Conditioning Stem Cells to Survive in the Heart


After a heart attack, the heart is a very inhospitable place for implanted stem cells. These cells have to deal with low oxygen levels, marauding white blood cells, toxins released from dead or nearly-dead cells, and other nasty things.

Getting cells to survive in this place is essential if the cells are going to provide any healing to he heart. Fortunately, a Chinese group has discovered that growing cells in inhospitable conditions before implantation greatly improves their survival. Now, this same group from Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia has shown that a small molecule can do the same thing.

This work, published in Current Stem Cell Research and Therapy, centers upon a pathway in cells controlled by a protein called the hypoxia-inducible factor or HIF. This protein regulates those genes that allow cells to withstand low-oxygen and other stressful conditions. HIF is composed of two parts: an oxygen-sensitive inducible HIF-1α subunit and a constitutive HIF-1β subunit. During nonstressful conditions, the alpha subunit is constantly being degraded after it is made because it is modified by a enzymes called prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes. In the presence of low oxygen conditions, PHD enzymes are inhibited and HIF-1α increases in concentration. The HIFα/β heterodimer forms and is stabilized, and translocates to the nucleus where it activates target genes.

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It turns out that small molecules can inhibit PHD enzymes and induce the low-oxygen status in cells without subjecting them to rigorous culture conditions. For example, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) can inhibit PHD enzymes and produce in cells the types of responses normally observed under low-oxygen conditions.

In this paper, Ling Wei and colleagues cultured mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow with or without 1 mM DMOG for 24 hours in complete culture medium before transplantation. These cells were then transplanted into the hearts of rats 30 minutes after those rats had suffered an experimentally-induced heart attack. They then measured the rates of cell death 24 hours after engraftment, and heart function, new blood vessel formation and infarct size 4 weeks later.

In DMOG-preconditioned bone marrow MSCs (DMOG-BMSCs), the expression of survival and blood-vessel-making factors were significantly increased. In comparison with control cells.  DMOG-BMSCs also survived better and enhanced the formation of new blood vessels in culture and when implanted into the heart of a living animal.
C to H , Angiogenesis was inspected using vWF staining (red) in heart sections from MI, C-BMSC and DMOG-BMSC groups 4 weeks after MI. Hoechst staining (blue) s hows the total cells. I. Summary of total tube length measured in experiments A and B. The t otal tube length in C- BMSC group was arbitrarily presented as 1. N = 3 independent measure ments. J , Summary of total vessel density in different groups of in vivo experiments. N = 8 animals in each group. * P <0.05 compared with C-BMSC group; # P <0.05 compared with MI control group.
C to H, Angiogenesis was inspected using vWF staining (red) in heart sections from MI, C-BMSC
and DMOG-BMSC groups 4 weeks after MI. Hoechst staining (blue) shows the total cells. I. Summary of total tube length measured in experiments A and B. The total tube length in C-BMSC group was arbitrarily presented as 1. N = 3 independent measurements. J, Summary of total vessel density in different groups of in vivo experiments. N = 8 animals in each group.
Transplantation of DMOG-BMSCs also reduced heart infarct size and promoted functional benefits of the cell therapy.
Effect of BMSCs transplantation on ischemia-induced infarct formation. Heart infarct area and scar formation were determined using Masson’s Trichrome staining 4 weeks after MI. A to C . Images of representative infarcted hearts from a MI control rat, a MI rat received C-BMSCs, and a MI rat received DMOG-BMSCs. D. Transplantation of BMSCs reduced heart infarction formation, the protective effects were significantly greater with transplantation of DMOG-BMSCs. N = 5 rats in each group. * P <0.05 compared with MI group; # P <0.05 compared with C-BMSC group.
Effect of BMSCs transplantation on ischemia-induced infarct formation. Heart infarct area and scar formation were determined using Masson’s
Trichrome staining 4 weeks after MI. A to C. Images of representative infarcted hearts from a MI control
rat, a MI rat received C-BMSCs, and a MI rat received DMOG-BMSCs. D. Transplantation of BMSCs
reduced heart infarction formation, the protective effects were significantly greater with transplantation of DMOG-BMSCs. N = 5 rats in each group.
Thus, this paper shows that targeting an oxygen sensing system in stem cells such as PHD enzymes (prolyl hydroxylase) provides a new promising pharmacological approach for enhanced survival of BMSCs.  This procedure also increases paracrine signaling, augments the regenerative activities of these cells, and, ultimately, and improves functional recovery of the heart as a result of cell transplantation therapy for the heart after a heart attack.  This is only a preclinical study, but the data is strong, and hopefully new clinical trials will bear this out.
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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).