Making Cardiac Stem Cells That are a Notch Above the Rest


The human heart has a stem cell population all its own. This stem cell population replaces heart cells at a leisurely rate throughout the life of the heart. Unfortunately, a heart attack overwhelms this repair system, and the heart simply lacks the capacity to heal itself to beyond particular limits.

However, there is the hope that physicians will one day be able to augment the healing capacity of the heart, and a few clinical trials and several animal experiments strongly suggest that this is the possible.

A new paper by Yoshiki Sawa at and his team from Osaka University has examined a way to increase the healing capabilities of human cardiac stem cells (CSCs).

In this paper, which was published in the journal Circulation, isolated CSCs from a 12-year old patient and grown in culture. However, the cells were grown in several different types of culture conditions. The density at which cells are grown can affect their biological characteristics. Therefore, Sawa and his group plated these cells at four different densities; single, low, mid and high densities. The single, low and med density-grown cells divided faster than the cells grown as high density. Also, the cells grown at lower cell densities retained their ability to form either heart muscle or blood vessels whereas the cells grown at high densities stated to make blood vessels en mass.

When scientists from Sawa’s group examined why the cells grown at high densities turned into blood vessel cells, they discovered that these cells activated a signaling pathway called the NOTCH pathway. Activation of the NOTCH pathway turned the cells into blood vessel-making cells and slowed their growth in culture.

JCS slide template

Presumably, the faster-growing, more plastic cells would be better for regenerative treatments that the slower-growing, less plastic cells. To test this hypothesis, Sawa and others transplanted cultured CSCs grown as different densities into the hearts of rats that had suffered a recent heart attack. They are used CSCs grown at high densities, but had been treated with a drug that inhibits the NOTCH pathway.

The results were remarkable. The lower the densities at which the cells were grown, the better they repaired the heart. However, the high-density cells grown in the presence of a NOTCH inhibitor (called GSI), were just as good at repairing the heart as the cells grown at low density. While the cells grown in the presence of GSI at high density still grew slowly, they showed an enhanced capacity to induce the formation of new blood vessels in the damaged heart tissue and form new heart muscle.

In conclusion these authors state: “Therapeutic effects of CSC-transplantation for heart disease may be enhanced by reducing NOTCH signaling in CSCs.”

Repopulation of Damaged Livers With Skin-Derived Stem Cells


Patients with severe liver disease must receive a liver transplant. This major procedure requires that the patient survives major surgery and then takes anti-rejection drugs for the rest of their lives. In general, liver transplant patients tend to fair pretty well. The one-year survival rate of liver transplant patients approaches 90% (see O’Mahony and Goss, Texas Heart Institute Journal 2012 39(6): 874-875).

A potentially better way to treat liver failure patients would be to take their own liver cells, convert them into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), differentiate them into liver cells, and use these liver cells to regenerate the patient’s liver. Such a treatment would contain a patient’s own liver cells and would not require anti-rejection drugs.

Induced pluripotent stem cells or iPSCs are made from genetically-engineered adult cells that have had four specific genes (Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc) introduced into them. As a result of the heightened expression of these genes, some of the adult cells dedifferentiate and are reprogrammed into cells that resemble embryonic stem cells. Normally, this procedure is relatively inefficient, slow, and induces new mutations into the engineered cells. Also, when iPSCs are differentiated into liver cells (hepatocytes), they do not adequately proliferate after differentiation, and they also fail to properly function the way adult hepatocytes do.

New work from laboratories at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), has differentiated human hepatocytes by means of a modified technique that bypasses the pluripotency stage. These cells were then used to repopulate mouse livers.

“I really like this paper. It’s a step forward in the field,” said Alejandro Soto-Gutiérrez, assistant professor of pathology at the University of Pittsburgh, who was not involved in the work. “The concept is reprogramming, but with a shortcut, which is really cool.”

Research teams led by Holger Willenbring and Sheng Ding isolated human skin cells called fibroblasts and infected them with engineered viruses that forced the expression of three genes: OCT4, SOX2, and KLF4. These transduced cells were grown in culture in the presence of proteins called growth factors and small molecules in order to induce reprogramming of the cells into the primary embryonic germ layer known as endoderm. In the embryo, the endoderm is the inner-most layer of cells that forms the gastrointestinal tract and its associated structures (liver, pancreas, and so on). Therefore, the differentiation of adult cells into endodermal progenitor cells provides a handy way to form a cell type that readily divides and can differentiate into liver cells.

“We divert the cells on their path to pluripotency,” explained coauthor Holger Willenbring, associate professor of surgery at UCSF. “We still take advantage of what is intrinsic to reprogramming, that the cells are becoming very plastic; they’ve become flexible in what kind of cell type they can be directed towards.”

The authors called these cells induced multipotent progenitor cells (iMPCs). The iMPCs were easily differentiated into endodermal progenitor cells (iMPC-EPCs). These iMPC-EPCs were grown in culture with a cocktail of small molecules and growth factors to increase iMPC-EPC colony size while concomitantly maintain them in an endodermal state. Afterwards, Willenbring and others cultured these cells with factors and small molecules known to promote liver cell differentiation. When these iMPC-Hepatocytes (Heps) were transplanted into mice with damaged livers, the iMPC-Hep cells continued to divide at least nine months after transplantation. Furthermore, the transplanted cells matured and displayed gene expression profiles very similar to that of typical adult hepatocytes. Transplantation of iMPC-Heps also improved the survival of a mouse model of chronic liver failure about as well as did transplantation of adult hepatocytes.

“It is a breakthrough for us because it’s the first time that we’ve seen a cell that can actually repopulate a mouse’s liver,” said Willenbring. Willenbring strongly suspects that iMPCs are better able to repopulate the liver because the derivation of iMPC—rather than an iPSC—eliminates some steps along the path to generating hepatocytes. These iMPCs also possess the ability to proliferate in culture to generate sufficient quantities of cells for therapeutic purposes and, additionally, can functionally mature while retaining that proliferative ability to proliferate. Both of these features are important prerequisites for therapeutic applications, according to Willenbring.

Before this technique can enter clinical trials, more work must be done. For example: “The key to all of this is trying to generate cells that are identical to adult liver cells,” said Stephen Duncan, a professor of cell biology at Medical College of Wisconsin, who was not involved in the study. “You really need these cells to take on all of the functions of a normal liver cell.” Duncan explained that liver cells taken directly from a human adult might be able to repopulate the liver in this same mouse model at levels close to 90 percent.

Willenbring and his colleagues observed repopulation levels of 2 percent by iMPC-Heps, which is substantially better than the 0.05 percent repopulation typically accomplished by hepatocytes derived from iPSCs or embryonic stem cells. However: “As good as this is, the field will need greater levels of expansion,” said Ken Zaret of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, who did not participate in the work. “But the question is: What is limiting the proliferative capacity of the cells?”

Zaret explained that it is not yet clear whether some aspect of how the cells were programmed that differed from how they normally develop could have an impact on how well the population expands after transplantation. “There still is a ways to go [sic],” he said, “but [the authors] were able to show much better long-term repopulation with human cells in the mouse model than other groups have.”

See S. Zhu et al., “Mouse liver repopulation with hepatocytes generated from human fibroblasts,” Nature, doi:10.1038/nature13020, 2014.

New 3D Method Used to Grow Miniature Pancreas


Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with an international team of investigators, have successfully developed an innovative three-dimensional method to grow miniature pancreas from progenitor cells. The future goal of this research is to utilize this model system to fight against diabetes. This research was recently published in the journal Development.

The new method allows the cell material from mice to grow vividly in picturesque tree-like structures.
The new method allows the cell material from mice to grow vividly in picturesque tree-like structures.

The new method takes cell material from mice and grows them in vividly picturesque tree-like structures.  The cells used were mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors, and they were grown in a compound called Matrigel with accompanying cocktails of growth factors.  In vitro maintenance and expansion of these pancreatic progenitors requires active Notch and FGF signaling, and therefore, this culture system recapitulated the in vivo conditions that give rise to the pancreas in the embryo.

Professor Anne Grapin-Botton and her team at the Danish Stem Cell Centre, in collaboration with colleagues from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, have developed a three-dimensional culture method that takes pancreatic cells and vigorously expands them. This new method allows the cell material from mice to grow vividly into several distinct picturesque, tree-like structures. The method offers tremendous long-term potential in producing miniature human pancreas from human stem cells. Human miniature pancreas organoids would be valuable as models to test new drugs fast and effectively, without the use of animal models.

“The new method allows the cell material to take a three-dimensional shape enabling them to multiply more freely. It’s like a plant where you use effective fertilizer, think of the laboratory like a garden and the scientist being the gardener,” says Anne Grapin-Botton.

In culture, pancreatic cells neither thrive nor develop if they are alone. A minimum of four pancreatic cells, growing close together is required for these cells to undergo organoid development.

“We found that the cells of the pancreas develop better in a gel in three-dimensions than when they are attached and flattened at the bottom of a culture plate. Under optimal conditions, the initial clusters of a few cells have proliferated into 40,000 cells within a week. After growing a lot, they transform into cells that make either digestive enzymes or hormones like insulin and they self-organize into branched pancreatic organoids that are amazingly similar to the pancreas,” adds Anne Grapin-Botton.

The scientists used this system to discover that the cells of the pancreas are sensitive to their physical environment, and are influenced by such seemingly insignificant factors as the stiffness of the gel and contact with other cells.

An effective cellular therapy for diabetes is dependent on the production of sufficient quantities of functional beta-cells. Recent studies have enabled the production of pancreatic precursors but efforts to expand these cells and differentiate them into insulin-producing beta-cells have proved a challenge.

“We think this is an important step towards the production of cells for diabetes therapy, both to produce mini-organs for drug testing and insulin-producing cells as spare parts. We show that the pancreatic cells care not only about how you feed them but need to be grown in the right physical environment. We are now trying to adapt this method to human stem cells,” adds Anne Grapin-Botton.