New Method Derived Skeletal Muscle Cells from Pluripotent Stem Cells


A University of Wisconsin research team led by Masatoshi Suzuki has devised a new protocol for the production of large quantities of skeletal muscle cells from pluripotent stem cells.

Suzuki and his team used embryonic stem cells lines and induced pluripotent stem cells to generate large quantities of muscles and muscle progenitor.

Suzuki adapted a technique used to make brain cells to derive his muscle cells in culture. He grew the stem cells as floating spheres in high concentrations of two growth factors: fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This combination of growth factors directed the stem cells to differentiate into skeletal muscle cells and muscle progenitors.

To replace damaged or diseased muscles in the clinic, physicians will require large quantities of muscle cells. Therefore, there was an ardent search to design a technique that was efficient, but also fast and relatively simple. Even though several protocols have been devised to differentiate pluripotent stem cells into muscle cells, not all of these protocols are practical for clinical use. For example, some protocols are simply too cumbersome for clinical use. Still others make use of genetically engineered cells that have not been approved for clinical use.

Earlier, Suzuki transplanted lab-engineered skeletal muscle into mice that had a form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These animals had better muscle function and survived better than the control animals.

The muscle progenitors generated in Suzuki’s laboratory could potentially play a similar role in human patients with Lou Gehring’s disease. Suzuki’s method can grow muscle progenitor cells, which can grow in culture, from induced pluripotent stem cells, which are derived from the patient’s own cells. Such cells could be used as a model system to study the efficacy of particular treatments on the patient’s muscles, or they could be used to treat patients who have muscle defects.

“Our protocol can work in multiple ways and so we hope to provide a resource for people who are exploring specific neuromuscular diseases in the laboratory,” said Suzuki.

The advantages of Suzuki’s protocol are manifold. First, the cells are grown in a defined medium devoid of animal products. Secondly, the stem cells are grown as spheres, and these grow faster when grown as spheres than they do with other techniques. Third, 40-60 percent of the cells grown in this culture system differentiate into skeletal muscle cells or muscle progenitor cells. This is a very high proportion of muscle cells when compared to other protocols.

Suzuki hopes that by toying with the culture system, he and his colleagues can increase this proportion of muscle cells that form from the initial stem cell culture. This would enhance the potential of using these cells for clinical purposes.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).