Stem Cell Treatments for Stroke: A Tale of Two Trials


Two different clinical trials that examined the efficacy of stem cell treatments after a stroke have yielded very different results.

“Stroke” refers to a serious medical condition that occurs when the blood supply to the brain is disrupted by blockage of or injury to blood vessels that supply the brain with blood. Strokes cause a loss of, or reduction in, brain function. There are two main types of strokes. Ischemic stroke accounts for about 80% of strokes. Ischemic strokes result from the cessation of blood flow to an area of the brain because of a blood clot. Hemorrhagic stroke occurs if there is a leakage of blood into the brain because a blood vessel has burst. The bleed into the brain increases the pressure on the brain and leads to brain damage.

In the two clinical trials discussed in this post, both treatments were designed to address ischemic strokes, which disrupt the blood supply to the brain and starve brain cells of oxygen, causing them to die. Brain scans of patients who have suffered from an ischemic stroke may reveal large areas of damaged brain tissue. People who have had a stroke may experience difficulties with speech and language, orientation and movement, or memory. Such problems can be permanent or temporary.

Any advances in the treatment of stroke are particularly Currently, the only available treatment is to administer anti-clotting agents to dissolve the clot that has blocked the blood flow to the brain. Unfortunately, this treatment must be provided early and only a small proportion of patients get to hospital in time to be treated in this way.

There are no existing treatments for an ischemic stroke beyond the initial acute phase. However, rehabilitation can alleviate the disabilities caused by a stroke.

The European Stroke Organization released the results of large clinical trials on the treatment of strokes with CTX0E03 human neural stem cells. The PISCES trial, as it is known, is a phase I trial, and such trials usually involve giving a small number of people a new treatment to see if it is safe. Phase I trials are not designed to test if the treatment is effective, so any positive results from a Phase I trial should be treated with some caution.

This study examined the safety and tolerability of a stem cell therapy called ReN001 in the treatment of ischemic stroke.

11 males with long-term disability between 6 and 60 months after a stroke. None of the patients showed any cell-related or immunological adverse events. Patients did show sustained reductions in neurological impairment and spasticity compared to their stable pre-treatment baseline performance.

This clinical trial is a win for ReNeuron, the company that developed, makes and markets, ReN001. A Phase II is being planned.

A second clinical trial examined the efficacy of Athersys, Inc. MultiStem treatment for ischemic stroke. This phase II trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of the product in stroke patients. 65 patients were treated with MultiStem and 61 were given the placebo. Unfortunately, even though the MultiStem treatment was safe as well tolerated, the cell therapy did not produce any statistically significant differences at 90 days in patients compared with a placebo.

Even though the data was disappointing, a second look at the data showed something interesting. When the 27 stroke patients who had received the MultiStem treatment 24-26 hours after the stroke were compared with all the other patients, it became clear that these patients did the best. Therefore, this trial seems to indicate that the window of treatment for MultiStem after a stroke is 24-36 hours and after 36 hours it works no better than placebo.

“Unfortunately, we just didn’t have the window right for this study,” Athersys Chief Operating Officer William Lehmann Reuters News Service. “We believe investors should see this as a sign that MultiStem works.”

The MultiStem treatment was also associated with lower rates of mortality and life threatening adverse effects, infections and lung-related events. Nine patients who had received the placebo died during the 90 day period (14.8%) while only four who received the MultiStem treatment died (6.2%).

The CEO of Athersys, Gil Van Bokkelen, said: “While the trial did not achieve the primary or component secondary endpoints, we believe the evidence indicating that patients who received MultiStem treatment early appeared to exhibit meaningfully better recovery is important and promising.”

This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 study is being conducted at sites in the United States and the United Kingdom.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).

One thought on “Stem Cell Treatments for Stroke: A Tale of Two Trials”

  1. For those that want to see the window expanded for stroke treatment to 36 hrs …that is 32 hrs beyond the current window for TPA… you should listen to the conference call that Athersys had with its investors. this c/c included both lead investigators who are preeminent stroke doctors in the world the link is as follows Apr 29, 2015 2:00 PM Est Shareholder Conference Call ……………………………… http://athersys.com/events.cfm …………………………………….

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