Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells Aid Kidney Transplantation Success in a Pig Model


When a kidney patient receives a new kidney, the donated kidney undergoes a brief loss of blood supply followed by a restoration of the blood supply. This phenomenon is called ischemia/reperfusion (IR), and IR tends to cause cell death, followed by rather extensive scarring. Tissue scarring is called tissue fibrosis and a scarred kidney can lead to so-called transplant dysfunction, which means that the transplanted kidney does not work terrible well, and this can cause transplant failure.

Previous studies in laboratory rodents have shown that mesenchymal stem cells from amniotic fluid (afMSCs) are beneficial in protecting against transplant-induced fibrosis (Perin L, et al. PLoS One 2010;5:e9357; Hauser PV, et al. Am J Pathol 2010;177:2011-2021).

Now a research group at INSERM, France led by Thierry Hauet has developed a pig-based model of kidney autotransplantation that is comparable to the human situation with regards to the structure of the kidney and the damage that results from renal ischemia (for papers, see Jayle C, et al. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 2007; 292: F1082-1093; and Rossard L, et al. Curr Mol Med 2012; 12: 502-505). On the strength of these previous experiments, Hauet’s group has published a new paper in Stem Cells Translational Medicine in which they report that porcine afMSCs can protect against IR-related kidney injuries in pigs.

Hauet and others showed that porcine afMSCs could be easily collected at birth and cultured. These cells showed the ability to differentiate into fat, and bone cells, made many of the same cell surface markers as other types of mesenchymal stem cells (e.g., CD90, CD73, CD44, and CD29), but showed a diminished ability to differentiate into blood vessel cells. When afMSCs are added to extirpated kidneys during the reperfusion (reoxygenation) process in an “in vitro” (fancy way of saying “in a culture dish”) model of organ-preservation, these stem cells significantly increased the survival of blood vessel (endothelial) cells. Endothelial cells are one of the main targets of ischemic injury, and the added cells bucked up these endothelial cells and rescued them from programmed cell death. In addition to these successes, Hauet and others showed that adding intact porcine afMSCs was not necessary, since addition of the culture medium used to grow the afMSCs (conditioned medium or CM) also rescued kidney endothelial cell death. The afMSC-treated kidneys survived because they had significantly larger numbers of blood vessels, and this seems to be the main factor that causes the extirpated kidney to survive intact.

While these experiments were successful, Hauet and others know that unless they were able to show that these cells improved kidney transplant outcomes in a living animal, their research would not be deemed clinically relevant. Therefore, Hauet and others injected afMSCs into the renal artery of pigs that had received a kidney transplant six days after the transplant. IR injuries following kidney transplants led to increased serum creatinine levels, but those pigs that had been infused with afMSCs showed reduced creatinine levels and lower protein levels in their urine (proteinuria). In fact, seven days after the stem cell infusion, the urine creatinine and protein levels had returned to pre-transplant levels. Three months after the transplant, the pigs were put down, and then the kidneys were subjected to tissue analyses. Microscopic examination of tissue slices from these kidneys showed that afMSC injection preserved the structural integrity of microscopic details of the kidneys and reduced the signs of inflammation. Control animals that were not treated with afMSCs showed disruption of the microscopic structures of the kidneys and extensive inflammation and scarring. Also, because the kidney controls blood chemistry, a comparison of the blood chemistries of these two groups of animals showed that the blood chemistries of the afMSC-treated animals were normal as opposed to the control animals.

Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells Aid Kidney Transplantation in Porcine Model

Molecular analyses also showed a whole host of pro-blood vessel molecules in the kidneys of the afMSC-treated pigs. VEGFA (pro-angiogenic growth factor), and Ang1 (capillary structure strengthening and maintenance of vessel stability), proteins were increased in the kidneys of afMSC animals compared to control animals. Thus the infused stem cells increased the expression of pro-blood vessel molecules, which led to the formation of larger quantities of blood vessels, reduced cell death and decreased inflammation.

These findings demonstrate the beneficial effects of infused afMSCs on kidney transplant. Since afMSCs are easy to isolate and grow in culture, secrete proangiogenic and growth factors, and can differentiate into many cell lineages, including renal cells (see Perin L, et al. Cell Prolif 2007; 40: 936-948; De Coppi P, et al. Nat Biotechnol 2007; 25: 100-106; and In ‘t Anker PS, et al. Stem Cells 2004;22:1338-1345). This makes these cells a viable candidate for clinical application. This study also highlights pigs as a preclinical model as a powerful tool in the assessment of stem cell-based therapies in organ transplantation.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).