3D Printing of Stem Cells on Bioceramic Molds to Reconstruct Skulls


Skull defects or injuries can be very difficult to repair. However, an Australian research team has pioneered a new technique that can regrow skulls by applying stem cells to a premade scaffold with a 3D printer.

This research team consists of a surgeon, a neurosurgeon, two engineers, and a chief scientist. This five-person team is collaborating with a 3D printing firm that is based in Vienna in order to manufacture exact replicas of bone taken from the skulls of patients.

The protocol for this procedure utilizes stem cells and 3D printers, and is funded by a $1.5 million research grant that is aimed at reducing costs and improving efficiency of the Australian public health service.

The first subjects for this procedure will include patients whose skulls were severely damaged, or had a piece of their skull removed for brain surgery, and require cranial reconstruction. The skull reconstructions will take place at the Royal Perth Hospital. The first trial will commence next year. If this procedure proves to be successful it could reduce the risk of complications and surgical time, and provide massive cost savings.

If a patient has a skull injury or some other skull issue, pieces of skull bone were removed bone and stored it in a freezer for later implantation into the skull. Unfortunately, this procedure often resulted in infection or resorption of the bone. Alternatively, titanium plates can be used but these eventually they degrade, and therefore, are not ideal.

Neurosurgeon Marc Coughlan, who is a member of the five-person research team that developed this procedure, said this protocol represents the first time stem cells have been used on a 3D printed scaffold to regrow bone. “What we’re trying to do is take it one step further and have the ceramic resorb and then be only left with the patient’s bone, which would be exactly the same as having the skull back,” Coughlan told The Australian.

If this procedure proves successful, it could revolutionize cranial reconstruction surgeries. According to health minister Kim Hames, “This project highlights some of the innovative and groundbreaking research that is under way in WA’s public health system, and the commitment of the government to supporting this crucial work.”

We will keep tabs on this clinical trial to determine if it works as well as reported.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).