First Stem Cell Trial for Alzheimer’s Disease Will Enroll Patients Next Year


A research group from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine will be conducting the first clinical trial that will test the ability of stem cells to treat Alzheimer’s disease.

According the Bernard Baumel, assistant professor of neurology at the Miller School of Medicine and the principal investigator for this phase I clinical trial, said “We believe infusions of these types of stem cells have the potential to be beneficial to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.” Because this trial is a phase 1 clinical trial, it will test the safety of this treatment strategy.

Baumel and his colleagues plan to test the safety of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.  In order to acquire high-quality MSCs for this clinical trials, Dr. Baumel is collaborating with his colleague Joshua Hare, Louis Lemberg Professor of Medicine and director of the Miller School’s Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI).  Dr. Hare is an expert in the use and manipulation of MSCs who has developed a life sciences company called Longeveron that isolates, characterized and stores MSCs for clinical applications.

“Stem cells are very potent anti-inflammatories,” Dr. Baumel said. “Because the amyloid plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients are associated with inflammation, infusions of stem cells may help to improve or stabilize that condition. Those new brain cells may then be able to replace damaged cells in Alzheimer’s patients.”

Previous work in several different laboratories has demonstrated the anti-inflammatory capacities of MSCs (Chen PM, et al J Biomed Sci. 2011; 18:49), but other laboratories have even observed that, under certain conditions, MSCs can differentiate into brain cells (Tsz Kin Ng, et al World J Stem Cells. 2014 Apr 26; 6(2): 111–119). Therefore, MSCs potentially provide a powerful one-two punch for treating Alzheimer’s disease patients.

This clinical trial is called “Allogeneic Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Infusion Versus Placebo in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease,” and enrollment for this trial will begin in early 2016 and continue through to 2018. Patients enrolled in the study will have their undergo cognitive function tests before and after the treatment, quality of life assessments and brain volume measurements in order to acquire some knowledge of the potential effectiveness of this cell-based treatment strategy.

Patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease but who are otherwise healthy will be encouraged to enroll in this study.

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).