Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Form Limbal-Like Stem Cells


Limbal epithelial stem cells or LESCs are found at the periphery of the cornea and they continuously renew the corneal epithelium. Loss of this stem cell population can cause loss of corneal transparency and eventual loss of vision.

Genetic conditions can cause LESC deficiency, such as congenital aniridia, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or Ocular cicatricial pemphigoid. Other causes of LESC deficiency include chemical or thermal burns to the eye, microbial infections, extended contact lens wear, sulfur mustard gas poisoning, or chronic inflammation of the eye,

Limbal epithelial stem cells reside in the basal layer of the epithelium (Ep), which undulates at the limbus. Daughter transient amplifying cells (TACs) divide and migrate towards the central cornea (arrowed) to replenish the epithelium, which rests on Bowman's layer (BL). The stroma (St) of the limbal epithelial stem cell niche is populated with fibroblasts and melanocytes and also has a blood supply.
Limbal epithelial stem cells reside in the basal layer of the epithelium (Ep), which undulates at the limbus. Daughter transient amplifying cells (TACs) divide and migrate towards the central cornea (arrowed) to replenish the epithelium, which rests on Bowman’s layer (BL). The stroma (St) of the limbal epithelial stem cell niche is populated with fibroblasts and melanocytes and also has a blood supply.

Treatments of LESC deficiency include limbal stem cell grafts from one eye to another, but these grafts have a 3-5-year graft survival of only 30%-45%. If LESCs are expanded in culture on human amniotic membrane, then 76% of the grafts will successfully take 1-3 years after grafting. This procedure is not standardized. If LESCs are grafted from a cadaver, their survival is low.

Given these less than optimal treatments for LESC deficiencies, Alexander Ljubimov and his team from UCLA have used induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to make cultured LESCs. Ljubimov and his coworkers derived iPSCs from the skin cells of volunteers with non-integrating plasmids. Then they grew these cells on corneas that have been stripped of their cells and human amniotic membranes and these cells differentiated into LESC-like cells.

Ljubimov and others also made iPSCs from human LESCs, and when they cultured these iPSCs derived from LESCs on human amniotic membranes for two weeks, the cells differentiated into LESCs that made LESC-specific genes, and had the epigenetic characteristics of LESCs.

These experiments show that the cell source for iPSC derivation can greatly influence the epigenetic characteristics of the iPSC line. Also these experiments show that iPSCs can be used to make LESCs that can potentially be used for therapeutic purposes.

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).

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