Delivery of a Missing Protein Heals Damaged Hearts in Animals


Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have enabled the regeneration of damaged heart tissue in animals by delivering a protein to it by means of a bioengineered collagen patch.

“This finding opens the door to a completely revolutionary treatment,” said Pilar Ruiz-Lozano, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics at Stanford. “There is currently no effective treatment to reverse the scarring in the heart after heart attacks.”

Ruiz-Lozano and her colleagues published their data online in the journal Nature.

During a heart attack, cardiac muscle cells or cardiomyocytes die from a lack of blood flow. Replacing dead cells is vital for the organ to fully recover, but, unfortunately, the adult mammalian heart does not possess a great deal of regenerative ability. Therefore, scar tissue forms instead of heart muscle, and since scar tissue does not contract, it compromises the ability of the heart to function properly.

Heart attacks kill millions of people every year, and the number of heart attacks is predicted to rise precipitously in the next few decades. The number of heart attacks might even triple by 2030. Approximately, 735,000 Americans suffer a heart attack each year, and even though many victims survive the initial injury, the resulting loss of cardiomyocytes can lead to heart failure and even death. “Consequently, most survivors face a long and progressive course of heart failure, with poor quality of life and very high medical costs,” Ruiz-Lozano said. Transplanting healthy muscle cells and stem cells into a damaged heart have been tried, but these trials have mixed results, typically, and have yet to produce consistent success in promoting healing of the heart.

Previous heart regeneration studies in zebrafish have shown that the outer layers of the heart, known as the epicardium, is one of the driving tissues for healing a damaged heart. Ruiz-Lozano said, “We wanted to know what in the epicardium stimulates the myocardium, the muscle of the heart, to regenerate.” Since adult mammalian hearts do not regenerate effectively, Ruiz-Lozano and her co-workers wanted to know whether epicardial substances might stimulate regeneration in mammalian hearts and restore function after a heart attack.

She and her colleagues focused on Fstl1, which is a protein secreted by the epicardium, and acts as a growth factor for cardiomyocytes. Not only did this protein kick-start the proliferation of cardiomyocytes in petri dishes, but Ruiz-Lozano and others found that it was missing from damaged epicardial tissue following heart attacks in humans.

Next, Ruiz-Lozano and her colleagues reintroduced Fstl1 back into the damaged epicardial tissue of mice and pigs that had suffered a heart attack. They embedded a bioengineered patch on to the damaged heart tissue that was imbued with Fstl1. Then they sutured the patch, loaded with Fstl1, to the damaged tissue. These patches were made of natural material known as collagen that had been structurally modified to mimic certain mechanical properties of the epicardium.

Because the patches are made of collagen, they contain no cells, which mean that recipients do not need immunosuppressive drugs to avoid rejection. With time, the collagen material is absorbed into the heart. The elasticity of the material resembles that of the fetal heart, and seems to be one of the keys to providing a hospitable environment for muscle regrowth. New blood vessels regenerated there as well.

Within two to four weeks of receiving the patch, heart muscle cells began to proliferate and the animals progressively recovered heart function. “Many were so sick prior to getting the patch that they would have been candidates for heart transplantation,” Ruiz-Lozano said. The hope is that a similar procedure could eventually be used in human heart-attack patients who suffer severe heart damage.

The work integrated the efforts of multiple labs around the world, including labs at the Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in San Diego, UC-San Diego, Boston University School of Medicine, Imperial College London and Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences.

Stanford has a patent on the patch, and Ruiz-Lozano is chief scientific officer at Epikabio Inc., which has an exclusive option to license this technology.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).

2 thoughts on “Delivery of a Missing Protein Heals Damaged Hearts in Animals”

  1. Done a great job. Congratulation. I wish if any direct natural molecule mimics the protein ‘Fstl1’ once identified (to make convenient dosage form i.e tablet, capsule etc.) & protects human being from heart attack naturally.
    I am pharmacist (B.Pharm, M.Pharm), Bangladesh. Best wishes from this community.

  2. Thank you for your interest. I quite agree that if someone could design a drug that mimics Fstl1 activity, they would become a millionaire. It would revolutionize the treatment of heart attacks..

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