Quad Technologies Introduces New Cell Separation Technologies


Quad Technologies in Woburn, Massachusetts has developed a new cell separation system that might revolutionize cell purification.

Adopting cell technologies for clinical applications requires the manipulation of large numbers of cells that contain specific cell types that must be isolated from the rest of the cells. The isolation and purification of large numbers of cells is integral to cell-based therapies, but such procedures are often, expensive, laborious, tedious, and sometimes inefficient.

After securing proper financing, Quad Technologies Inc., launched its MagCloudz Streptavadin Cell Separation Kit, which is a commercially available product that incorporates QuickGel technology.

QuickGel is a hydrogel that is compatible with cells and is non-cytotoxic. This gel can be adapted for use with antibodies or types of tools that are used to isolate different cell populations. When antibodies or other proteins are applied to cells so that they can bind to the surfaces of specific cell types and facilitate purification of that cell population, a major limitation is the antibody finding all the cells in a culture. My immobilizing the cells if a gel matrix, the antibody has a much easier job of finding its target cells. Such gels, therefore, can greatly increase the binding of antibodies or some other purification protein. The gel is also dissolvable and easily removed without damaging targeted cells. QuickGel can greatly increase the purification efficiency of cells for therapeutic purposes.

The MagCloudz kit uses magnetic beads that bind specifically to cells that can be used to purify that cell population efficiently and quickly. The beads can then be easily released from the cells without compromising the viability or quality of the cells.

These enhanced cell purification technologies will deliver breakthrough therapies for stem cell clinics.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).