Inhibition of AKT Kinase Increases Umbilical Cord Blood Growth in Culture and Engraftment in Mice


Dr. Yan Liu from the Department of Pediatrics and the Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Indiana and his colleagues have increased the engraftment efficiency of umbilical cord hematopoietic (blood cell-making) stem cells in immunodeficient mice. The technique developed by Lui and his colleagues is simple and increases the proliferation of umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (UCB-HSCs) in culture, which potentially solves several long-standing problems with umbilical cord blood transplantation.

Umbilical cord blood has been used in the clinic for more than 40 years in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapies to treat patients with bone marrow diseases or to reconstitute the bone of those cancer patients who had to have theirs wiped out to cure their leukemia or lymphoma.

One of the problems with umbilical cord blood transplantations, however, is the small amount of material in a typical cord blood collection and, therefore, the small number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) available for transplantation. To ameliorate these shortcomings, hematologists will transplant more than one lot of cord blood (a so-called “double umbilical cord blood transplantation”), which, unfortunately, also increases the risk of immunological rejection (so-called Graft Versus Host response).

A second strategy to get around the low numbers of UCB-HSCs is to expand them in culture, which has proven difficult. However, some experiments have given us more than enough hope to suspect this this is a feasible option (see Flores-Guzmán P, et al., Stem Cells Transl Med. 2013 Nov;2(11):830-8; Bari S., et al., Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2015 Jun;21(6):1008-1; Pineault N, Abu-Khader A. Exp Hematol. 2015 Jul;43(7):498-513).

Dr. Lui and his coworkers wanted to examine the role of the signaling protein AKT (also known and protein kinase B) in UCB-HSC expansion in culture. To this end, they used silencing RNAs to knock-down AKT gene expression in cultured UCB-HSCs. AKT knock-down enhanced UCB-HSC quiescence and growth in culture. In a separate experiment, Lui and others treated human UCB-HSCs (so-called CD34+ cells) with a chemical that specifically inhibits AKT activity. Then they subjected these cells to a battery of tests in culture and in laboratory mice.

The results were astounding.  Treatment of human UCB-HSCs did not affect the identity of the HSCs and enhanced their ability to form isolated colonies in cell culture growth tests known as “replating assays.”  Additionally, the short-term inhibition of AKT with drugs also enhanced the ability of UBC-HSCs to repopulate the bone marrow of immunodeficient mice.

ubc-hsc-engraftment-improved-with-akt-inhibition

In summary, inhibition of AKT increases human UCB-HSC quiescence, growth potential, and engraftment in laboratory mice.

These interesting pre-clinical results suggest that AKT inhibitor can increase the expansion of UCB-HSCs in culture and potential increase their tendency of these cells to engraft in patients.

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Published by

mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).