Weissman Laboratory Define Roadmap for Pluripotent Human Stem Cell Differentiation into Mesodermal Fates: Cells Rapidly Generate Bone, Heart Muscle


How do we get stem cells to differentiate into the cell types we want? Implanting undifferentiated stem cells into a living organism can sometimes result in cells that differentiate into unwanted cell types. Such a phenomenon is called heterotropic differentiation and it is a genuine concern of regenerative medicine. What is a clinical researcher to do? Answer: make a road map of the events that drive cells to differentiate into specific cell types and their respective precursors.

Researchers in the laboratory of Irving Weissman at Stanford University Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have mapped out the bifurcating lineage choices that lead from pluripotency to 12 human mesodermal lineages, including bone, muscle, and heart. The experiments also defined the sets of biological and chemical signals necessary to quickly and efficiently direct pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into pure populations of any of 12 cell types. This is certainly a remarkable paper in many aspects, since Weissman and his group defined the extrinsic signals that control each binary lineage decision that occur during stem cell differentiation. This knowledge enables any lab to successfully block differentiation toward unwanted cell fates and rapidly steer pluripotent stem cells toward largely pure human mesodermal lineages at most of these differentiation branchpoints.

The ability to make pure populations of these cells within days rather than the weeks or months is one of the Holy Grails of regenerative medicine. Such abilities can, potentially, allow researchers and clinicians to make new beating heart cells to repair damage after a heart attack, or cartilage for osteoarthritic knees or hips, or bone to reinvigorate broken bones or malfunctioning joints, or heal from accidental or surgical trauma.

The Weissman study also highlights those key, but short-lived, patterns of gene expression that occur during human early embryonic segmentation. By mapping stepwise chromatin and single-cell gene expression changes during the somite segmentation stage of mesodermal development, the Weissman group discovered a previously unobservable human embryonic event transiently marked by expression of the HOPX gene. It turns out that these decisions made during human development rely on processes that are evolutionarily conserved among many animals. These insights may also lead to a better understanding of how congenital defects occur.

“Regenerative medicine relies on the ability to turn pluripotent human stem cells into specialized tissue stem cells that can engraft and function in patients,” said Irving Weissman of Stanford. “It took us years to be able to isolate blood-forming and brain-forming stem cells. Here we used our knowledge of the developmental biology of many other animal models to provide the positive and negative signaling factors to guide the developmental choices of these tissue and organ stem cells. Within five to nine days we can generate virtually all the pure cell populations that we need.”

All in all, this roadmap enables scientists to navigate mesodermal development to produce transplantable, human tissue progenitors, and uncover developmental processes.

This paper was published in the journal Cell: Irving L. Weissman et al., “Mapping the Pairwise Choices Leading from Pluripotency to Human Bone, Heart, and Other Mesoderm Cell Types,” Cell, July 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.06.011.

Patient-Specific Neurons Reveal Vital Clues About Autism


The brains of some people with autism spectrum disorder grow faster than usual early on in life, often before diagnosis. Now new research from scientists at the Salk Institute has used cutting-edge stem cell-based techniques to elucidate those mechanisms that drive excess brain growth, which affects as many as 30 percent of people with autism.

These findings show that it is possible to use stem cell reprogramming technologies to model the earliest stages of complex disorders and to evaluate potential therapeutic drugs. The Salk team, led by Alysson Muotri, discovered that stem cell-derived neurons, derived from stem cells that had been made from cells taken from autism patients, made fewer connections in culture compared to cells from healthy individuals. These same scientists also restored cell-cell communication between these cells by adding a growth factor called IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1). IGF-1 is in the process of being evaluated in clinical trials of autism.

“This technology allows us to generate views of neuron development that have historically been intractable,” said senior investigator Fred H. Gage. “We’re excited by the possibility of using stem cell methods to unravel the biology of autism and to possibly screen for new drug treatments for this debilitating disorder.”

In the United States alone, autism affects approximately one out of every 68 children. Autistic children have problems communicating, show an inhibited ability to interact with others, and usually engage in repetitive behaviors. Mind you, the symptomatic manifestations in autistic children can vary dramatically in type and severity. Autism, to date, has no known, identified cause.

In 2010, Gage and collaborators recreated features of Rett syndrome (a rare disorder that shares features of autism but is caused by mutations in a single gene; MECP2) in a cell culture system. They extracted skin cells from Rett Syndrome patients and converted those cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Then Gage and others differentiated those Rett-Syndrome-specific iPSCs into neurons, which they grew in culture. These neurons were then studied in detail in a neuron-specific culture system. “In that study, induced pluripotent stem cells gave us a window into the birth of a neuron that we would not otherwise have,” said Marchetto, the study’s first author. “Seeing features of Rett syndrome in a dish gave us the confidence to next study classical autism.”

In this new study, Gage and others created iPSCs from autism patients whose brains had grown up to 23 percent faster than usual during toddlerhood but had subsequently normalized. These iPSCs were then differentiated into neuron precursor cells (NPCs). Examinations of these NPCs revealed that the NPCs made from iPSCs derived from autism patients proliferated faster than those derived from typically developing individuals. This finding supports a theory advanced by some experts that brain enlargement is caused by disruptions to the cell’s normal cycle of division, according to Marchetto.

In addition, the neurons derived from autism-specific iPSCs behaved abnormally in culture. They fired less often compared with those cells derived from healthy people. The activity of these neurons, however, improved if they were treated with IGF-1. IGF-1 enhances the formation of cell-cell connections between neurons, and the establishment and stabilization of these connections seem to normalize neuronal function.

Muotri and Gage and others plan to use these patient-derived cells to elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind IGF-1’s effects. They will examine changes in gene expression and attempt to correlate them with changes in neuronal function. Although the newly derived cells are far from the patients’ brains, a brain cell by itself may, hopefully, reveal important clues about a person and their brain.

This work was published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry: M. C. Marchetto et al., “Altered proliferation and networks in neural cells derived from idiopathic autistic individuals,” Molecular Psychiatry, 2016; DOI: 10.1038/mp.2016.95.

Beta-Integrin Implicated In Slow Healing Of Aged Muscles


With age, the function and regenerative abilities of skeletal muscles decrease. Therefore, the elderly can find it difficult to recover from injury or surgery.

A new study from the laboratory of Chen-Ming Fan from Johns Hopkins University has shown that a protein called β1-integrin is crucial for muscle regeneration. β1-integrin seems to provide a promising target for therapeutic intervention to combat muscle aging or disease.

Muscle stem cells are the primary source of muscle regeneration after muscle injury from exercise, accidents, or surgery. These specialized adult stem cells lie dormant in the muscle tissue, and muscles even have them stored off to the side of the individual muscle fibers. Because of their location, these muscle stem cells are known as muscle “satellite cells.” After damage, these satellite cells awaken and proliferate, and go on to make new muscle fibers and restore muscle function. Some satellite cells return to dormancy, which allows the muscle to keep a reservoir of healing cells that can repair the muscle over and over again. Fan and her colleagues determined that proteins called integrins, and in particular, β1-integrin, are integral for maintaining the cycle of hibernation, activation, proliferation, and then return to hibernation, in muscle stem cells.

Integrins are cell surface proteins that provide tight connections between cells and the immediate external environment.

Integrin Dimer Structure: Globular domain structures of α and β subunits in a stable dimer. Ligand binding happens at the interface of the αI (left panel) or β-propeller (right panel) and the βI domain.
Integrin Dimer Structure: Globular domain structures of α and β subunits in a stable dimer. Ligand binding happens at the interface of the αI (left panel) or β-propeller (right panel) and the βI domain.

Without integrins, almost every stage of the regeneration is disrupted. Fan and her group predicted that defects in β1-integrin likely contribute to aging, which is associated with reduced muscle stem cell function and decreased quantities of muscle stem cells. This means that healing after injury or surgery is very slow, which can cause a long period of immobility and an accompanying loss of muscle mass. Inefficient muscular healing in the elderly is a significant clinical problem. Therapeutic approaches would be quite welcome by the aging population and their physicians. One way to improve muscle regeneration would be to stimulate muscle satellite cells in older individuals.

Fan and others determined that β1-integrin function is diminished in aged muscle stem cells. When they artificially activated integrins in aged mice, their regenerative abilities were restored to youthful levels. Improvement in regeneration, strength, and function were also seen when this treatment was applied to animals with muscular dystrophy, which underscores the potential importance of such an approach for the treatment of muscle disorders.

Muscle stem cells use β1-integrin to interact with many other proteins in the external environment of the muscle. Among this forest of proteins in the external environment of the muscle, Fan and her coworkers found one called fibronectin that might be the most relevant. They discovered that aged muscles contain substantially less fibronectin compared to young muscles. Like β1-integrin, eliminating fibronectin from young muscles makes them function as though they were old. However, restoring fibronectin to aged muscle tissue restores muscle regeneration to youthful levels. Fan’s group demonstrated a strong link between β1-integrin, fibronectin and muscle stem cell regeneration.

Taken together, the results show that aged muscle stem cells with compromised β1-integrin activity and aged muscles with insufficient amount of fibronectin both root causes of muscle aging. This makes β1-integrin and fibronectin very promising therapeutic targets.

This work appeared in the following journal: Michelle Rozo et al., “Targeting β1-integrin signaling enhances regeneration in aged and dystrophic muscle in mice,” Nature Medicine, 2016; DOI: 10.1038/nm.4116.

Insulin-Producing Beta Cell Subtypes May Impact Diabetes Treatment


Researchers from the Oregon Stem Cell Center in Portland, Oregon have demonstrated the existence of at least four separate subtypes of human insulin-producing beta cells that may be important in the understanding and treatment of diabetes.

“This study marks the first description of several different kinds of human insulin producing beta cells,” said Markus Grompe of the Oregon Stem Cell Center at Oregon Health Science University. “Some of the cells are better at releasing insulin than others, whereas others may regenerate quicker. Therefore, it is possible that people with different percentages of the subtypes are more prone to diabetes. Further understanding of cell characteristics could be the key to uncovering new treatment options, as well as the reason why some people are diabetic and others are not.”

Diabetes mellitus affects more than 29 million people in the United States. There are two main types of diabetes mellitus, type I and type II. Type I diabetes mellitus is caused by insufficient production of insulin. Type II diabetes mellitus is caused by insulin resistance or the inability of the body to properly respond to the insulin produced by the body. Type I diabetes mellitus results from dysfunction or loss of insulin producing beta cells in the endocrine portion of the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body keep normal blood sugar levels, and incorporate sugar in the bloodstream into cells to grow and repair tissues. Previously, only a single variety of beta cell was known to exist. However, using human pancreatic islets, or clusters of up to 4,000 cells, Grompe and colleagues identified a method to identify and isolate four distinct types of beta cells. They also found that hundreds of genes were differently expressed between cell subtypes and that these distinct beta cell subtypes produced different amounts of insulin.

All type 2 diabetics had abnormal percentages of the subtypes, suggesting a possible role in the disease process. Additional research is needed to determine how different forms of diabetes – and other diseases – affect the new cell subtypes, as well as how researchers may take advantage of these differences for medical treatment.

This work was published in: Craig Dorrell et al., “Human islets contain four distinct subtypes of β cells,” Nature Communications, 2016; 7: 11756 DOI: 10.1038/ ncomms11756.

New Study Validates Cellular Bone Allograft Technology


In a study in laboratory rats that had defects in their femurs (upper leg bone) showed new bone formation after they were treated with adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells that had been seeded on demineralized bone matrix and implanted.  Implanted stem cells were detected for up to 84 days in areas of new formation and had differentiated within the bony repair tissue.

According to AlloSource, the procedures used similar technology to the company’s AlloStem Cellular Bone Allograft process.

Surgical oncologist Nicole Ehrhart of Colorado State University presented these data at the State of Spine Surgery annual symposium and at the Korean American Spine Society meeting.

AlloStem is partially demineralized allograft bone combined with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.  AlloStem is suitable for general bone grafting applications, and is similar to autograft bone because it provides the three key properties necessary for bone formation: osteoconduction, osteoinduction and osteogenesis.

Ehrhart’s study has been accepted for publication in Journal of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering.

AlloSource provides 200 types of precise cartilage, cellular, bone, skin and soft-tissue allografts.

STEMTRA Trial Tests The Efficacy of Genetically-Modified SB623 Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Stroke Patients


SanBio, Inc., has announced the randomization of the first patient in their STEMTRA Phase 2 clinical trial study for traumatic brain injury. The STEMTRA trial is presently enrolling patients in both the United States and Japan, and the first patient was randomized at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Ga.

STEMTRA stands for “Stem cell therapy for traumatic brain injury,” and this trial will examine the effects of SB623 stem cells to treat patients with chronic motor deficits that result from traumatic brain injury (TBI).

SB623, a proprietary product of SanBio, are bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells that have been genetically engineered to express the intracellular domain of Notch-1. When injected into neural tissue, SB623 cells seem to reverse neural damage. Since SB623 cells come from donors, a single donor’s cells can be used to treat thousands of patients. In cell culture and animal models, SB623 cells restore function to neurons damaged by strokes, spinal cord injury and Parkinson’s disease. There have been no serious adverse events attributable to the cell therapy product and patients benefit on all three stroke scales.

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can be caused by a wide range of events, including falls, fights, car accidents, gunshot wounds to the head, blows to the head from falling objects, and battlefield injuries. These events often result in permanent damage, including significant motor deficits; leaving more than 5.3 million people living with disabilities in the United States alone.

Damien Bates of SanBio, said, “This modified stem cell treatment has improved outcomes in patients with persistent limb weakness secondary to ischemic stroke. Our preclinical data suggest it may also help TBI patients. For people suffering from the often debilitating effects of TBI, this milestone brings us one step closer to proving whether it’s an effective treatment option.”

The STEMTRA trial follows a Phase 1/2a clinical trial in patients afflicted with chronic motor deficit secondary as a result of an ischemic stroke were treated with SB623 cells. In this trial, SB623 cells statistically significantly improved motor function following implantation. The STEMTRA study will evaluate the tolerability, efficacy, and safety of the SB623 cell treatment and the administration process in those patients who have suffered a TBI.  As a Phase 2 trial, STEMTRA will evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of intracranial administration of SB623 cells in patients with chronic motor deficit from TBI.

STEMTRA will be conducted across approximately 25 clinical trial sites throughout the United States and five sites in Japan. Total enrollment is expected to reach 52 patients in total, and all enrolled patients must have suffered their TBI at least 12 months ago.