Capricor Therapeutics Enrolls Patients in HOPE Clinical Trial


The Beverly Hills-based biotechnology company Capricor Therapeutics, Inc. (CAPR) has announced the enrollment of 25 patients for their randomized Phase 1/2 HOPE-Duchenne clinical trial.

“HOPE” stands for “Halt cardiomyOPathy progrEssion in Duchenne” Muscular Dystrophy. The HOPE trial will evaluate the company’s CAP-1002 investigational cardiac cell therapy in patients suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)-associated cardiomyopathy. If all goes as planned, CAPR expects to the first data points from this trial in six months (first quarter of 2017).

DMD most seriously affects skeletal muscle, but the disease can also devastate heart muscle. In fact, the most common cause of death from DMD results from the consequences of the disease on heart muscle.

The HOPE trial will assess the safety and efficacy of CAP-1002 in these 25 patients.

In DMD patients, scar tissue gradually accumulates in the heart, which leads to a deterioration of cardiac function.

CAP-1002 consists of cells donated from the hearts of healthy volunteers. These “cardiosphere-derived cells” or CDCs, have been shown by work in the laboratory of Dr. Eduardo Marbán, Director of the Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, to reduce scar tissue in damaged hearts and improve heart function in studies with laboratory animals. Furthermore, a clinical study with CDCs, the CADUCEUS study, showed that the reduction of heart scar tissue in patients given infusions of CDCs. Therefore CAD-1002 might be the only therapeutic agent that can potentially reduce scar tissue in the damaged heart.

The HOPE trial enrolled 25 boys with DMD who were at least 12 years of age at the time of screening and who show signs of DMD-associated cardiomyopathy. These boys all have significant scar tissue in at least four left ventricular segments, according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.

Of these 25 subjects, 13 subjects were randomly assigned to receive CAP-1002 by means of intracoronary infusion into each of the three main coronary arteries in a single procedure.

The 12 subjects randomized to the control arm received usual care and received no such infusion.

Efficacy of CAD-1002 will be assessed by means of specified secondary outcome measures that include absolute and relative changes in cardiac scar tissue and cardiac function as measured by MRI, performance on the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) and the Performance of the Upper Limb (PUL), and scoring on the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL).

The HOPE trial is a multicenter study; it is being conducted at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, Calif., and the University of Florida in Gainesville, Fla.

DMD is a genetically inherited condition. The dystrophin gene that is abnormal in DMD patients is on the X chromosome, and therefore, the vast majority of DMD patients are male. DMD afflicts approximately 20,000 boys and young men in the U.S. The dystrophin complex is a structural component of muscles, integral to the integrity of muscle fibers. Abnormalities in dystrophin leads to chronic skeletal and cardiac muscle damage.

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mburatov

Professor of Biochemistry at Spring Arbor University (SAU) in Spring Arbor, MI. Have been at SAU since 1999. Author of The Stem Cell Epistles. Before that I was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA (1997-1999), and Sussex University, Falmer, UK (1994-1997). I studied Cell and Developmental Biology at UC Irvine (PhD 1994), and Microbiology at UC Davis (MA 1986, BS 1984).