A New Way to Prepare Fat-Based Stem Cells to Treat Wounds


An Italian laboratory headed by Dr. Raposio at the University of Parma has designed a simple and fast technique for preparing fat-based stem cells for use in the clinic.

Fat contains an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells with characteristics similar to those found in bone marrow, but the fat-based stem cells are easier to isolate and have been shown to be effective enhancers of wound healing.

Raposio and his colleagues used fat contributed by liposuction patients. Each patient provided about 80 cubic centimeters of fat in liposuction procedures that were collected under anesthesia. Once the cells from this fat were isolated, they were mixed with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) that had been previously collected. Mixing PRP with stem cells enhances the capabilities of the fat-based stem cells and generates a concoction called “e-PRP.”  This simple procedure that consisted of fat collection, stem cell collection and mixing the cells with PRP to make e-PRP quickly made a produce that was ready for grafting onto wounds on the skin.

Detailed analyses of the cells isolated from the fat showed that they consisted of about 50,000 fat-based mesenchymal stem cells or ASCs. They represented about 5% of all cells in the sample. The remaining cells were blood-derived cell and blood vessel-making endothelial cells.

The significance of this procedure lies in the fact that most of the protocols used to isolate stem cells from fat take about two hours and require animal-derived reagents. However, the number of ASCs isolated with this new procedure is sufficient for application to wounds without the need of expanding the cells in culture. Also, this new procedure does not require serum or animal-derived reagents, and it takes only 15 minutes.

Thus this method of ASC isolation is innovative, feasible, and represents an advance in the stem cell-based treatment of chronic wounds.

A Protein from Fat-Based Stem Cells Prevents Light-Induced Damage to the Retina


Japanese researchers from Gifu Pharmaceutical University and Gifu University have reported that a type of protein found in stem cells taken from adipose (fat) tissue can reverse and prevent age-related, light-induced retinal damage in mice. These results may lead to treatments for patients faced with permanent vision loss.

According to the work done by these two research teams led by Drs. Hideaki Hara and Kazuhiro Tsuruma, a single injection of fat-derived stem cells (ASCs) reduced the retinal damage induced by light exposure in mice. This study also discovered that when fat-derived stem cells were grown in culture with retinal cells, the stem cells prevented the retinal cells from suffering damage after exposure to hydrogen peroxide and visible light both in the culture and in the retinas of live mice.

Additionally, Hara and Tsuruma and their colleagues discovered a protein in fat-derived stem cells called “progranulin.” This protein, progranulin, seems to play a central role in protecting other cells from suffering light-induced eye damage.

In the retina, which lies at the back of the eye, excessive light exposure causes degeneration of the photoreceptor cells that respond to light. Several studies have suggested that a long-term history of exposure to light might be an important factor in the onset of age-related macular degeneration. Photoreceptor loss is the primary cause of blindness in particular eye-specific degenerative diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa.

“However, there are few effective therapeutic strategies for these diseases,” Hideaki Hara, Ph.D., R.Ph., and Kazuhiro Tsuruma, Ph.D., R.Ph.

“Recent studies have demonstrated that bone marrow-derived stem cells protect against central nervous system degeneration with limited results. Just like the bone marrow stem cells, ASCs also self-renew and have the ability to change, or differentiate, as they grow. But since they come from fat, they can be obtained more easily under local anesthesia and in large quantities.”

The fat tissue used in the study was taken from mice and processed in the laboratory to isolate the fat-based stem cells. Afterwards, those cells were tested with cultured mouse retinal cells, and they show a robust protective effect. These successes suggested to the team to test their theory on a live group of mice that had retinal damage after exposure to intense levels of light.

Five days after receiving injections of the fat-based stem cells, the animals were tested for photoreceptor degeneration and retinal dysfunction. The results showed the degeneration had been significantly inhibited.

“Progranulin was identified as a major secreted protein of ASCs, which showed protective effects against retinal damage in culture and in animal tests using mice,” Drs. Hara and Tsuruma said. “As such, it may be a potential target for the treatment of degenerative diseases of the retina such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. The ASCs reduced photoreceptor degeneration without engraftment, which is concordant with the results of previous studies using bone marrow stem cells.”

“This study, suggesting that the protein progranulin may play a pivotal role in protecting against retinal light-induced damage, points to the potential for new therapeutic approaches to degenerative diseases of the retina,” said, Anthony Atala, MD, editor of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine and director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, where this work was published.