Weissman Laboratory Define Roadmap for Pluripotent Human Stem Cell Differentiation into Mesodermal Fates: Cells Rapidly Generate Bone, Heart Muscle


How do we get stem cells to differentiate into the cell types we want? Implanting undifferentiated stem cells into a living organism can sometimes result in cells that differentiate into unwanted cell types. Such a phenomenon is called heterotropic differentiation and it is a genuine concern of regenerative medicine. What is a clinical researcher to do? Answer: make a road map of the events that drive cells to differentiate into specific cell types and their respective precursors.

Researchers in the laboratory of Irving Weissman at Stanford University Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have mapped out the bifurcating lineage choices that lead from pluripotency to 12 human mesodermal lineages, including bone, muscle, and heart. The experiments also defined the sets of biological and chemical signals necessary to quickly and efficiently direct pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into pure populations of any of 12 cell types. This is certainly a remarkable paper in many aspects, since Weissman and his group defined the extrinsic signals that control each binary lineage decision that occur during stem cell differentiation. This knowledge enables any lab to successfully block differentiation toward unwanted cell fates and rapidly steer pluripotent stem cells toward largely pure human mesodermal lineages at most of these differentiation branchpoints.

The ability to make pure populations of these cells within days rather than the weeks or months is one of the Holy Grails of regenerative medicine. Such abilities can, potentially, allow researchers and clinicians to make new beating heart cells to repair damage after a heart attack, or cartilage for osteoarthritic knees or hips, or bone to reinvigorate broken bones or malfunctioning joints, or heal from accidental or surgical trauma.

The Weissman study also highlights those key, but short-lived, patterns of gene expression that occur during human early embryonic segmentation. By mapping stepwise chromatin and single-cell gene expression changes during the somite segmentation stage of mesodermal development, the Weissman group discovered a previously unobservable human embryonic event transiently marked by expression of the HOPX gene. It turns out that these decisions made during human development rely on processes that are evolutionarily conserved among many animals. These insights may also lead to a better understanding of how congenital defects occur.

“Regenerative medicine relies on the ability to turn pluripotent human stem cells into specialized tissue stem cells that can engraft and function in patients,” said Irving Weissman of Stanford. “It took us years to be able to isolate blood-forming and brain-forming stem cells. Here we used our knowledge of the developmental biology of many other animal models to provide the positive and negative signaling factors to guide the developmental choices of these tissue and organ stem cells. Within five to nine days we can generate virtually all the pure cell populations that we need.”

All in all, this roadmap enables scientists to navigate mesodermal development to produce transplantable, human tissue progenitors, and uncover developmental processes.

This paper was published in the journal Cell: Irving L. Weissman et al., “Mapping the Pairwise Choices Leading from Pluripotency to Human Bone, Heart, and Other Mesoderm Cell Types,” Cell, July 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.06.011.

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).

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