European Knee Meniscus Injury Pilot Trial to Evaluate Cytori Cell Therapy Begins


Cytori Therapeutics is a cell therapy company that is in the process of developing cell therapies from a patient’s own fat tissue that can potentially treat a variety of medical conditions. To date, the preclinical studies and clinical trials suggest that their Cytori Cell Therapy can improve blood flow, modulate the immune system, and facilitating wound repair.

Recently, Cytori has announced that it has enrolled its first patients in an ambitious clinical trial that will test their stem cell product in patients undergoing surgery for traumatic injuries to the meniscus of the knee.  The meniscus is a wedge of cartilage on either side of the knee joint that acts a a shock absorber between the femur and the head of the tibia.

meniscus

Ramon Cugat, who is the Co-Director of the Orthopedic Institute, Hospital Quiron Barcelona, Spain, is the principal investigator for this trial. Dr. Cugat serves as an orthopedic surgeon at Hospital Quiron Barcelona. This trial will test the ability of Cytori Cell Therapy to heal the meniscus and is being conducted in parallel with a similar trial that is testing the Cytori Cell Therapy as a treatment for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repairs. The patients treated with Cytori Cell Therapy for ACL repairs are still being evaluated, but to date, no safety related concerns have emerged and the patients seem to have improved. These preliminary results were presented at the Barcelona Knee Symposium in November 2014.

knee_joint

“Dr. Cugat is a leading expert in treating traumatic knee injuries in elite athletes,” said Dr. Marc H. Hedrick, President and CEO of Cytori Therapeutics. “These trials are important to Cytori because, at minimal cost to us, they provide additional clinical evidence that our therapy can be safely used in treating a multitude of knee conditions.”

The meniscus trial is a two-center, phase I study that will assess the safety and efficacy of Cytori’s ECCM-50 adipose-derived regenerative cell therapy in meniscus repair. In this trial, up to 60 patients who have had meniscus surgery to repair the meniscus will receive injection of the cells directly into the meniscus. Each patient will be evaluated by several clinical read outs that assess the recovery of the patient after meniscus surgery. As in the case of the ACL repair study, the goal of this trial is to determine if Cytori Cell Therapy can be safely delivered to the meniscus and whether efficacy can be observed.

“Tears to the meniscus are problematic injuries for active individuals, particularly athletes. Based on the early results from a recent series of 20 patients treated for complete anterior cruciate ligament injuries, we are eager to evaluate whether augmentation surgery with Cytori Cell Therapy will lead to quicker and more complete healing,” said Dr. Cugat.

Injected patients will fill out a patient questionnaire that assesses knee pain, function and activity, This questionnaire is called the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), but patients will also be physically examined to ascertain the extent of their knee function and the degree of their movement, with or without pain. Patients will be given a visual analogue score to assess knee pain, and knee function will be assessed by the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, Tegner Activity Scale, and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Each patient will also have their knees examined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in order to examine the structural integrity of their meniscus. These assessments will be taken before and 60, 90, 180 and 365 days after surgery and the MRIs will be done before and at 90, 180 and 365 days after surgery.

The preliminary results of the ACL study showed that the Cytori strategy was feasible and did not result in any significant safety issues above that seen with a standard small volume liposuction. All the injected patients recovered without any complications. The results of the ACL trial were compared to a historical control group of patients who had the same surgical procedure by the same surgical team but without other interventions. Overall, the patient’s recovery from pain and their ability to return to daily activities was accelerated as a result of the therapeutic enriched bone-patellar tendon-bone transplant. Both the patient questionnaires and serial MRI scans of the knees following cell therapy were consistent with accelerated healing of the graft. Presently, Dr. Cugat and his coworkers are obtaining one year follow-up information on the treated patients and they will report their data in a peer-reviewed journal in the future.

ACL and meniscus tears are among the most common sports-related knee injuries and unfortunately, these two injuries often are sustained simultaneously. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, ACL injuries have an annual incidence of more than 200,000 cases with nearly half undergoing surgical reconstruction. Further, an estimated 850,000 patients undergo surgical procedures to address meniscus injuries each year.

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).