Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Form Prostate Gland Tissues


Repairing the prostate gland is an important goal in regenerative medicine. However, finding the right cell for the job has proven to be a slow and tedious search.

To that end, Wei-Qiang Gao and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in Shanghai, China, used mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord (hUC-MSCs) to test the ability of these cells to differentiate into prostate-specific cells. They combined hUC-MSCs with rat urogenital sinus stromal cells (rUGSSs) and then transplanted these cells into the renal capsule of BLB/c nude mice for two months. Cells tend to grow very well under the kidney capsule because this particular microenvironment has a very rich blood supply. Also the rUGSSs provide soluble, secreted factors that induce the hUC-MSCs to differentiate into prostate-specific cells.

After removing the implanted tissue, analyses of the implanted cells showed that the hUC-MSCs differentiated into prostate epithelial-like cells. This was confirmed by the presence of prostate specific antigen on the surfaces of these hUC-MSCs. Prostate specific antigen is only found on prostate cells, which is the reason why this protein is such a good indicator of prostate cancer. Also, the hUC-MSCs formed prostatic glandular structures that had the same cellular architecture as a normal prostate (see figure F below). Additionally, the human origin of the hUC-MSCs was further confirmed by the detection of a protein called human nuclear antigen, which is specific to human cells.

Human UC-MSCs combined with rUGSSs can generate prostate glands. Mice were sacrificed 2 months after co-transplantation surgery, and the kidneys from the cell implanted nude mice were collected. (A) Graft initiated with hUC-MSCs alone and (B) rUGSSs alone were used as negative control, respectively. (C) Graft derived with hUC-MSCs and rUGSSs. (D–F) Histological analyses of the sections of the graft stained for haematoxylin and eosin (H&E). (D) Note that while hUC-MSCs alone and (E) rUGSSs single cell type transplantation fail to regenerate prostate glandular structures. (F) co-transplantation of hUC-MSCs and rUGSSs gives rise to prostate glandular structures. Scale bar 50 mm.
Human UC-MSCs combined with rUGSSs can generate prostate glands. Mice were sacrificed 2 months after co-transplantation surgery, and the kidneys from the cell implanted nude mice were collected. (A) Graft initiated with hUC-MSCs alone and (B) rUGSSs alone were used as negative control, respectively. (C) Graft derived with hUC-MSCs and rUGSSs. (D–F) Histological analyses of the sections of the graft stained for haematoxylin and eosin (H&E). (D) Note that while hUC-MSCs alone and (E) rUGSSs single cell type transplantation fail to regenerate prostate glandular structures. (F) co-transplantation of hUC-MSCs and rUGSSs gives rise to prostate glandular structures. Scale bar 50 mm.

This interesting paper shows that hUC-MSCs can differentiate into epithelial-like cells that are normally derived from embryonic endodermal tissue. This implies that MSCs from umbilical cord can be used to repair not only prostate glands, but also other endodermally-derived tissues.

Advertisements

Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).