Intravenous Bone Marrow For Stroke: Clinical Trial


Akihiko Taguchi from the Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation in Kobe, Japan, in collaboration with a whole host of colleagues from various places treated stroke with their own bone marrow. This is a Phase 1/2 clinical trial but it is a very small trial that was neither blinded not placebo-controlled. Therefore, while this trial is useful, the results are of limited value.

In this clinical trial, 12 stroke patients were divided into two groups, one of which received 25 milliliters and the other of which received 50 milliliters of bone marrow cells 7-10 days after their strokes. The bone marrow cells were administered intravenously. To isolate bone marrow cells, the so-called “mononuclear fraction” was isolated from whole bone marrow samples that came from bone marrow aspirations. Patients were evaluated by means of brain imaging to measure blood flow in their brains, and a series of neurological tests. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale or NIHSS scores were used to grade the neurological capabilities of each patient. Patients were examined 1 month and then 6 months after treatment.

All treated patients were compared with the records of other stroke patients in the past who were not treated with bone marrow cells. These comparisons showed that the bone marrow-treated patients showed a trend towards improved neurological outcomes. Statistically, the bone marrow-treated patients had significantly better blood flow and oxygen consumption in their brains 6 months after treatment compared to the historic controls. Also, the NIHSS scores of the bone marrow-treated patients were also significantly better than those of the historic controls. Patients who received the higher doses of bone marrow cells did better than those who received the lower doses.

There were also no apparent adverse effects to administering the bone marrow cells. One patient experienced pneumonia and sepsis 3 months after cell therapy, but data monitoring largely eliminated the cell therapy as being a contributing factor to this issue. Another patient experienced a seconded stroke that was detected the day after the cell therapy. Because the patient had shown signs of a stroke the day before treatment, the association between the cell therapy and the recurrent stroke is rather unclear. None of the other patients showed any worsening of their present strokes, seizures, or other complications.

All in aloe, it seems as though this procedure is safe, and there is a trend towards increased metabolic and neurological recovery. However, this is a very small study and these trends may not hold in a larger study. Secondly, these patients must be followed for an extended period of time in order to determine if these improvements are durable or transient. Finally, these improvements must be compared with a placebo if there are going to convince the FDA.

Bone marrow cells contain a variety of stem cells and other types of cells that may release cocktails of healing molecules that help cells survive, make new blood vessels, and tamp down inflammation. Additionally, bone marrow cells might stimulate resident populations of stem cells to proliferate and make new neurons and glial cells. Until these positive results can be reproduced in larger, better controlled studies, these results will remain interesting and hopeful, but ultimately inconclusive.

These results were published in Stem Cells and Development 2015 DOI: 10.1089/scd.2015.0160.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).