Transplanted Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Bladder Scarring After Spinal Cord Injury


A collaborative research effort between laboratories from Canada and South Korea have shown that a cultured mesenchymal stem cell line called B10 can differentiate into smooth muscle cells and improve bladder function after a spinal cord injury.

Spinal cord injury can affect the lower portion of the urinary tract. Overactive bladder, urinary retention, and increased bladder thickness and fibrosis (bladder scarring) can result from spinal cord injuries. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate under certain conditions into smooth muscle. For this reason, MSCs have therapeutic potential for patients who have suffered from spinal cord injuries.

Seung U. Kim and his colleagues from Gachon University Gil Hospital in Inchon, South Korea have made an immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell line by transfecting primary cell cultures of fetal human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with a retroviral vector that contains the v-myc oncogene. This particular cells line, which they called HM3.B10 (or B10 for short), grows well in culture and can also differentiates into several different cell types.

In this present study, which was published in the journal Cell Transplantation, Kim and his colleagues and collaborators injected B10 hMSCs directly into the bladder wall of mice that had suffered a spinal cord injury but were not treated showed no such improvement.

“Human MSCs can secrete growth factors,” said study co-author Seung U. Kim of the Division of Neurology at the University of British Columbia Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. “In a previous study, we showed that B 10 cells secrete various growth factors including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and that HGF inhibits collagen deposits in bladder outlet obstructions in rats more than hMSCs alone. In this study, the SCI control group that did not receive B10 cells showed degenerated spinal neurons and did not recover. The B10-injected group appeared to have regenerated bladder smooth muscle cells.”

Four weeks after the initial spinal cord injury, the mice in the B10-treated group received injections of B10 cells transplanted directly into the bladder wall. Kim and his team used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track the transplanted B10 cells. The injected B10 cells had been previously labeled with fluorescent magnetic particles, which made them visible in an MRI.

“HGF plays an essential role in tissue regeneration and angiogenesis and acts as a potent antifibrotic agent,” explained Kim.

These experiments also indicated that local stem cell injections rather than systemic, intravenous infusion was the preferred method of administration, since systemic injection caused the hMSCs get stuck largely in the blood vessels of the lungs instead of the bladder.

The ability of the mice to void their bladders was assessed four weeks after the B10 transplantations. MRI analyses clearly showed strong signals in the bladder as a result of the labeled cells that had been previously transplanted. Post-mortem analyses of the bladders of the transplanted group showed even more pronounced differences, since the B10-injected animals had improved smooth muscle cells and reduced scarring.

These results suggest that MSC-based cell transplantation may be a novel therapeutic strategy for bladder dysfunction in patients with SCI.

“This study provides potential evidence that an human [sic] stable immortalized MSC line could be useful in the treatment of spinal cord injury-related problems such as bladder dysfunction.” said Dr. David Eve, associate editor of Cell Transplantation and Instructor at the Center of Excellence for Aging & Brain Repair at the University of South Florida. “Further studies to elucidate the mechanisms of action and the long-term effects of the cells, as well as confirm the optimal route of administration, will help to illuminate what the true benefit of these cells could be.”

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).