Positive Results from Phase 2 Study in Spinal Cord Injury


Stem Cells, Inc., has released the six-month results from cohort I of an ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial of human neural stem cells for the treatment of chronic cervical spinal cord injuries. The data displayed significant improvements in muscle strength had occurred in five of the six patients treated. Of these five patients, four of them also showed improved performance on functional tasks that assesses dexterity and fine motor skills. Furthermore, these four patients improved in the level of spinal cord injury according to the classification system provided by the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury or ISNCSCI.

Stem Cells, Inc., expects to release their detailed final 12-month results on this first open-cohort later this quarter.

Chief medical officer, Stephen Huhn, presented these data at the American Spinal Injury Association annual meeting in Philadelphia, on Friday, April 15.  Dr. Huhn also believes that the interim results are very encouraging and reason to be quite hopeful.

“The emerging data continue to be very encouraging,” said Dr. Huhn. “We believe that these types of motor changes will improve the independence and quality of life of patients and are the first demonstration that a cellular therapy has the ability to impact recovery in chronic spinal cord injury. We currently have thirteen sites in the United States and Canada that are actively recruiting patients. We have enrolled and randomized 19 of the 40 total patients in the statistically powered, single-blind, randomized controlled, Cohort II. We are projecting to complete enrollment by the end of September so that we can have final results in 2017.”

The present Phase 2 clinical trial is a multi-center enterprise that includes physicians and scientists at 13 different sites in the united States and Canada. Incidentally, these sites are presently actively recruiting patients.

Stem Cells, Inc., has enrolled and randomized 19 of the 40 total patients in this statistically powered, single-blind, randomized controlled, cohort II.

The Phase 2 study, “Study of Human Central Nervous System (CNS) Stem Cell Transplantation in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury,” will determine the safety and efficacy of transplanting the company’s proprietary human neural stem cells (HuCNS-SC cells) into patients with traumatic injury of the cervical region of the spinal cord.

Cohort I is an open label dose-ranging cohort in six AIS-A or AIS-B subjects. For those of you not familiar with the American Spinal Injury Impairment Scale (ASI A-E scale), here is a summary of the classification scheme:

ASI – A = Complete paralysis; No sensory or motor function is preserved in the sacral segments S4-5.
ASI – B = Sensory Incomplete; Sensory but not motor function is preserved below the neurological level and includes the sacral segments S4-5 (light touch or pin prick at S4-5 or deep anal pressure) AND no motor function is preserved more than three levels below the motor level on either side of the body.
ASI – C = Motor Incomplete; Motor function is preserved below the neurological level**, and more than half of key muscle functions below the neurological level of injury (NLI) have a muscle grade less than 3 (Grades 0-2).
ASI – D = Motor Incomplete; Motor function is preserved below
the neurological level**, and at least half (half or more) of key muscle functions below the NLI have a muscle grade > 3.
ASI – E = Normal; If sensation and motor function as tested with the ISNCSCI are graded as normal in all segments, and the patient had prior deficits, then the AIS grade is E. Someone without an initial SCI does not receive an AIS grade.
Cohort II is a randomized, controlled, single-blinded cohort in forty AIS-B subjects. Cohort III, which will only be conducted at the discretion of the sponsor, is an open-label arm that involves six AIS-C subjects.
The primary efficacy outcome will focus on changes in the upper extremity strength as measured in the hands, arms, and shoulders.  This trial will enroll up to 52 subjects.
StemCells, Inc. has demonstrated the safety and efficacy of their HuCNS-SC cell in preclinical studies in laboratory rodents.  Additional Phase I studies yielded positive human safety data.  Furthermore, completed and ongoing clinical studies in which its proprietary HuCNS-SC cells have been transplanted directly into all three components of the central nervous system: the brain, the spinal cord and the retina of the eye, have further demonstrated the safety of HuCNS SC cells in human patients.
StemCells, Inc. clinicians and scientists believe that HuCNS-SC cells may have broad therapeutic application for many diseases and disorders of the CNS. Because the transplanted HuCNS-SC cells have been shown to engraft and survive long-term, there is the possibility of a durable clinical effect following a single transplantation.
The HuCNS-SC platform technology is a highly purified composition of human neural stem cells (tissue-derived or “adult” stem cells). Manufactured under cGMP standards, the Company’s HuCNS-SC cells are purified, expanded in culture, cryopreserved, and then stored as banks of cells, ready to be made into individual patient doses when needed.
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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).