confirms our pre-clinical findings that PLX-PAD cell therapy can be effective in treating muscle injury. Having a statistically significant result for our primary efficacy endpoint is very encouraging and consistent with our understanding of the mechanism of action associated with cell therapy. Based on these results, we intend to move forward with implementing our strategy towards using PLX cells in orthopedic indications and muscle trauma.”

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).