Gene Controls Proliferation of Muscle Stem Cells


Fortunately, skeletal muscles have a high potential for regeneration, unlike other organs. When injured, muscle stem cells, known as satellite cells and located between the individual muscle fibers, rapidly begin to proliferate and subsequently replace the damaged muscles cells. New research from researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim, Germany, have shown that a protein called Prmt5 plays a key role in regulating the activity of muscle satellite cells. These data gave rise to new studies that would like to examine the impact of Prmt5 in muscle disorders.

Satellite cells in skeletal muscles are small, spherical stem cells in between the individual muscles fibers. Normally, these cells remain almost completely inactive, but when a muscle is immediately begin to proliferate and heal the injury by replacing damaged muscles fibers.

satellite_cells

When satellite cells react to an injury, they undergo a transition from their inactive state to one of increased activity. This transition must be finely balanced because uncontrolled proliferation of satellite cells in healthy muscle tissue increases the risk of tumor formation. Conversely, muscle regeneration is impeded if the satellite cells are not activated fast enough when muscles are injured.

satellite cells
satellite cells

Now a research team headed by Thomas Braun from the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim has now identified a gene that plays a decisive role in regulating the activity of satellite cells. Braun and his colleagues isolated muscle satellite cells from laboratory mice and identified 120 genes that are instrumental for the function of these cells.

Next, they switched off one of these genes, Prmt5, in the satellite cells of adult mice. “In healthy mice, switching off Prmt5 in the satellite cells had no effect on the muscles. But when the mice had a muscle injury, the results were completely different”, says Ting Zhang, the study’s lead author. No signs of regeneration were observed in Prmt5-deficient mice, but the muscles of control mice that had an active Prmt5 gene healed normally. “Instead of growing new muscle tissue, the mice without Prmt5 eventually developed clear signs of fibrosis”.

Braun and others further examined how Prmt5 regulates muscle regeneration. In mice without Prmt5, the number of satellite cells was noticeably reduced. Prmt5 seems to regulate proliferation activity of satellite cells. Furthermore, these results indicated that Prmt5 also prevents satellite cells from dying prematurely and plays a key role in transforming them into functional muscle fibers.

Braun and his colleagues hope their study will help them gain a better understanding of muscle disorders in humans. “The loss of muscle tissue in the absence of Prmt5 shows clear parallels to degenerative muscle disorders such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy”, says Johnny Kim, a member of Braun’s working group. In fact, the Bad Nauheim team now hopes that in the future, mice lacking the Prmt5 gene can serve as models for this particular disorder. “But we also want to study the etiological effects of Prmt5 regarding the genesis of muscular hypertrophies and certain tumor types,” Kim adds.

Epilepsy Reduces The Formation of New Neurons in the Brain


An ambitious, multidisciplinary project led by Amanda Sierra and Juan Manuel Encinas, Ikerbasque from the Achucarro centre (Achucarro Basque Center for Neuroscience) has discovered that epilepsy in a mouse model system reduces the production of new cells in the brain.

The hippocampus is a region of the brain involved in learning and memory and it is also the site of a robust neural stem cell population that generates new neurons. These hippocampal neural stem cells generate new neurons throughout the adult life of mammals. The cells generated by the hippocampal neural stem cells function in certain types of learning and memory and in responses to anxiety and stress.

Hippocampus

This new research by Sierra and Encinas has revealed that in epileptic mice, hippocampal neural stem cells stop generating new neurons and are turn into reactive astrocytes. Reactive astrocytes promote inflammation and alter communication between neurons. Could manipulation of neural stem cells provide new ways to treat epilepsy?

Reactive Astrocyte
Reactive Astrocyte

This work has recently been published in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

The results of this research also confirms previous work by the same group that showed that epilepsy, which causes hyperexcitation of neurons but does not cause convulsions, activates neural stem cells, which leads to their premature exhaustion. Thus the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus ends is chronically reduced.

Juan Manuel Encinas, the leader of this study, highlighted the fact that “this discovery has enabled us to gain a better understanding about how neural stem cells function. We have shown that in addition to generating neurons and astrocytes, neural stem cells in the adult hippocampus can generate reactive astrocytes following an epileptic seizure.”

Encinas and his colleagues carried out this work in experimental animals that were genetically engineered to be epileptic. However, this discovery has clear implications in clinical practice and in the quest to develop new therapies for epilepsy, since the generation of new neurons (neurogenesis) is a process that is negatively affected in epileptic seizures in the hippocampus. Encinas pointed out, “If we can manage to preserve the population of neural stem cells and their capacity to generate new neurons in humans, it may be possible to prevent the development of certain symptoms associated with epilepsy and very likely to mitigate the damage that is caused in the hippocampus.”

In this project, Encinas and his colleagues collaborated with research groups attached to institutions such as the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (United States), the Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium), the Achucarro centre itself, and the UPV/EHU’s Genetic Expression Service.