The First Patient Treated with iPSC-Derived Cells


Nature News has reported that a Japanese patient was received the first treatment derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

Ophthalmologist Masayo Takahashi from the Riken Center for Developmental Biology and her team used genetic engineering techniques to reprogram skin fibroblasts from this patient into induced pluripotent stem cells. These cultured iPSCs were then differentiated into retinal pigment epithelium cells. Takahashi’s colleagues, led by Yasuo Kurimoto at Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, then implanted those retinal pigment epithelium cells into the retina of this female patient, who suffers from age-related macular degeneration.

It is unlikely that this procedure will restore the woman’s vision. However, because age-related macular degeneration is a progressive process, Takahashi and her research team will be examining if this procedure prevents further deterioration of her sight. Takahashi’s Riken team has extensively tested this procedure in laboratory animals and recently received human trial clearance. Takahashi’s team will also be looking particularly hard at the side effects of this procedure; such as immune reaction or cancerous growth.

“We’ve taken a momentous first step toward regenerative medicine using iPS cells,” Takahashi says in a statement, according to Nature News. “With this as a starting point, I definitely want to bring [iPS cell-based regenerative medicine] to as many people as possible.”

Advertisements

Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).