Mesenchymal Stem Cells Make Blood Vessel Cells and Improve Wound Healing


Mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord have the ability to differentiate into cartilage cells, fat cells, bone cells, and blood vessels cells. These cells also are poorly recognized by the immune system of the patient and are at a low risk of being rejected by the patient’s immune system.

Valeria Aguilera and her colleagues from the laboratory of Claudio AguayoWe at the University of Concepción, Chilee have evaluated the use of mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord in the formation of new blood vessels in damaged tissues. Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells of hWMSCs were used to potentially accelerate tissue repair in living animals.

Aguilera and her co-workers began by isolating mesenchymal stem cells from human Wharton’s jelly (a connective tissue in umbilical cord). Then they grew these cells in culture for 14 or 30 days. Interestingly, the longer the WMSCs grew in culture, the more they looked like blood vessel cells. They began to express blood vessel-specific genes and proteins. WMSCs cultured for 30 days were even more like blood vessels than those grown in culture for 14 days.

When these cells were injected in the mice with damaged skin, the results showed that the WMSCs cultured for 30 days significantly accelerated wound healing compared with animals injected with either undifferentiated hWMSCs or with no cells.

Effect of hWMSCs and endothelial-differentiated hWMSC transplantation in a wound-healing model. A) Representative images of wounds at day 1 (top panels) and 12 (lower panels) after injury and subcutaneous injection of hWMSCs, hWMSC trans-differentiated into endothelial cells for 14 days (hWMSC-End14d) or 30 days (hWMSC-End30d), or control (PBS). B) Wound healing quantified in PBS (○), hWMSC (•), hWMSC-End14d (□) or hWMSC-End30d (▪) treated mice (n = 5 independent experiments, in duplicate). Values are expressed as mean±S.E.M, +P<0.05 in hWMSC-End30d v/s hWMSC, hWMSC-End14d, at the corresponding time; **P<0.03 in hWMSC-End30d v/s PBS; *P<0.001 in hWMSC-End30d v/s PBS; # P<0.01 in hWMSC-End30d v/s PBS.
Effect of hWMSCs and endothelial-differentiated hWMSC transplantation in a wound-healing model.
A) Representative images of wounds at day 1 (top panels) and 12 (lower panels) after injury and subcutaneous injection of hWMSCs, hWMSC trans-differentiated into endothelial cells for 14 days (hWMSC-End14d) or 30 days (hWMSC-End30d), or control (PBS). B) Wound healing quantified in PBS (○), hWMSC (•), hWMSC-End14d (□) or hWMSC-End30d (▪) treated mice (n = 5 independent experiments, in duplicate). Values are expressed as mean±S.E.M, +P

 

 

The wounds of mice treated with the WMSCs cultured for 30 days looked healthier, but they had many more blood vessels.

Histologic analysis of wounds in the wound-healing model. A) Representative photographs of wounds (hematoxilin/eosin staining) 12 days after injury and subcutaneous injection of PBS, hWMSCs, hWMSC-End14d or hWMSC-End30d. Quantification of histological images, for blood vessels area (B) and histological score (C) for each group of mice. Values are mean ± S.E.M (n = 5 independent experiments, in duplicate), *P<0.001 in hWMSC-End30d or hWMSC-End14d v/s MSC; +P<0.05 in hWMSC-End30d or hWMSC-End14d v/s hWMSC. Magnification x40 (-). Ep, epidermis; D, dermis; H, hypodermis.
Histologic analysis of wounds in the wound-healing model.
A) Representative photographs of wounds (hematoxilin/eosin staining) 12 days after injury and subcutaneous injection of PBS, hWMSCs, hWMSC-End14d or hWMSC-End30d. Quantification of histological images, for blood vessels area (B) and histological score (C) for each group of mice. Values are mean ± S.E.M (n = 5 independent experiments, in duplicate), *P

When laboratory animals received the culture medium from the WMSCs cultured for 30-days also showed significant acceleration of their healing, which suggests that these cells secrete a host of healing molecules that induced the formation of new blood vessels.  One might also conclude that the implanted WMSCs did not contribute to the formation of new blood vessels, but simply directed the formation of new blood vessels by secreting healing molecules.  However, when WMSCs were detected in the healed tissue, they were predominantly found in the walls of new blood vessels.

Immunohistochemical detection of human mesenchymal cells in a wound-healing model. A. Immunohistochemical staining of human mitochondria was performed in permeabilized tissue sections obtained after 12 days of subcutaneous injection of PBS, hWMSCs, hWMSC-End14d or hWMSC-End30d in mice. Cell nuclei were stained with hematoxyline. In B. Number of positive cells per vessel. Representative images of 5 independent experiments, in duplicate. Magnification x40 and insert 100x. Bars 50 µm.
Immunohistochemical detection of human mesenchymal cells in a wound-healing model.
A. Immunohistochemical staining of human mitochondria was performed in permeabilized tissue sections obtained after 12 days of subcutaneous injection of PBS, hWMSCs, hWMSC-End14d or hWMSC-End30d in mice. Cell nuclei were stained with hematoxyline. In B. Number of positive cells per vessel. Representative images of 5 independent experiments, in duplicate. Magnification x40 and insert 100x. Bars 50 µm.

These results, which were published in PLOS ONE, demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cells isolated from umbilical cord connective tissue or Wharton’s jelly can be successfully grown in culture in the laboratory and trans-differentiated into blood vessels-forming cells (endothelial cells).  These differentiated hWMSC-derived endothelial cells seem to promote the formation of new networks of blood vessels, which augments tissue repair in laboratory animals through the secretion of soluble pro-blood vessel-making molecules and, occasionally, by contributing to the formation of new vessels, themselves.

A Faster Way to Make Blood Vessels


Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson and Michael Olausson from the Sahlgrenska Academy have designed a new way to make blood vessels that takes only seven days and a few tablespoons of blood.

Thanks to their new procedure, the ability to make new tissues from stem cells has taken a huge stride forward. Three years ago, a patient at Sahlgrenska University Hospital received a blood vessel transplant grown from her own stem cells. Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson, Professor of Transplantation Biology at Sahlgrenska Academy, and Michael Olausson, Surgeon/Medical Director of the Transplant Center and Professor at Sahlgrenska Academy, came up with the idea, planned and carried out the procedure.

Now Sumitran-Holgersson and Olausson have published a new study in the journal EBioMedicine based on two other transplants that were performed in 2012 at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. The patients in this procedure were two young children who were afflicted with the same condition as in the first patient. All three patients were missing the vein that goes from the gastrointestinal tract to the liver.

“Once again we used the stem cells of the patients to grow a new blood vessel that would permit the two organs to collaborate properly,” Professor Olausson says.  This time, however, Sumitran-Holgersson, found a way to extract stem cells that did not necessitate taking them from the bone marrow. “Drilling in the bone marrow is very painful,” she says. “It occurred to me that there must be a way to obtain the cells from the blood instead.”

The extreme youth of these patients motivated Sumitran-Holgersson find a new way to extract these stem cells. She came upon the extraction of stem cells from 25 millilitres (approximately 2 tablespoons) of blood, which is the minimum quantity of blood needed to obtain enough stem cells.

Then they used a novel technique to generate transplantable vascular grafts by using decellularized allogeneic vascular scaffolds that were then populated with peripheral whole blood and then grown in a bioreactor.  Circulating, VEGFR-2 +/CD45 + and a smaller fraction of VEGFR-2 +/CD14 + cells largely repopulated the graft to form new vessels for transplantation.

Fortunately, her idea worked out better than she could have ever expected, and worked perfectly the first time. “Not only that, but the blood itself accelerated growth of the new vein,” Professor Sumitran-Holgersson says. “The entire process took only a week, as opposed to a month in the first case. The blood contains substances that naturally promote growth.”

Olausson and Sumitran-Holgersson have treated three patients so far, two children and one adult. Two of the three patients have recovered well and have veins that are functioning normally. In the third case the child is under medical surveillance and the outcome is less certain.

The technology for creating new tissues from stem cells has taken a giant leap forward. Two tablespoons of blood are all that is needed to grow a brand new blood vessel in just seven days. This is shown in a new study from Sahlgrenska Acadedmy and Sahlgrenska University Hospital published in EBioMedicine.
The technology for creating new tissues from stem cells has taken a giant leap forward. Two tablespoons of blood are all that is needed to grow a brand new blood vessel in just seven days. This is shown in a new study from Sahlgrenska Acadedmy and Sahlgrenska University Hospital published in EBioMedicine.

These studies show that it is feasible to avoid taking painful blood marrow samples to extract stem cells for blood vessel production, and that it is equally feasible to produce those blood vessels in a matter of a week.

“We believe that this technological progress can lead to dissemination of the method for the benefit of additional groups of patients, such as those with varicose veins or myocardial infarction, who need new blood vessels,” Professor Holgersson says. “Our dream is to be able to grow complete organs as a way of overcoming the current shortage from donors.”

Human Neural Stem Cells Heal Damaged Limbs


The term “ischemia” refers to conditions under which a part of your body, organ, or tissue is deprived of oxygen. Without life-giving cells begin to die. Therefore, ischemia is usually a very bad thing.

Critical limb ischemia or CLI results when blood vessels to the legs, feet or arms are severely obstructed. The results of CLI are never pretty, and CLI remains a medical condition that presents few treatment options.

A study from a research team and the University of Bristol’s School of Clinical Sciences has used stem cells in a trial that uses laboratory mice to treat CLI. The success of this study provides a new direction and new hope for procedures that relieve symptoms and prolong the life of the limb.

Autologous stem cells treatments, or those stem treatments that utilize a patient’s own stem cells care subject to clear limitations. After collection from bone marrow, fat, or other source, the stem cells must be expanded in culture after stimulation with chemicals called cytokines. After growth in culture, the cells typically contain a collection of different types of stem cells of variable quality and potency. Also, if the patients has had a heart attack or has diabetes, then the quality and potency of their own stem cells are seriously compromised.

To circumvent this problem, Paulo Madeddu and his team at the Bristol Heart Institute have used an immortalized human neural stem cell line called CTX to treat animals who suffered from diabetes mellitus and CLI.

The CTX cell line comes from a biotechnology company called ReNeuron. This company is using this cell line in a clinical trial for stoke patients, and wants to use the CTX cell line in a clinical trial for CLI patients in the future.

When CTX cells are injected into the muscle of diabetic mice with CLI, the cells promote recovery from CLI. The CTX cells do so by promoting the growth of new blood vessels.

Madeddu said, “There are not effective drug interventions to treat CLI. The consequences are a very poor quality of life, possible major amputation and a life expectancy of less than one year from diagnosis in 50 percent of all CLI patients.”

Dr. Madeddu continued: “Our findings have shown a remarkable advancement towards more effective treatments for CLI and we have also demonstrated the importance of collaborations between universities and industry that can have a social and medical impact.”

Long-Lasting Blood Vessels Regenerated from Reprogrammed Human Cells


Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston, MA have used human induced pluripotent stem cells to make vascular precursor cells to produce functional blood vessels that lasted as long as nine months.

Rakesh Jain, director of the Steele Laboratory for Tumor Biology at MGH and his team derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from adult cells of two different groups of patients. One group of individuals were healthy and the second group had type 1 diabetes. Remember that iPSCs are derived from adult cells through the process of genetic engineering. By introducing specific genes into these adult cells, the adult cells are de-differentiated into an embryonic-like state. The embryonic-like cells can be cultured and grown into a cell line that can be differentiated into various cell types in the laboratory. These differentiated cells types can then be transplanted into laboratory animals for regenerative purposes.

“The discovery of ways to bring mature cells back to a ‘stem-like’ state that ca differentiate into many different types of tissue has brought enormous potential to the field of cell-based regenerative medicine, but the challenge of deriving functional cells from these iPSCs still remains,” said Rakesh. “our team has developed an efficient method to generate vascular precursor cells from human iPSCs and used them to create networks of engineered blood vessels in living mice.”

The ability to regenerate or repair blood vessels could be a coup for regenerative medicine. Cardiovascular disease, for example, continues to be the number one cause of death in the United States and other conditions caused by blood vessel damage (e.g., the vascular complications of diabetes) continue to cause a great deal of morbidity and mortality each year. Also, providing a blood supply to newly generated tissue remains one of the greatest barriers to building solid organs through tissue engineering.

Some studies have used iPSCs to build endothelial cells (the cells that line blood vessels), and connective tissue cells that provide structural support. These cells, unfortunately, tend to not produce long-lasting vessels once they are introduced into laboratory animals. A collaborator with Jain, Dai Fukumura, stated, “The biggest challenge we faced during the early phase of this project was establishing a reliable protocol to generate endothelial cell lines that produced great quantities or precursor cells that could generate durable blood vessels.”

Jain’s group adapted a protocol that was originally designed to derived endothelial cells from human embryonic stem cells. They isolated cells based on the presence of more than one cell surface protein that marked out vascular potential. Then they expanded this population of cells using a culture system developed with embryonic stem cells that had been differentiated into endothelial cells. Further experiments confirmed that only those iPSCs that expressed all three cell surface proteins on their surfaces had the potential to form blood vessels.

To test the capacity of those cells to generate blood vessels, they implanted them onto the surface of the brain of mice in combination with mesenchymal precursors that generate smooth muscles that surround blood vessels.

Within two weeks after transplantation, the implanted cells had formed entire networks of blood vessels with blood flowing through them that has also fused with the already existing blood vessels. These engineered blood vessels continued to function for as long as 280 days in the living animal. Implantation under the skin, however, was a different story. It took 5 times the number of cells to get them to form blood vessels and they were short-lived. This is similar to the results observed in other studies.

Because type 1 diabetes can ravage blood vessels, Jain’s team made iPSCs from patients with type 1 diabetes to determine if iPSCs from such patients would generate functional blood vessels. Similarly to the cells generated from healthy individuals, vascular precursors generated from type 1 diabetics were able to form long-lasting blood vessels. However, these same cell lines showed variability in their ability to form vascular precursors. The reason for this is uncertain.

Rekha Samuel, one of the lead authors of this paper, said “The potential applications of iPSC-generated blood vessels are broad – from repairing damaged vessels supplying the heart or brain to preventing the need to amputate limbs because of the vascular complications of diabetes. But first we need to deal with such challenges as the variability of iPSC lines and the long-term safety issues involved in the use of these cells, which are being addressed by researchers around the world. We need better ways of engineering the specific type of endothelial cell needed for specific organs and functions.”