Prostaglandin E Switches Endoderm Cells From Pancreas to Liver


The gastrointestinal tract initially forms as a tube inside the embryo. Accessory digestive organs sprout from this tube in response to inductive signals from the surrounding mesoderm. Both the pancreas and the liver form at about the same time (4th week after fertilization) and at about the same place in the embryonic gut (the junction between the foregut and the midgut).

Pancreatic development

The pancreas forms as ventral and dorsal outgrowths that eventually fuse together when the gut rotates. The liver forms from the “hepatic diverticulum” that grows from the gut about 23-26 days after fertilization. These liver bud cells work with surrounding tissues to form the liver.

Liver development

What determines whether an endodermal cell becomes a liver or pancreatic precursor cell?

Wolfram Goessling and Trista North from the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have identified a gradient of the molecule prostaglandin E (PGE) in zebrafish embryos that acts as a liver/pancreas switch.

Postdoctoral researcher Sahar Nissim in the Goessling laboratory has uncovered how PGE toggles endodermal cells between the liver-pancreas fate. Nissim has shown that endodermal cells exposed to more PGE become liver cells and those exposed to less PGE become pancreas. This is the first time that prostaglandins have been reported as the factor that can switch cell identities from one fate to another.

After completing these experiments, HSCI scientists collaborated with colleague Richard Mass to determine if their PGE-mediated cell fate switch also occurred in mammals. Here again, Richard Sherwood from the Mass established that mouse endodermal cells became liver if exposed to PGE and pancreas if exposed to less PGE.  Sherwood also demonstrated that PGE enhanced liver growth and regeneration.

Goessling become interested in PGE in 2005, when a chemical screen identified PGE as an agent that amplified blood stem cell populations in zebrafish embryos. Goessling that transitioned this work to human patients, and a phase 1b clinical trial that uses PGE to increase umbilical cord blood transplants has just been completed.

PGE might be useful for instructing pluripotent human stem cells that have been differentiated into endodermal cells to form completely functional, mature liver cells that can be used to treatment patients with liver disease.

When Is the Best Time to Treat Heart Attack Patients With Stem Cells?


Several preclinical trials in laboratory animals and clinical trials have definitively demonstrated the efficacy of stem cell treatments after a heart attack. However, these same studies have left several question largely unresolved. For example, when is the best time to treat acute heart attack patients? What is the appropriate stem cell dose? What is the best way to administer these stem cells? Is it better to use a patient’s own stem cells or stem cells from someone else?

A recent clinical trial from Soochow University in Suzhou, China has addressed the question of when to treat heart attack patients. Published in the Life Sciences section of the journal Science China, Yi Huan Chen and Xiao Mei Teng and their colleagues in the laboratory of Zen Ya Shen administered bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells at different times after a heart attack. Their study also examined the effects of mesenchymal stem cells transplants at different times after a heart attack in Taihu Meishan pigs. This combination of preclinical and clinical studies makes this paper a very powerful piece of research indeed.

The results of the clinical trial came from 42 heart attack patients who were treated 3 hours after suffering a heart attack, or 1 day, 3 days, 2 weeks or 4 weeks after a heart attack. The patients were evaluated with echocardiogram to ascertain heart function and magnetic resonance imaging of the heart to determine the size of the heart scar, the thickness of the heart wall, and the amount of blood pumped per heart beat (stroke volume).

When the data were complied and analyzed, patients who received their stem cell transplants 2-4 weeks after their heart attacks fared better than the other groups. The heart function improved substantially and the size of the infarct shrank the most. 4 weeks was better than 2 weeks,

The animal studies showed very similar results.

Eight patients were selected to receive additional stem cell transplants. These patients showed even greater improvements in heart function (ejection fraction improved to an average of 51.9% s opposed to 39.3% for the controls).

These results show that 2-4 weeks constitutes the optimal window for stem cell transplantation. If the transplant is given too early, then the environment of he heart is simply too hostile to support the survival of the stem cells. However, if the transplant is performed too late, the heart has already experiences a large amount of cell death, and a stem cell treatment might be superfluous. Instead 2-4 weeks appears to be the “sweet spot” when the heart is hospitable enough to support the survival of the transplanted stem cells and benefit from their healing properties. Also, this paper shows that multiple stem cell transplants a two different times to convey additional benefits, and should be considered under certain conditions.

Stem Cell-based Baldness Cure One Step Closer


Scientists might be able to offer people with less that optimal amounts of hair new hope when it comes to reversing baldness. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania say they’ve moved closer to using stem cells to treat thinning hair — at least in mice.

This group said that the use of stem cells to regenerate missing or dying hair follicles is considered a potential way to reverse hair loss. However, the technology did not exist to generate adequate numbers of hair-follicle-generating stem cells.

But new findings indicate that this may now be achievable. “This is the first time anyone has made scalable amounts of epithelial stem cells that are capable of generating the epithelial component of hair follicles,” Dr. Xiaowei Xu, an associate professor of dermatology at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, said in a university news release.

According to Xu, those cells have many potential applications that extend to wound healing, cosmetics and hair regeneration.

In their new study, Xu’s team converted induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) – reprogrammed adult stem cells with many of the characteristics of embryonic stem cells – into epithelial stem cells. This is the first time this has been done in either mice or people.

The epithelial stem cells were mixed with certain other cells and implanted into mice. They produced the outermost layers of the skin and hair follicles that are similar to human hair follicles. This study was published in the Jan. 28 edition of the journal Nature Communications.

This suggests that these cells might eventually help regenerate hair in people.

Xu said this achievement with iPSC-derived epithelial stem cells does not mean that a treatment for baldness is around the corner. Hair follicles contain both epithelial cells and a second type of adult cells called dermal papillae.

“When a person loses hair, they lose both types of cells,” Xu said. “We have solved one major problem — the epithelial component of the hair follicle. We need to figure out a way to also make new dermal papillae cells, and no one has figured that part out yet.”

Experts also note that studies conducted in animals often fail when tested in humans.

Regenerating Injured Kidneys with Exosomes from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells


Zhou Y, Xu H, Xu W, Wang B, Wu H, Tao Y, Zhang B, Wang M, Mao F, Yan Y, Gao S, Gu H, Zhu W, Qian H: Exosomes released by human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells protect against cisplatin-induced renal oxidative stress and apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Stem Cell Res Ther 2013, 4:34.

Ying Zhou and colleagues from Jiangsi University have provided helpful insights into how adult stem cell populations – in particular, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human umbilical cord (hucMSCs) – are able to regulate tissue repair and regeneration. Adult stem cells, including MSCs from different sources, confer regenerative effects in animal models of disease and tissue injury. Many of these cells are also in phase I and II trials for limb ischemia, congestive heart failure, and acute myocardial infarction (Syed BA, Evans JB. Nat Rev Drug Discov 2013, 12:185–186).

Despite the documented healing capabilities of MSCs, in many cases, even though the implanted stem cells produce genuine, reproducible therapeutic effects, the presence of the transplanted stem cells in the regenerating tissue is not observed. These observations suggest that the predominant therapeutic effect of stem cells is conferred through the release of therapeutic factors. In fact, conditioned media from adult stem cell populations are able to improve ischemic damage to kidney and heart, which confirms the presence of factors released by stem cells in mediating tissue regeneration after injury (van Koppen A, et al., PLoS One 2012, 7:e38746; Timmers L, et al., Stem Cell Res 2007, 1:129–137). Additionally, the secretion of factors such as interleukin-10 (IL-10), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated gene/protein 6 (TSG-6) has been implicated in conferring the anti-inflammatory effects of stem cells (Pittenger M: Cell Stem Cell 2009, 5:8–10). These observations cohere with the positive clinical effects of MSCs in treating Crohn’s disease and graft-versus-host disease (Caplan AI, Correa D. Cell Stem Cell 2011, 9:11–15).

Another stem cell population called muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells, which are related to MSCs, can also extend the life span of mice that have the equivalent of an aging disease called progeria. These muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells work through a paracrine mechanism (i.e. the release of locally acting substances from cells; see Lavasani M, et al., Nat Commun 2012, 3:608). However, it is unclear what factors released by functional stem cells are important for facilitating tissue regeneration after injury, disease, or aging and the precise mechanism through which these factors exert their effects. Recently, several groups have demonstrated the potent therapeutic activity of small vesicles called exosomes that are released by stem cells (Gatti S, et al., Nephrol Dial Transplant 2011, 26:1474–1483; Bruno S, et al., PLoS One 2012, 7:e33115; Lai RC, et al., Regen Med 2013, 8:197–209; Lee C, et al., Circulation 2012, 126:2601–2611; Li T, et al., Stem Cells Dev 2013, 22:845–854). Exosomes are a type of membrane vesicle with a diameter of 30 to 100 nm released by most cell types, including stem cells. They are formed by the inverse budding of the multivesicular bodies and are released from cells upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell membrane (Stoorvogel W, et al., Traffic 2002, 3:321–330).

Exosomes are distinct from larger vesicles, termed ectosomes, which are released by shedding from the cell membrane. The protein content of exosomes depends on the cells that release them, but they tend to be enriched in certain molecules, including adhesion molecules, membrane trafficking molecules, cytoskeleton molecules, heat-shock proteins, cytoplasmic enzymes, and signal transduction proteins. Importantly, exosomes also contain functional mRNA and microRNA molecules. The role of exosomes in vivo is hypothesized to be for cell-to-cell communication, transferring proteins and RNAs between cells both locally and at a distance.

To examine the regenerative effects of MSCs derived from human umbilical cord, Zhou and colleagues used a rat model of acute kidney toxicity induced by treatment with the anti-cancer drug cisplatin. After treatment with cisplatin, rats show increases in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels (a sign of kidney dysfunction) and increases in apoptosis, necrosis, and oxidative stress in the kidney. If exosomes purified from hucMSCs, termed hucMSC-ex are injected underneath the renal capsule into the kidney, these indices of acute kidney injury decrease. In cell culture, huc-MSC-exs promote proliferation of rat renal tubular epithelial cells in culture. These results suggest that hucMSC-exs can reduce oxidative stress and programmed cell death, and promote proliferation. What is not clear is how these exosomes pull this off. Zhou and colleagues provide evidence that hucMSC-ex can reduce levels of the pro-death protein Bax and increase the pro-survival Bcl-2 protein levels in the kidney to increase cell survival and stimulate Erk1/2 to increase cell proliferation.

Another research group has reported roles for miRNAs and antioxidant proteins contained in stem cell-derived exosomes for repair of damaged renal and cardiac tissue (Cantaluppi V, et al., Kidney Int 2012, 82:412–427). In addition, MSC exosome-mediated delivery of glycolytic enzymes (the pathway that degrades sugar) to complement the ATP deficit in ischemic tissues was recently reported to play an important role in repairing the ischemic heart (Lai RC, et al., Stem Cell Res 2010, 4:214–222). Clearly, stem cell exosomes contain many factors, including proteins and microRNAs that can contribute to improving the pathology of damaged tissues.

The significance of the results of Zhou and colleagues and others is that stem cells may not need to be used clinically to treat diseased or injured tissue directly. Instead, exosomes released from the stem cells, which can be rapidly isolated by centrifugation, could be administered easily without the safety concerns of aberrant stem cell differentiation, transformation, or recognition by the immune system. Also, given that human umbilical cord exosomes are therapeutic in a rat model of acute kidney injury, it is likely that stem cell exosomes from a donor (allogeneic exosomes) would be effective in clinical studies without side effects.

These are fabulously interesting results, but Zhou and colleagues have also succeeded in raising several important questions. For example: What are the key pathways targeted by stem cell exosomes to regenerate injured renal and cardiac tissue? Are other tissues as susceptible to the therapeutic effects of stem cell exosomes? Do all stem cells release similar therapeutic vesicles, or do certain stem cells release vesicles targeting only specific tissue and regulate tissue-specific pathways? How can the therapeutic activity of stem cell exosomes be increased? What is the best source of therapeutic stem cell exosomes?

Despite these important remaining questions, the demonstration that hucMSCderived exosomes block oxidative stress, prevent cell death, and increase cell proliferation in the kidney makes stem cell-derived exosomes an attractive therapeutic alternative to stem cell transplantation.

See Dorronsoro and Robbins: Regenerating the injured kidney with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes. Stem Cell Research & Therapy 2013 4:39.