Heart Muscle in Young Children May Be Capable of Regeneration


The heart of young children might possess untapped potential for regeneration, according to new research. For decades, scientists believed that after a child’s first few days of life, cardiac muscle cells did not divide. Heart growth was thought to occur by means of enlargement of muscle cells.

This view, however, has been seriously challenged in the last few years. New findings in mice that have recently been published in the journal Cell seriously question this dogma. These results have serious implications for the treatment of congenital heart disorders in humans.

Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have discovered that in 15-day old mice, cardiac muscle cells undergo a precisely timed spurt of cell division that lasts about a day. The total number of cardiac muscle cells in the heart increases by about 40% during this time when the child’s body is growing rapidly. To give you some perspective, a 15-day-old mouse is roughly comparable to a child in kindergarten, and puberty occurs at day 30-35 in mice.

This burst of cell division is driven by a surge of thyroid hormone. This suggests that thyroid hormone might be able to aid in the treatment of children with congenital heart defects. Small trials have even tested thyroid hormone in children with congenital heart defects.

These findings also have broader hints for researchers who are developing regenerative heart therapies. Activating the regenerative potential of the muscle cells themselves is a strategy that is an alternative to focusing on the heart’s stem cells, according to senior author Ahsan Husain, PhD, professor of medicine (cardiology) at Emory University School of Medicine.

“It’s not as dramatic as in fish or amphibians, but we can show that in young mice, the entire heart is capable of regeneration, not just the stem cells,” he says.

This Emory group collaborated with Robert Graham, MD, executive director of the Victor Change Cardiac Research Institute in Australia.

One test conducted by these groups was to determine how well 15-day old mice can recover from the blockage of a coronary artery. Consistent with previous research, newborn (day 2) mice showed a high level of repair after such an injury, but at day 21, endogenous heart repair was quite poor. The 15-day old mice recovered better than the day 21 mice, indicating that some repair is still possible at day 15.

This discovery was an almost accidental finding while Naqvi and Husain were investigating the role of the c-kit gene. The c-kit gene is an important marker for stem cells in cardiac muscle growth. Adult mice that lack a functional c-kit gene in the heart have more cardiac muscle cells. When do these differences appear?

“We started counting the cardiomyocyte cell numbers from birth until puberty,” Naqvi says. “It was a fascinating thing, to see the numbers increasing so sharply on one day.” According to Naqvi, c-kit-deficient and wild-type mice both have a spurt of proliferation early in life but the differences in cardiac muscle cells between the c-kit+ and c-kit- mice appear later.

“Probably, previous investigators did not see this burst of growth because they were not looking for it,” Husain says. “It occurs during a very limited time period.” Even if in humans, the proliferation of cardiac muscle cells does not take place in such a tight time period as it does in mice, the finding is still relevant for human medicine, he says. “Cardiomyocyte proliferation is happening long after the immediate postnatal period,” Husain says. “And cells that were once thought incapable of dividing are the ones doing it.”

Naqvi and Husain plan to continue to investigate the relationships between thyroid hormone, nutrition during early life, and cardiac muscle growth.

Reference: N. Naqvi et al. A Proliferative Burst during Preadolescence Establishes the Final Cardiomyocyte Number. Cell 157, 795-807, 2014.

Pure Heart Muscle Cells from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells With Molecular Beacons


Using induced pluripotent stem cells to have heart muscle cells is one of the goals of regenerative medicine. Successful cultivation of heart muscle cells from a patient’s own cells would provide material to replace dead heart muscle, and could potentially extend the life of a heart-sick patient.

Unfortunately, induced pluripotent stem cells, which are made by applying genetic engineering techniques to a patient’s own adult cells, like embryonic stem cells, will cause tumors when implanted into a living organism. To beat the problem of tumor formation, scientists must be able to efficiently isolate the cells that have properly differentiated from those cells that have not differentiated.

A new paper from a laboratory the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, have used “molecular beacons” to purify heart muscle cells from induced pluripotent stem cells, thus bringing us one step closer to a protocol that isolates pure heart muscle cells from induced pluripotent stem cells made from a patient’s own cells.

Molecular beacons are nanoscale probes that fluoresce when they bind to a cell-specific messenger RNA molecule. Because heart muscle cells express several genes that are only found in heart muscle cells, Kiwon Ban in the laboratory of Young-Sup Yoon designed heart muscle-specific molecular beacons and used them to purify heart muscle cells from cultured induced pluripotent stem cells from both mice and humans.

The molecular beacons made by this team successfully isolated heart muscle cells from an established heart muscle cell line called HL-1. Then Ban and co-workers applied these heart-specific molecular beacons to successfully isolate heart muscle cells that were made from human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells. The purity of their isolated heart muscle cells topped 99% purity.

Finally, Ban and others implanted these heart muscle cells into the hearts of laboratory mice that had suffered heart attacks. When heart muscle cells that had not been purified were used, tumors resulted. However, when heart muscle cells that had been purified with their molecular beacons were transplanted, no tumors were observed and the heart function of the mice that received them steadily increased.

Because the molecular beacons are not toxic to the cells, they are an ideal way to isolate cells that have fully differentiated to the desired cell fate away from potentially tumor-causing undifferentiated cells. in the words of Ban and his colleagues, “This purification technique in combination with cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) generated from patient-specific hiPSCs will be of great value for drug screening and disease modeling, as well as cell therapy.”

Heart Regeneration and the Heart’s Own Stem Cell Population


For years scientists were sure that the heart virtually never regenerated.

Today this view has changed, and researchers at the Max Plank Institute for Heart and Lung Research have identified a stem cell population that is responsible for heart regeneration. Human hearts, as it turns out, do constantly regenerate, but at a very slow rate.

This finding brings the possibility that it might be possible to stimulate and augment this self-healing process, especially in patients with diseases or disorders of the heart, with new treatments.

Some vertebrates have the ability to regenerate large portions of their heart. For example zebrafish and several species of amphibians have the ability to self-heal and constantly maintain the heart at maximum capacity. This situation is quite different for mammals that have a low capacity for heart regeneration. Heart muscle cells in mammals stop dividing soon after birth.

However, mammalian hearts do have a resident stem cell population these cells replace heart muscle cells throughout the life of the organism, In humans, between 1-4% of all heart muscle cells are replaced every year.

Experiments with laboratory mice have identified at heart stem cells called Sca-1 cells that replace adult heart muscle cells and are activated when the heart is damaged. Under such conditions, Sca-1 cells produce significantly more heart muscle.

Unfortunately, the proportion of Sca-1 cells in the heart is very low, and finding them has been likened to searching for a diamond at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean.

Shizuka Uchida, the project leader of this research, said, “We also faced the problem that Sca-1 is no longer available in the cells as a marker protein for stem cells after they have been changed into heart muscle cells. To prove this, we had to be inventive.”

This inventiveness came in the form of a visible protein that was made all the time in the Sca-1 cells that would continue being made even if the cells differentiated into heart muscle.

Uchida put it this way: “In this way, we were able to establish that the proportion of the heart muscle cells originating from Sca-1 stem cells increased continuously in healthy mice. Around five percent of the heart muscle cells regenerated themselves within 18 months.”

When the same measurements were taken in mice with heart disease, the number of heart muscle cells made from Sca-1 stem cells increased three-fold.

“The data show that in principle the mammalian heart is able to trigger regeneration and renewal processes. Under normal circumstances, however, these processes are not enough to ultimately repair cardiac damage,” said Thomas Braun, the principal investigator in whose laboratory this work was done.

The aim is to devise and test strategies to improve the activity and number of these stem cells and, ultimately, to strengthen and augment the heart’s self-healing powers.

A More Efficient Way to Grow Heart Muscle from Stem Cells Could Yield New Regenerative Therapies


An improved method to produce heart muscle from embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells could potentially fulfill the demand for heart disease treatments and models of testing new heart drugs. The challenging part of making heart muscle in the laboratory is the production of cells that are all the same. Otherwise their response to drugs or their transplantation into a damaged heart will be unpredictable and unreliable. Fortunately a new study published in the journal STEM CELLS Translational Medicine may provide a way to make large, homogeneous batches of heart muscle cells.

By mixing some small molecules and growth factors together, an international research team led by investigators at the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai developed a two-step system that induced embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to efficiently differentiate into ventricular heart muscle cells. This protocol was not only highly efficient but also very reproducible. It also seemed to nicely recapitulate the developmental steps of normal heart development.

“These chemically induced, ventricular-like cardiomyocytes (termed ciVCMs) exhibited the expected cardiac electrophysiological and calcium handling properties as well as the appropriate heart rate responses,” said lead investigator Ioannis Karakikes, Ph.D., of the Stanford University School Of Medicine, Cardiovascular Institute. Other members of this research team consisted of scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and the Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Consortium at the University of Hong Kong.

One of the unusual aspects of this research project was the integrated approach it took. This research group combined computational and experimental systems and by using these techniques, they showed that the use of particular small molecules modulated the Wnt pathway. Signals from the Wnt pathway pass from cell to cell and play a key role in determining whether cells differentiate into an atrial or ventricular muscle cell.

“The further clarification of the molecular mechanism(s) that underlie this kind of subtype specification is essential to improving our understanding of cardiovascular development. We may be able to regulate the commitment, proliferation and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into heart muscle cells and then harness them for therapeutic purposes,” Dr. Karakikes said.

“Most cases of heart failure are related to a deficiency of heart muscle cells in the lower chambers of the heart,” said Anthony Atala, MD, editor of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine and director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine. “An efficient, cost-effective and reproducible system for generating ventricular cardiomyocytes would be a valuable resource for cell therapies as well as drug screening.”

The Use of Synthetic Messenger RNAs Augment Heart Regeneration and Healing After a Heart Attack


A collaborative effect between researchers at Harvard University and Karolinska Institutet has shown that the application of particular factors to the heart after a heart attack can heal the heart and induce the production of new heart muscle.

Kenneth Chien, who has a dual appointment at the medical university Karolinska Institutet and Harvard University, led this research teams said this about this work: “This is the beginning of using the heart as a factory to produce growth factors for specific families of cardiovascular stem cells, and suggests that it may be possible to generate new heart parts without delivering any new cells to the heart itself.”

This study builds upon previous work by Chien and his colleagues in which the growth factor VEGFA, which is known to activate the growth of endothelial cells in the adult heart (endothelial cells line blood vessels), also serves as a switch that converts heart stem cells away from making heart muscle to forming coronary vessels in the fetal heart.

To drive the expression of VEGFA in the heart, Chien and others made synthetic messenger RNAs that encoded VEGFA and injected them into the heart cells. Injections of these synthetic VEGFA messenger RNAs produced a short burst of VEGFA.

Chien induced a heart attack in mice and then administered the synthetic VEGFA messenger RNAs to some mice and buffer to others 48 hours after the heart attacks. Chien and his crew was sure to inject the synthetic VEGFA mRNAs into the regions of the heart known to harbor the resident cardiac stem cell populations.

Not only did the VEGFA-mRNA-injected mice survive better than the other mice, but their hearts had smaller heart scars, and had clear signs of the growth of new heart muscle that had been made by the resident cardiac stem cell populations. One pulse of VEGFA had long-term benefits and those cells that would have normally made the heart scar ended up making heart muscle instead as a result of one pulse of VEGFA.

Chien said of this experiment, “This moves us very close to clinical studies to regenerate cardiovascular tissue with a single chemical agent without the need for injecting any additional cells into the heart.”

At the same time, Chien also noted that this technology is in the early stages of development. Even though these mice had their chests cracked open and their hearts injected, for human patients, the challenge is to adapt heart catheter technologies to the delivery of synthetic messenger RNAs. Also, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of this technology to humans, Chien and others will need to repeat these experiments in larger animals that serve as a better model system for the human heart than rodents. Chien’s laboratory is presently in the process of doing that.

To adapt catheter technology to deliver these reagents, Chien had co-founded a company called Moderna Therapeutics to research this problem and develop the proper platform technology for clinical use. Chien is also collaborating with the biotechnology company AstraZeneca to help expedite moving the synthetic RNA technology into a clinical setting.

Cardiac Stem Cells Offer New Hope for Treatment of Heart Failure


Scientists from the United Kingdom have, for the first time, highlighted the natural regenerative abilities of a group of stem cells that live in our hearts. This particular study shows that these cells are responsible for repairing and regenerating muscle tissue that has been damaged by a heart attack. Such damage to the heart can lead to heart failure.

There is a robust debate as to the regenerative capacity of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) in the hearts a adult human beings. While many scientists are convinced that CSCs in the hearts of newborns have good regenerative ability, many remain unconvinced that adult CSCs can do similar things (see Zaruba, M.M., et al., Circulation 121, 1992–2000 and Jesty, S.A., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 13380–13385). Nevertheless, an earlier paper showed that when introduced into heart muscle after a heart attack, CSCs will regenerate the lost heart muscle and blood vessels lost in the infarct (see Beltrami, A.P., et al., Cell 114, 763–776). Resolving this disagreement requires a different type of experiment.

In this paper, Bernardo Nadal-Ginard and colleagues from the and his collaborators at the Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology Unit at the Liverpool John Moores University in Liverpool and his collaborators from Italy used a different way to affect the heart. When heart attacks are experimentally induced in the heart of rodents, the infarcts are large and they kill off large numbers of CSCs. Therefore, Nadal-Ginard and others induced severe diffuse damage of the heart muscle that also spared the CSCs. They gave the mice a large dose of a drug called isoproterenol, which acts as a “sympathomimetic.” This is confusing science talk that simply means that the drug speeds the heart rate to the point where the heart muscle exhausts itself and then starts to die off. This treatment, however, spares the CSCs (see Ellison, G.M., et al., J. Biol. Chem. 282, 11397–11409).

When the heart muscle was damaged, the CSCs differentiated into heart muscle cells and other heart-specific cells and repaired the damage in the heart. Also, the repairing cells were in the heart and were not the result of bone marrow stem cells that migrated to the bone marrow, thus putting to rest a controversy that has lasted for some years that CSCs are the result of bone marrow stem cells that migrate to the heart.

Elimination of CSCs prevents heart repair after heart damage. If, however, these heart-based stem cells are replaced after damage, the heart repairs itself and the heart recovers its function, anatomical integrity, and cellular structure.

In other experiments, removal of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) and re-injection after a heart attack shows that the CSCs can home in and repair the damaged heart.

c-kit CSCs repair heart

Since Nadal-Ginard showed that CSCs have a capacity to home to the damaged heart, less invasive treatments might be possible and that these treatments might even prevent heart failure after a heart attack in the future.

In a healthy heart, the quantity of CSCs is sufficient to repair heart muscle tissue. However, once the heart is damaged many of the CSCs are also damaged and cannot multiply or produce new muscle tissue. In these cases it could be possible to replace damaged CSCs with new ones that have been grown in the laboratory and administered intravenously.,

These new approaches involved maintaining or increasing the activity of CSCs in order to renew heart muscle and replace old, damaged cells. This new strategy will only require intravenous administration of CSCs and not require open heart procedures that require such a long time to recover.

These findings are very promising. The nest step is a clinical trial, which is due to start early 2014 and is aimed at assessing the safety and effectiveness of CSCs for preventing and treating heart failure in humans.