Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Bone Cancer Patients Provide Crucial Insights into the Genesis of Bone Cancer


A team of Mount Sinai researchers have utilized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to elucidate the genetic changes that seem to convert a well-known anti-cancer signaling gene into a driver bone cancers. When it comes to bone cancers, the survival rate has not improved in 40 years despite advances in treatment. Since this study might provide new targets and suggest new strategies for attacking such cancers. it represents a welcome addition to the cancer literature.

This study, which was published in the journal Cell, revolves around iPSCs, which were discovered in 2006 by Nobel laureate Shinya Yamanaka. iPSCs use genetic engineering and cell culture techniques to reprogram mature, adult cells to become like embryonic stem cells. These iPSCs are “pluripotent,” which means that they are able to differentiate into any adult cell type and can also divide in culture indefinitely.

For therapeutic purposes, iPSCs can be derived from a patient’s own cells, differentiated into the cells the patient needs to be replaced, and then implanted into the patient’s body to augment tissue healing or even organ reconstruction. Since iPSCs can be successfully differentiated into heart muscle, nerve cells, bone, and other cell types, they have the potential advance the field of regenerative medicine by leaps and bounds.

iPSCs have already made their presence known in the clinic by serving as model systems for research and diagnosis. The new Mount Sinai study used iPSCs to construct an accurate model of a genetic disease “in a dish.” The culture dishes contain self-renewing patient-specific iPSCs or a specific cell line that enable in-depth study diseases that are driven by each person’s genetic differences. When matched with patient records, iPSCs and iPSC-derived target cells have the ability to help physicians predict a patient’s prognosis and whether or not a given drug will be effective for him or her.

In this study, skin cells from healthy patients and patients with a genetic disease called Li-Fraumeni syndrome were isolated and reprogrammed into patient-specific iPSC lines. These iPSCs were then differentiated into bone-making cells (osteoblasts), which are the cells where particular rare and common bone cancers start. Li-Fraumeni syndrome greatly predisposes patients to a variety of cancers in several different types of tissues.

The patient-derived osteoblasts were then tested for their tendencies to become tumor cells and to make bone. This particular bone cancer model did a better job of recapitulating the characteristics of bone cancer than previously used mouse or cellular models.

LFS iPSCs for stem cell production

“Our study is among the first to use induced pluripotent stem cells as the foundation of a model for cancer,” said lead author Dung-Fang Lee, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “This model, when combined with a rare genetic disease, revealed for the first time how a protein known to prevent tumor growth in most cases, p53, may instead drive bone cancer when genetic changes cause too much of it to be made in the wrong place.”

The Mount Sinai disease model research uses a simple fact of human life as its basis: human genes undergo mutations at a certain rate that tends to increase as we age, and the formation of new mutations in relentless and constant. Some mutations make no difference, a few some confer advantages, and others cause disease. Beyond inherited mutations that contribute to cancer risk, the combination of random, accumulated DNA changes in our cells as we age also increase our cancer risk.

The current study focused on those genetic pathways involved in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome or LFS, a rare genetic disease that causes high risk for many cancers in affected families. Osteosarcoma (bone cancer) is a common cancer observed in LFS patients and many of them are diagnosed before the age of 30. Additionally, osteosarcoma is the most common type of bone cancer in all children, and after leukemia, the second leading cause of cancer death for them.

 

Importantly, about 70 percent of LFS families have a mutation in their copy of a genes called TP53, which encodes the p53 protein. P53 is a “the tumor suppressor,” which means that it functions to preserve the integrity of the genome and keep the rate of cell division in check. Common forms of osteosarcoma, which are driven by somatic or inherited mutations, have also been closely linked by past studies to defects in p53 when mutations interfere with the ability of the protein to function properly.

p53

Crystal Structure of p53 protein bound to DNA

 

Rare genetic diseases like LFS provide excellent model systems because they tend to result from a change in a single gene, instead of the diverse and overlapping mutations observed in common diseases, and, in this case, more common, non-inherited bone cancers. The LFS-iPSC based modeling highlights the contribution of p53 alone to osteosarcoma.

By analyzing iPSC lines, and bone cancer driven by p53 mutations in LFS patients, the Munt Sinai research team showed, for the first time, that the LFS bone cancer results from an overactive p53 gene. Too much p53 in osteoblasts dampens the function of a gene, H19, and a related protein, decorin, that would otherwise help stem cells differentiate into normal osteoblasts.

The inability of cells to differentiate makes them vulnerable to genetic mistakes that drive cancer, since more “stemness” means a tendency toward rapid, abnormal growth, like that observed in tumors. One tragic feature of osteosarcoma is the rapid, error-prone production of weaker bone by cancerous bone-making cells, where a young person surprisingly breaks a bone to reveal undiagnosed, advanced cancer.

Dung-Fang Lee and his colleagues discovered that the H19 gene seems to control a network of interconnected genes that fine-tune the balance between cell growth and resistance to growth. Decorin is a protein that is part of connective tissue like bone, but that also plays a signaling role, interacting with growth factors to slow the rate that cells divide and multiply, unless turned off by too much p53.

“Our experiments showed that restoring H19 expression hindered by too much p53 restored “protective differentiation” of osteoblasts to counter events of tumor growth early on in bone cancer,” said co-author, Ihor Lemischka, PhD, Director of The Black Family Stem Cell Institute within the Icahn School of Medicine. “The work has implications for the future treatment or prevention of LFS-associated osteosarcoma, and possibly for all forms of bone cancer driven by p53 mutations, with H19 and p53 established now as potential targets for future drugs.”

Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells Make Robust Blood Vessel Networks


The growth of new blood vessels in culture received in new boost from researchers at Rice University and Texas Children’s Hospital who used stem cells from amniotic fluid to promote the growth of robust, functional blood vessels in healing hydrogels.

These results were published in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A.

Engineer Jeffrey Jacot thinks that amniotic fluid stem cells are valuable for regenerative medicine because of their ability to differentiate into many other types of cells, including endothelial cells that form blood vessels. Amniotic fluid stem cells are taken from the discarded membranes in which babies are encased in before birth. Jacot and others combined these cells with an injectable hydrogel that acted as a scaffold.

In previous experiments, Jacot and his colleagues used amniotic fluid cells from pregnant women to help heal infants born with congenital heart defects. Amniotic fluids, drawn during standard tests, are generally discarded but show promise for implants made from a baby’s own genetically matched material.

“The main thing we’ve figured out is how to get a vascularized device: laboratory-grown tissue that is made entirely from amniotic fluid cells,” Jacot said. “We showed it’s possible to use only cells derived from amniotic fluid.”

Researchers from Rice, Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine combined amniotic fluid stem cells with a hydrogel made from polyethylene glycol and fibrin. Fibrin is the proteins formed during blood clots, but it is also used for cellular-matrix interactions, wound healing and angiogenesis (the process by which new vessels are made). Fibrin is widely used as a bioscaffold but it suffers from low mechanical stiffness and is degraded rapidly in the body. When fibrin was combined with polyethylene glycol, the hydrogel became much more robust, according to Jacot.

Additionally, these groups used a growth factor called vascular endothelial growth factor to induce the stem cells to differentiate into endothelial cells. Furthermore, when induced in the presence of fibrin, these cells infiltrated the native vasculature from neighboring tissue to make additional blood vessels.

When mice were injected with fibrin-only hydrogels, thin fibril structures formed. However if those same hydrogels were infused with amniotic fluid stem cells that had been induced with vascular endothelial growth factor, the cell/fibrin hydrogel concoctions showed far more robust vasculature.

In similar experiments with hydrogels seeded with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, once again, vascular growth was observed, but these vessels did not have the guarantee of a tissue match. Interestingly, seeding with endothelial cells didn’t work as well as the researchers expected, he said.

Jacot and others will continue to study the use of amniotic stem cells to build biocompatible patches for the hearts of infants born with birth defects and for other procedures.

Dead Heart Muscle Regrown in Rodents


If you cut a piece of tissue from the heart of a salamander or zebrafish, they wild simply grow new heart tissue. Unfortunately, humans are unable to easily regenerate heart cells, and this males it difficult to recover from the permanent damage caused by heart attacks.

Fortunately, life scientists from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel and the Victor Chang Institute in Sydney have discovered a way to stimulate heart muscle cells in mammals to grow. This finding could have major implications for future heart attack sufferers.

Even though human blood, hair and skin cells renew themselves throughout life, cell division in the heart comes to a virtual standstill shortly after birth, according to Prof. Richard Harvey, from the Victor Chang cardiac research institute, and one of the authors of this research. Harvey said, “So there’s always been an intense interest in the mechanism salamanders and fish use which makes them capable of heart regeneration, and one thing they do is send their cardiomyocytes, or muscle cells, into a dormant state, which they then come out of to go into a proliferative state, which means they start dividing rapidly and replacing lost cardiomyocytes.”

Harvey continued: “There are various theories why the human heart can not do that, one being that our more sophisticated immune system has come at a cost, and because human cardiomyocytes are in a deeper state of quiescence, that has made it very difficult to stimulate them to divide.”

Today, for the first time in history, more people in developing countries die from strokes and heart attacks than infectious diseases. Fortunately there are cost-effective ways to save lives

By studying mice, Harvey and his colleagues found a way to overcome that regenerative barrier – at least in the rodents.

Harvey and others found that by stimulating a cell signaling pathway in the heart that is driven by a hormone called neuregulin, heart muscle cells divided in a spectacular way in both adolescent and adult mice. In humans, neuregulin expression is usually muted about one week after birth, and by about 20 weeks after birth in mice.

By triggering of the neuregulin pathway following a heart attack in mice, Harvey and others induced the replacement of lost muscle, which repaired the heart to a level close to that prior to the heart attack. Harvey said that he and other scientists should be able to determine with in the next five years if it is possible to replicate these results in humans.

“This is such a significant finding that it will harness research activities in many labs around the world, and there will be much more attention now on how this neuregulin-response could be maximised,” Harvey said.

“We will now examine what else we can use, other than genes, to activate that pathway, and it could be that there are already drugs out there, used for other conditions and regarded as safe, that can trigger this response in humans.”

When one of the blood vessels that provide blood to the heart muscle becomes blocked, the patient suffers a heart attack. Heart attacks or “myocardial infractions” cause billions of cardiomyocytes to die. Even if you survive a heart attack, you usually experience diminished quality of life because of it.

“The dream is that one day we will be able to regenerate damaged heart tissue, much like a salamander can regrow a new limb if it is bitten off by a predator,” Harvey said.

Molecular biologist Gabriele D’Uva lead this research, which was published in the scientific journal Nature Cell Biology.

Forcing Sugars on the Surfaces of Cord Blood Cell Increases Their Engraftment


When a child or adult needs new bone marrow, a bone marrow transplant from a donor is usually the only way to save their life. Without properly functioning bone marrow, the patient’s blood cells will die off, and there will be too few red blood cells to ferry oxygen to tissues or white blood cells to fight off infections.

An alternative to bone marrow from a bone marrow donor if umbilical cord blood. Umbilical cord blood does not require the rigorous tissue matching that bone marrow requires because the blood making stem cells from cord blood are immature and not as likely to cause tissue rejection reactions.. However, umbilical cord blood cells suffer from two drawbacks: low numbers of stem cells in cord blood and poor engraftment efficiencies.

Fortunately, some progress has been made at expanding blood-making stem cells from umbilical cord blood, and it is likely that such technologies might be ready for common use in the future. As to the poor engraftment efficiencies, a new paper in the journal Blood from the laboratory of Elizabeth J. Shpall at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston, Texas reports a new way to increase cord blood stem cells engraftment efficiencies.

As previously discusses, delayed engraftment is one of the major limitations of cord blood transplantation (CBT). Delayed engraftment seems to be due to the diminished ability of the cord blood stem cells to home to the bone marrow. How are cells channeled to the bone marrow? A protein receptor called P- and E-selectins is expressed on the surfaces of bone marrow blood vessels. Cells that can bind these selectin receptors will pass from the circulation to the bone marrow. Thus binding selectin receptors is kind of like having the “password” for the bone marrow.

What does it take to bind the selectin proteins? Selectins bind to specific sugars that have been attached to proteins. These sugars are called “fucose” sugars. As it turns out, cord blood stem cells do not express robust levels of these fucosylated proteins. Could increasing the levels of fucosylated proteins on the surfaces of cord blood stem cells increase their engraftment? Shpall and her colleagues tested this hypothesis in patients with blood-based cancers.

Patients with blood cancers had their cancer-producing bone marrow stem cells destroyed with drugs and radiation. Then these same patients had their bone marrows refurbished with two units of umbilical cord blood. However, these cells in these cord blood units were treated with the enzyme fucosyltransferase-VI and guanosine diphosphate fucose for 30 minutes before transplantation. This treatment should have increased the content of fucosylated proteins on the surfaces of cells in the hope of enhancing their interaction with Selectin receptors on the surfaces of bone marrow capillaries.

The results of 22 patients enrolled in the trial were then compared with those for 31 historical controls who had undergone double unmanipulated CBT. There was a clear decrease in the length of time it took for cells to engraft into the bone marrow.  For example, the median time to neutrophil (a type of white blood cell) engraftment was 17 days (range 12-34) compared to 26 days (range, 11-48) for controls (P=0.0023). Platelet (a cell used in blood clotting) engraftment was also improved: median 35 days (range, 18-100) compared to 45 days (range, 27-120) for controls (P=0.0520).  These are significant differences.

These findings support show that treating cord blood cells with a rather inexpensive cocktail of enzymes for a short period of time before transplantation is a clinically feasible means to improve engraftment efficiency of CBT.  This is a small study.  Therefore, these data, though very hopeful, must be confirmed with larger studies.

Stem Cell Structure and Obesity


New research conducted at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has discovered that the regulation of the length of primary cilia, which are small hair-like projections on the surfaces of most cells, can prevent the production of fat cells taken from adult human bone marrow. Such a discovery might be used to develop a way of preventing obesity.

What are primary cilia?  For many years, almost all attention was focused on cilia that moved because their function was readily observable.  However, Alexander Kowalevsky first reported in 1867 the presence of single (nonmotile) cilia in a variety of vertebrate cells.  These solitary and nonmotile cilia are far more widespread than the motile type.  In humans, only a few cell types have motile cilia, namely epithelial cells in the bronchi and oviducts, and ependymal cells that line brain vesicles.  However, virtually all other cells have a primary cilium.

What makes primary cilia different from the motile form? First, they lack the central pair of microtubules, which would explain the lack of motility.  Primary cilia also seem to lack dynein, one of the molecular motors needed for motility.  In addition, some primary cilia do not project beyond the cell surface, and most, but not all, are very short.  What do these organelles do if they are not sticking out of the cell, or motile?

Further work has shown that primary cilia are important in intracellular transport and also in sensory function for cells.  Now it seems that primary cilia are also important in the process of adipogenesis.

Primary cilia

Adipogenesis refers to the differentiation of stem cells into fat cells. The QMUL research team showed that during adipogenesis, the length of primary cilia increases, which increases the movement of specific proteins associated with the cilia. When the QMUL team genetically restricted primary cilia elongation by genetic means, they were able to stop the formation of new fat cells.

One of the lead authors or this study, Melis Dalbay, said that it was the first time that subtle changes in primary cilia structure can influence the differentiation of stem cells into fat.

Since the length of primary cilia can be influenced by various factors including pharmaceuticals, inflammation and even mechanical forces, this study provides new insight into the regulation of fat cell formation and obesity.

This research points toward a new type of treatment known as “cilia-therapy” where manipulation of primary cilia may be used in the future to treat a growing range of conditions including obesity, cancer, inflammation and arthritis.

Safer Culture Conditions for Stem Cells


Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Institute is the senior author of a very important study that examined the culture conditions for pluripotent stem cells.

Several scientists have discovered that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can accumulate cancer-causing mutations when grown in culture for extended periods of time (for example, see Uri Weissbein, Nissim Benvenisty, and Uri Ben-David, J Cell Biol. 2014 Jan 20; 204(2): 153–163). However, some laboratories have managed to keep ESCs in culture for extended periods without observing instabilities.

To try to tease apart why this might be the case, Loring and her group examined various culture methods and determined that some stem cell culture methods are associated with increased incidence of mutations in the DNA of stem cells.

“This is about quality control; we’re making sure these cells are safe and effective,” said Loring, who is a professor of developmental neurobiology at Scripps Research Institute (SRI) in San Diego, CA.

All cells run the risk of accumulating mutations when they divide, but previous research from Loring and her colleagues showed that particular culture conditions could potentially select for faster growth and mutations that accelerate growth. Such growth-enhancing mutations are sometimes associated with tumors.

“Most changes will not compromise the safety of the cells for therapy, but we need to monitor the cultures so that we know what sorts of changes take place,” said Ibon Garitaonandia, who is a postdoctoral research fellow in Loring’s laboratory at SRI.

New research from Loring’s group has shown how particular culture conditions can reduce the likelihood of mutations. Loring and her colleagues tested several different types of surfaces upon which the cells were grown. They also used different ways of propagating or “passaging” the cultures. When cells are grown in culture, the culture dishes must be scraped to get the cells off them and then the cells must be transferred to a fresh culture dish. How you do this matters: do you use enzymes to detach the cells, or do you mechanically scrape them off? Other culture techniques use layers of “feeder cells” that do not divide, but are still able to secrete growth factors that improve the health of the growing stem cells.

Loring and her crew tested various combinations of surfaces, passaging methods and feeder cell populations and grew the cells for three years with over 100 passages. Over the course of this experiment, the cells were sampled and analyzed for the presence of new mutations in their genomes.

It turns out that stem cells grown on feeder cells that are passaged by hand (manually) show the fewest growth-enhancing mutations after being cultured for three years.

Loring’s study also demonstrated the importance of monitoring cell lines over time. In particular, deletion of the TP53 gene, a tumor suppressor gene, in whose absence cancer develops, should be closely watched.

“If you want to preserve the integrity of the genome, then grow your cells under those conditions with feeder cells and manual passaging,” said Loring. “Also, analyze your cells. It’s really easy, she added.

When Thomson made the first human ESC lines, he used feeder cells derived from mouse skin cells.  However, the use of animal materials to make ESCs might pollute them with animal viruses and specific sugars from the surfaces of the animal cells might also contaminate the surfaces of the ESCs, making them unsuitable for regenerative medicine (see Stem Cells 2006; 24:221-229).  To address this problem, several laboratories have made “Xeno-free” ESC lines that were made without touching any animal products.  Some of these Xeno-free lines were made without feeder cells (see C. Ellerström, et al., Stem Cells. 2006 Oct;24(10):2170-6)., but others were made with human feeder cell lines (see K Rajala, et al., Hum Reprod. 2007 May;22(5):1231-8). Therefore, it appears, that the use of human feeder cell lines are preferable to feeder-free systems, given Loring’s findings.  However, it is also possible that such culture systems are also preferable for iPSCs, which do not have the problem of immunological rejection for patients, and do not require the killing of the youngest members of humanity.  Therefore, Loring’s work could very well benefit iPSC cultures as well.

Long-term Tumorgenicity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells


A paper from the Okano laboratory has shown that implantation of neural stem cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells can still form tumors ever after a long period of time.

This paper is an important contribution to the safety issues surrounding induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). As noted in previous posts, iPSCs are made from adult cells by means of genetic engineering and cell culture techniques. In short, by introducing four different genes into adult cells and then culturing them in a special culture medium, a fraction of these cells will de-differentiate into cells that resemble embryonic stem cells in many ways, but are not exactly like them.

The Okano laboratory made iPSCs using viruses that integrate into the genome of the host cell, which is not the safest option. However, because in the four-gene cocktail that is normally used to reprogram these cells (Oct-4, Klf-4, Sox2, and c-Myc), the c-Myc gene is often thought to be the main cause of tumor formation. Okano and his collaborators made their iPSCs without the c-Myc gene, but only used the three-gene cocktail of Oct-4, Klf-4, and Sox2. Such a cocktail is much less efficient that the four-gene cocktail, but it supposed to make iPSCs that are altogether safer.

These iPSCs were differentiated into neural stem cells that grew as tiny spheres of cells, and these “neurospheres” were transplanted into the spinal cords of mice that had suffered a spinal cord injury. The implanted cells differentiated into neurons and glial cells and restored some neural function to these mice. However, the mice were observed for a long period of time after the implantations to assess the long-term safety of these implanted cells.

After 105 days, the implanted mice began to show deterioration of their neural function and their spinal cords showed tumors. It is clear that the Oct-4 gene that was used in the reprogramming procedure was the reason for the tumor transformation.

Graphical Abstract 20141213

This experiment, once again, calls into question the safety of any method for iPSC generation that leaves the transfected genes in the reprogrammed cells. I reported in a previous post that skin cells made from iPSCs that had their transgenes left in them were good at causing tumors and not as good as forming skin cells, but iPSCs without their reprogramming transgenes were safer and more effective tools for regenerative medicine.  This experiment also shows that c-Myc is not the only concern with iPSCs.  Any of the transgenes used for reprogramming can cause problems, and they must be removed if iPSCs are going to produce safe, differentiated cells.  Finally, this experiment pretty much shows that the use of retrovirus tools to introduce genes into cells for the sake of reprogramming is a bad idea if those cells are going to be used for regenerative medicine.  Non-integrating tools are much safer and preferable in these cases.

The Okano paper appeared in Stem Cell Reports.