A Patient’s Own Bone Marrow Stem Cells Defeat Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis


People infected with multidrug-resistant forms of tuberculosis could, potentially, be treated with stem cells from their own bone marrow. Even though this treatment is in the early stage of its development, the results of an early-stage trial of the technique show immense promise.

British and Swedish scientists have tested this procedure, which could introduce a new treatment strategy for the estimated 450,000 people worldwide who have multi drug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB.

This study, which was published in the medical journal, The Lancet, showed that over half of 30 drug-resistant TB patients treated with a transfusion of their own bone marrow stem cells were cured of the disease after six months.

“The results … show that the current challenges and difficulties of treating MDR-TB are not insurmountable, and they bring a unique opportunity with a fresh solution to treat hundreds of thousands of people who die unnecessarily,” said TB expert Alimuddin Zumla at University College London, who co-led the study.

TB initially infects the lungs but can rapidly spread from one person to another through coughing and sneezing. Despite its modern-day resurgence, TB is often regarded as a disease of the past. However, recently, drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the microorganism that causes TB, have spread globally, rendering standard anti-TB drug treatments obsolete.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that in Eastern Europe, Asia and South Africa 450,000 people have MDR-TB, and close to half of these cases will fail to respond to existing treatments.

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, otherwise known as the “tubercle bacillus, trigger a characteristic inflammatory response (granulomatous response) in the surrounding lung tissue that elicits tissue damage (caseation necrosis).

Bone-marrow stem cells are known to migrate to areas of lung injury and inflammation. Upon arrival, they initiate the repair of damaged tissues. Since bone marrow stem cells also they also modify the body’s immune response, they can augment the clearance of tubercle bacilli from the body. Therefore, Zumla and his colleague, Markus Maeurer from Stockholm’s Karolinska University Hospital, wanted to test bone marrow stem cell infusions in patients with MDR-TB.

In a phase 1 trial, 30 patients with either MDR or XDR TB aged between 21 and 65 who were receiving standard TB antibiotic treatment were also given an infusion of around 10 million of their own bone marrow-derived stem cells.

The cells were obtained from the patient’s own bone marrow by means of a bone marrow aspiration, and then grown into large numbers in the laboratory before being re-transfused into the same patient.

During six months of follow-up, Zumla and his team found that the infusion treatment was generally safe and well tolerated, and no serious side effects were observed. The most common non-serious side effects were high cholesterol levels, nausea, low white blood cell counts and diarrhea.

Although a phase 1 trial is primarily designed only to test a treatment’s safety, the scientists said further analyses of the results showed that 16 patients treated with stem cells were deemed cured at 18 months compared with only five of 30 TB patients not treated with their own stem cells.

Maeurer stressed that further trials with more patients and longer follow-up were needed to better establish how safe and effective the stem cell treatment was.

But if future tests were successful, he said, this could become a viable extra new treatment for patients with MDR-TB who do not respond to conventional drug treatment or for those patients with severe lung damage.

A New Way to Treat Kidney Disease and Heart Failure


St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, Ontario is the site of new research that uses bone marrow stem cells to treat chronic kidney disease and heart failure in rats.

Darren Yuen and Richard Gilbert of St. Michael’s Hospital were the first to show in 2010 that enriched stem cells improved heart and kidney functions in rats afflicted with both diseases. Their work generated concerns about the side effects of returning such stem cells to the body.

Since 2010, Yuen and Gilbert have found that enriched bone marrow stem cells secrete stromal cell–derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a chemokine that is made by ischemic tissue but is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), in culture dishes.  Injection of SDF-1α into rats has many of the same positive effects as when the stem cells themselves are injected into rats.  Even more remarkably, if a drug that inhibits the enzyme DPP-4 is given (sitagliptin) produced many improvements as well.

“We’ve shown that we can use these ‘hormones’ to replicate the beneficial effects of the stem cells in treating animals with chronic kidney disease and heart failure,” said Yuen, who practices as a nephrologist. “In our view, this is a significant advance for stem cell therapies because it gets around having to inject stem cells.”

Yuen said that they do not yet know what kind of hormone the cells are secreting, but identifying the hormone would be the first step toward the goal of developing a synthetic drug.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is much more prevalent than was once believed, with recent estimates suggesting that up to five percent of the Canadian population may be affected with this condition.

The number of people with CKD and end-stage renal failure is expected to rise as the population ages and more people develop Type 2 diabetes. People with kidney disease often develop heart disease, and many of them die from heart failure rather than kidney failure.

Wound Healing Therapy That Combines Gene and Stem Cell Therapy


Researchers from Johns Hopkins University have examined wound healing in older mice and discovered that increasing blood flow to the wound can increase the rate of wound healing. Increasing blood flow to the wound requires a combination of gene therapy and the same stem cells the body already uses to heal itself.

John W. Harmon is professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and in a presentation to the American College of Surgeons’ Surgical Club, made the case that harnessing the power of bone marrow stem cells can increase the rate at which older people heal.

As we age, our wounds do not heal as fast. However, Harmon thinks that harnessing the power of bone marrow stem cells can remedy this disparity in healing rates.

To heal burns or other wounds, stem cells from the one marrow rush into action and home to the wound where they can differentiate into blood vessels, skin, and other reparative tissues. Stem cell homing is mediated by a protein called Hypoxia-Inducible-Factor-1 (HIF-1). According to Harmon, in older patients, few of these stem cells are released from the bone marrow and there is a deficiency of HIF-1. HIF-1 was actually discovered about 15 years ago by one of Harmon’s collaborators, a Johns Hopkins scientist named Gregg J. Semenza.

HIF-1
HIF-1

Harmon’s first strategy was to boost HIF-1 levels by means of gene therapy. This simply consisted of injecting the rodents with a copy of the HIF-1 gene that yielded higher levels of HIF-1 expression.

Even though higher levels of HIF-1 improved wound healing rates, burns were another story. To accelerate burn healing, Harmon and his co-workers used bone marrow stem cells from younger mice combined with the increased levels of HIF-1. This combination of HIF-1 and bone marrow stem cells from younger mice led to accelerated healing of burns so that after 17 days, almost all the mice had completely healed burns. These animals that healed so fast showed better blood flow to the wound and more blood vessels supplying the wound.

Harmon said that while this strategy is promising, he think that a procedure that uses a patient’s own bone marrow cells would work better since such cells would have a much lower chance of being rejected by the patient’s immune system. In the meantime, HIF-1 gene therapy has been successfully used in humans with a sudden lack of blood flow to a limb (see Rajagopalan S., et al., Circulation. 2007 Mar 13;115(10):1234-43). Harmon postulated that “it’s not a stretch of the imagination to think this could someday be used in elderly people with burns or other difficult wounds.”

Adult Stem Cells to Cure Diabetes?


Type 1 diabetics must inject themselves with insulin on a daily basis in order to survive. Without these shots, they would die.

Insulin injection

In most cases, type 1 diabetics have diabetes because their immune systems have attacked their insulin-producing cells and have destroyed them. However, a recent study at the University of Missouri has revealed that the immune system-dependent damage to the pancreas in type 1 diabetics goes beyond direct damage to the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, The immune response also destroys blood vessels that feed tissues within the pancreas. This finding could provide the impetus for a cure that includes a combination of drugs and stem cells.

Habib Zaghouani and his research team at the University of Missouri School of Medicine discovered that “type 1 diabetes destroys not only insulin-producing cells but also blood vessels that support them,” explained Zaghouani. “When we realized how important the blood vessels were to insulin production, we developed a cure that combines a drug we created with adult stem cells from bone marrow. The drug stop the immune system attack, and the stem cells generate new blood vessels that help insulin-producing cells to multiply and thrive.”

Type 1 diabetes or juvenile diabetes, can lead to numerous complications, including cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, nerve damage, osteoporosis and blindness. The immune response that leads to type 1 diabetes attacks the pancreas, and in particular, the cell clusters known as the islet of Langerhans or pancreatic islets. Pancreatic islets contain several hormone-secreting cells types, but the one cell type in particular attacked by the immune system in type 1 diabetics are the insulin-secreting beta cells.

Pancreatic islets
Pancreatic islets

Destruction of the beta cells greatly decreases the body’s capability to make insulin, and without sufficient quantities of insulin, the body’s capability to take up, utilize and store sugar decelerates drastically, leading to mobilization of fats stores, the production of acid, wasting of several organs, excessive water loss, constant hunger, thirst, urination, acidosis (acidification of the blood), and eventually coma and death if left untreated.

The immune system not only destroys the beta cells, it also causes collateral damage to small blood vessels (capillaries) that carry blood to and from the pancreatic islets. This blood vessel damage led Zaghouani to examine ways to head this off at the pass and heal the resultant damage.

In previous studies, Zaghouani and others developed a drug against type 1 diabetes called Ig-GAD2. Treatment with this drug stops the immune system from attacking beta cells, but, unfortunately too few beta cells survived the onslaught from the immune system to reverse the disease. In his newest study, Zaghouani and his colleagues treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) with Ig-GAD2 and then injected bone marrow-based stem cells into the pancreas in the hope that these stem cells would differentiate into insulin-secreting beta cells.

“The combination of Ig-GAD2 and bone marrow [stem] cells did result in production of new beta cells, but not in the way we expected,” explained Zaghouani. “We thought the bone marrow [stem] cells would evolve directly into beta cells. Instead, the bone marrow cells led to growth of new blood vessels, and it was the new blood vessels that facilitated reproduction of the new beta cells. In other words, we discovered that to cure type 1 diabetes, we need to repair the blood vessels that allow the subject’s beta cells to grow and distribute insulin throughout the body.”

Zaghouani would lie to acquire a patent for his promising treatment and hopes to translate his preclinical research discovery from mice to larger animals and then to humans. In the meantime, his research continues to be funded by the National Institutes of Health and the University of Missouri.

Bioengineered Trachea Implanted into a Child


Hannah Genevieve Warren was born in 2010 in Seoul, South Korea with tracheal agenesis, which is to say that she was born without a trachea. Hannah had a tube inserted through her esophagus to her lungs that allowed her to breathe. Children with tracheal agenesis usually die in early childhood, 100% of the time. No child with this condition has ever lived past six years of life. Hannah spent the first two years of her life at the Seoul National Hospital before she was transported to Illinois for an unusual surgery.

While at the Children’s Hospital of Illinois, on April 9, 2013, Hannah had a bioengineered trachea transplanted into her body. This trachea was the result of a remarkable feat of technology called the InBreath tracheal scaffold and bioreactor system that was designed and manufactured by Harvard Bioscience, Inc. Harvard Bioscience, or HBIO, is a global developer, manufacturer and marketer of a broad range of specialized products, primarily apparatus and scientific instruments, used to advance life science research and regenerative medicine.

InBreath tracheal scaffold
InBreath tracheal scaffold

Hannah’s tracheal transplant was the first regenerated trachea transplant surgery that used a biomaterial scaffold that manufactured by the Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology (HART) Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Harvard Bioscience. HART ensured that the scaffold and bioreactor were custom-made to Hannah’s dimensions. Then the scaffold was seeded with bone marrow cells taken from Hannah’s bone marrow, and the cells were incubated in the bioreactor for two days prior to implantation. Because Hannah’s own cells were used, her body accepted the transplant without the need for immunosuppressive (anti-rejection) drugs.

InBreath Bioreactor
InBreath Bioreactor

The surgeons who participated in this landmark transplant were led by Dr. Paolo Macchiarini of Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet in Huddinge, Stockholm and Drs. Mark J. Holterman and Richard Pearl both of Children’s Hospital of Illinois. This surgery was approved by the FDA under an Investigational New Drug (IND) application submitted by Dr. Holterman.

Dr. Mark Holterman, Professor of Surgery and Pediatrics at University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, commented: “The success of this pediatric tracheal implantation would have been impossible without the Harvard Bioscience contribution. Their team of engineers applied their talent and experience to solve the difficult technical challenge of applying regenerative medicine principles in a small child.”

David Green, President of Harvard Bioscience, said: “We would like to congratulate Dr. Macchiarini, Dr. Holterman, Dr. Pearl and their colleagues for accomplishing the world’s first transplant of a regenerated trachea in a child using a synthetic scaffold and giving Hannah a chance at a normal life. We also wish Hannah a full recovery and extend our best wishes to her family.”

Hannah’s surgery is the seventh successful implant of a regenerated trachea in a human using HART technology. Prior successes included the first ever successful regenerated trachea transplant in 2008, the first successful regenerated trachea transplant using a synthetic scaffold in 2011, and the commencement of the first clinical trial of regenerated tracheas in 2012. HART has plans to commence discussions with the FDA and EU regulatory authorities in the near future regarding the clinical pathway necessary to bring this new therapeutic approach to a wider range of patients who are in need of a trachea transplant.