Fat-Based Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Matrix Heals Bronchopleural Fistula in Female Cancer Patient


Bronchopleural fistulae, mercifully abbreviated as BPF, refers to an opening or hole in the respiratory tree that causes continuity between the pleural space that surrounds the lungs and the bronchial tree. BPH is a highly feared complication of surgery on the respiratory system.

BPH can complicate surgical resection of the pulmonary system. Patients with lung cancers may require lung resection in order to remove tumorous lung tissue. The rate of BPH incidence after lung surgery varies widely, with reported incidences ranging from 1.5 to 28%. Necrosis or death of lung tissue as a result of infection can also cause BPH, as can tuberculosis. Chemotherapy or radiation therapy for lung cancers can also result in BPF. Finally, BPF may caused by persistent spontaneous pneumothorax, which refers to an abnormal build up of air or other gases in the pleural space, which causes an uncoupling of the lung from the chest wall.

To date, treatment for BPF is only partially effectively. The main treatment includes surgery, but the rate of recurrence of the fistulae remains rather high as do the rate of mortality. Can stem cells show us a better way?

Perhaps they can. Dennis A. Wigle, a surgeon at Mayo Clinic, and his collaborators used a synthetic bioabsorbable matrix seeded with the patients one fat-based mesenchymal stem cells to heal a BPF in a 63-yr old woman. Mind you, this is a case study (the lowest quality clinical evidence) and not a controlled study,. However, the success of this case study is at least suggestive that such an approach might prove useful for patients who suffer from BPFs.

Microscopic assessment of matrix cell seeding. (A): Ethidium bromide (red) and Syto-13 (green) costain demonstrating live and dead cells on mesenchymal stem cell seeding on matrix. (B): Confocal microscopy with CD90 (Thy-1) fluorescein isothiocyanate (green) and Hoechst 33342 (trihydrochloride trihydrate) (blue) fluorescent nuclear staining. These images were captured using a ×20 objective and a ×10 eyepiece, for a combined magnification of ×200. Scale bar = 150 µm.
Microscopic assessment of matrix cell seeding. (A): Ethidium bromide (red) and Syto-13 (green) costain demonstrating live and dead cells on mesenchymal stem cell seeding on matrix. (B): Confocal microscopy with CD90 (Thy-1) fluorescein isothiocyanate (green) and Hoechst 33342 (trihydrochloride trihydrate) (blue) fluorescent nuclear staining. These images were captured using a ×20 objective and a ×10 eyepiece, for a combined magnification of ×200. Scale bar = 150 µm.

A 63-yr old woman who had surgical resection of the lung in order to treat her lung cancer had, as a consequence of her surgery, a BPF. Some 30 different surgical attempts were made to repair the BPF, but all of them failed. The woman’s health declined and her medical team started to think of alternative treatments.

Fortunately, Mayo Clinic has been participating in an ongoing clinical trial to use fat-based mesenchymal stem cells to treat anal fistulae in Crohn’s disease patients. Therefore Dr. Wigle and his team considered using the protocol utilized with Crohn’s patients to repair this woman’s BPF.

Fat biopsies were taken from the patient and the fat was washed, minced, digested with enzymes, and then grown in special culture media. The adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) grew and were isolated, characterized and shown to be MSCs.

These cells were then seeded on a matrix of synthetic bioabsorbable poly(glycolide-trimethylene carbonate) copolymer and then placed in a bioreactor to grow. After about 4 days, the matrix was flush with AD-MSCs, and this cell-seeded patch was then used in a subsequent surgery to seal the opening in the respiratory tree. This time the surgery worked. The patient was discharged 25 days after the surgery and sent home.

MRIs of the respiratory system showed that the BPF had indeed closed and properly resolved.

Preoperative imaging showing size and location of fistula, and postoperative imaging demonstrating disease resolution. (A): Preoperative bronchoscopy demonstrating large bronchopleural fistula (BPF) cavity and lateral extension of fistula tracts. (B): Postoperative bronchoscopy (3 months) demonstrating progressive healing of BPF site. (C): Preoperative computed tomography scan demonstrating large BPF with connection to atmosphere (additional axial slices inferiorly). (D): Postoperative computed tomography scan (16 months) demonstrating resolution of BPF.
Preoperative imaging showing size and location of fistula, and postoperative imaging demonstrating disease resolution. (A): Preoperative bronchoscopy demonstrating large bronchopleural fistula (BPF) cavity and lateral extension of fistula tracts. (B): Postoperative bronchoscopy (3 months) demonstrating progressive healing of BPF site. (C): Preoperative computed tomography scan demonstrating large BPF with connection to atmosphere (additional axial slices inferiorly). (D): Postoperative computed tomography scan (16 months) demonstrating resolution of BPF.

This case study might confirm what was previously observed in large animal studies by Petrella and others, namely that AD-MSCs can be used to heal BPF. Petrella and others theorized that implanted MSCs induce the proliferation of fibroblasts that then deposit collagen, which seals the BPF (see Ann Thorac Surg 97:480483.  Alternatively, AD-MSCs might differentiate into cell types  required for regeneration of the airways (Dominici M, and others, Cytotherapy 8:315317).  Either way, this paper seems to suggest that AD-MSCs can be isolated from a patient’s fat (even a very sick patient like this one) without incident and used for tissue engineering applications that can repair very serious wound like BPF. 

This paper was published in: Johnathon M., Aho, et Al., “Closure of a Recurrent Bronchopleural Fistula Using a Matrix Seeded With Patient-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.” Stem Cells Trans Med October 2016 vol. 5 no. 10 1375-1379. 

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).