Fat-Derived Stem Cells Form Muscle in Muscular Dystrophy Mice


Stem cell therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has been plagued by poor cell engraftment into diseased muscles. Additionally, there are no reports to date describing the efficient generation of muscle progenitors from fat-derived stem cells (ADSCs) that can contribute to muscle regeneration.

A study by Cheng Zhang and others from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China, Guangdong Province has examined the ability of progenitor cells differentiated from ADSCs using forskolin, basic fibroblast growth factor, the glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor 6-bromoindirubin-3′-oxime as well as the supernatant of ADSC cultures to form workable muscle cells.

When these fat-derived stem cells were treated as described above, they formed a proliferative population of muscle progenitors from ADSCs that had characteristics similar to muscle satellite cells. Furthermore, in culture, these cells were capable of terminal differentiation into multinucleated myotubes.

When these fat-derived stem cells were transplanted into mice that had an inherited type of DMD, the progenitor cells successfully engrafted in skeletal muscle for up to 12 weeks, and generated new muscle fibers, restored dystrophin expression, and contributed to the satellite cell compartment.

These findings highlight the potential application of ADSCs for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. They also illustrate the ability of ADSCs to differentiate into functional skeletal muscle cells when treated properly in culture. These same cells might serve as a treatment for DMD patients.

This article was published in Hum. Mol. Genet. (2015) doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddv316.

Advertisements

Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).