Genetic Switch to Making More Blood-Making Stem Cells Found


A coalition of stem cell scientists, co-led in Canada by Dr. John Dick, Senior Scientist, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network (UHN) and Professor, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, and in the Netherlands by Dr. Gerald de Haan, Scientific Co-Director, European Institute for the Biology of Ageing, University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands, have uncovered a genetic switch that can potentially increase the supply of stem cells for cancer patients who need transplantation therapy to fight their disease.

Their findings were published in the journal Cell Stem Cell and constitute proof-of-concept experiments that may provide a viable new approach to making more stem cells from umbilical cord blood.

“Stem cells are rare in cord blood and often there are not enough present in a typical collection to be useful for human transplantation. The goal is to find ways to make more of them and enable more patients to make use of blood stem cell therapy,” says Dr. Dick. “Our discovery shows a method that could be harnessed over the long-term into a clinical therapy and we could take advantage of cord blood being collected in various public banks that are now growing across the country.”

Currently, all patients who require stem cell transplants must be matched to an adult donor. The donor and the recipient must share a common set of cell surface proteins called “human leukocyte antigens” HLAs. HLAs are found on the surfaces of all nucleated cells in our bodies and these proteins are encoded by a cluster of genes called the “Major Histocompatibility Complex,” (MHC) which is found on chromosome six.

Map of MHC

There are two main types of MHC genes: Class I and Class II.

MHC Functions

Class I MHC contains three genes (HLA-A, B, and C). The three proteins encoded by these genes, HLA-A, -B, & -C, are found on the surfaces of almost all cells in our bodies. The exceptions are red blood cells and platelets, which do not have nuclei. Class II MHC genes consist of HLA-DR, DQ, and DP, and the proteins encoded by these genes are exclusive found on the surfaces of immune cells called “antigen-presenting cells” (includes macrophages, dendritic cells and B cells). Antigen-presenting cells recognize foreign substances in our bodies, grab them and, if you will, hold them up for everyone to see. The cells that usually respond to antigen presentation are immune cells called “T-cells.” T-cells are equipped with an antigen receptor that only binds antigens when those antigens are complexed with HLA proteins.

If you are given cells from another person who is genetically distinct from you, the HLA proteins on the surfaces of those cells are recognized by antigen-presenting cells as foreign substances. The antigen-presenting cells will them present pieces of the foreign HLA proteins on their surfaces, and T-cells will be sensitized to those proteins. These T-cells will them attack and destroy any cells in your body that have those foreign HLA proteins. This is the basis of transplant rejection and is the main reason transplant patients must continue to take drugs that prevent their T-cells from recognizing foreign HLA proteins as foreign.

When it comes to bone marrow transplantations, patients can almost never find a donor whose HLA surface proteins match perfectly. However, if the HLA proteins of the donor are too different from those of the recipient, then the cells from the bone marrow transplant attack the recipient’s cells and destroy them. This is called “Graft versus Host Disease” (GVHD). The inability of leukemia and lymphoma and other patients to receive bone marrow transplants is the unavailability of matching bone marrow. Globally, many thousands of patients are unable to get stem cell transplants needed to combat blood cancers such as leukemia because there is no donor match.

“About 40,000 people receive stem cell transplants each year, but that represents only about one-third of the patients who require this therapy,” says Dr. Dick. “That’s why there is a big push in research to explore cord blood as a source because it is readily available and increases the opportunity to find tissue matches. The key is to expand stem cells from cord blood to make many more samples available to meet this need. And we’re making progress.”

Umbilical cord blood, however, is different from adult bone marrow. The cells in umbilical cord blood are more immature and not nearly as likely to generate GVHD. Therefore, less perfect HLA matches can be used to treat patients in need of a bone marrow transplant. Unfortunately, umbilical cord blood has the drawback of have far fewer stem cells than adult bone marrow. If the number of blood-making (hematopoietic) stem cells in umbilical cord blood can be increased, then umbilical cord blood would become even more useful from a clinical perspective.

There has been a good deal of research into expanding the number of stem cells present in cord blood, the Dick/de Haan teams took a different approach. When a stem cell divides it produces a large number of “progenitor cells” that retain key properties of being able to develop into every one of the 10 mature blood cell types. These progenitor cells, however, have lost the critical ability to self-renew.

Dick and his colleagues analyzed mouse and human models of blood development, and they discovered that a microRNA called miR-125a is a genetic switch that is on in stem cells and controls self-renewal, but gets turned off in the progenitor cells.

“Our work shows that if we artificially throw the switch on in those downstream cells, we can endow them with stemness and they basically become stem cells and can be maintained over the long-term,” says Dr. Dick.

In their paper, Dick and de Haan showed that forced expression of miR-125 increases the number of hematopoietic stem cells in a living animal. Also, miR-125 induces stem cell potential in murine and human progenitor cells, and represses, among others, targets of the MAP kinase signaling pathway, which is important in differentiation of cells away from the stem cell fate. Furthermore, since miR-125 function and targets are conserved in human and mouse, what works in mice might very well work in human patients.

graphical abstract CSC_v9

This is proof-of-concept paper – no human trials have been conducted to date, but these data may be the beginnings of making more stem cells from banked cord blood to cure a variety of blood-based conditions.

Here’s to hoping.

Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells Prevent Rejection of Transplanted Tissue


Solid organ transplantation is a procedure that has saved untold millions of lives. Unfortunately, the tendency for an organ to be rejected by the immune system of the organ recipient is a formidable problem that is addressed in two ways. One of these is through tissue matching of the organ to the recipient. The other is through the use of immunosuppressive drugs that suppress the immune system. Neither one of these strategies is without caveats.

Tissue typing begins with a blood test to determine the organ recipient’s blood type. If the organ contains a blood type that is incompatible with the immune system of the organ recipient, the result will be catastrophic. Hyperacute rejection is the name given to organ rejection that occurs minutes to hours after the organ was transplanted. Hyperacute rejection occurs because the recipient has pre-existing antibodies in their body that recognizes and begins to destroy the graft. These antibodies can result from prior blood transfusions, multiple pregnancies, prior transplantation, or xenografts against which humans already have antibodies. Massive blood clotting within the capillaries of the organ clog the blood vessels and prevent perfusion of the graft with blood. The organ must come out or the patient will die.

Human cells have on their surfaces particular proteins that are encoded by genes located on the short arm of chromosome 6 called the major histocompatibility complex or MHC. the MHC genes encode human leukocyte antigens or HLAs. HLA proteins are extremely variable from person to person, and this seems to be the case because the more variation we have in our HLA proteins, the better job the immune system does recognizing foreign invaders.

Each individual expresses MHC genes from each chromosome. Therefore, your cells contain a mosaic of surface proteins, some of which are encoded by the HLAs encoded by the chromosome you inherited from your father and others of which are encoded by the chromosome your inherited from your mother.

The MHC molecules are divided into 2 classes. Class I molecules are normally expressed on all nucleated cells, but class II molecules are expressed only on the so-called “professional antigen-presenting cells” or APCs. APCs include cells that have names like dendritic cells, activated macrophages, and B cells. T lymphocytes only recognize foreign substances when they are bound to an MHC protein. Class I molecules present antigens from within the cell, which includes bits from viruses, tumors and things like that. Class II molecules present extracellular antigens such as extracellular bacteria and so on to a subclass of T cells called T helper cells, which express a molecule called “CD4” on their cell surface.

MHC-Class-I-Topology_3mhc_class2

All this might seem very confusing, but it is vital to ensuring that the organ is properly received by the organ recipient. Some types of MHC are very different and will elicit robust immune responses against them, but others are not as different and can be rather well tolerated. How does the doctor which are which? Through three tests: 1) Blood type is the first one. If this does not match, you are out of luck; 2) lymphocytotoxicity assay in which blood from a patient is tested to determine if it reacts with lymphocytes from the blood of the donor. A positive crossmatch is a contraindication to transplantation because of the risk of hyperacute rejection. This is used mainly in kidney transplantation; 3) Panel-reactive antibody (PRA) screens in which the the serum of a patient is screened for antibodies against the lymphocytes from the donor. The presence of such antibodies is contraindicated for transplantation. Finally, there is a test that is not used a great called the mixed lymphocyte reaction test that uses lymphocytes from the blood of the organ donor and the organ recipient to see if they activate one another. This test takes a long time and can be difficult to interpret.

Once the patient receives the transplant, they are usually put on immunosuppressive drugs. These drugs include cyclosporine, tacrolimus, sirolimus, mycophenolate, and azathioprine. Each of these drugs has a boatload of side effects that range from hair loss, diabetes mellitus, nerve problems, increased risk of illness and tumors, and so on. None of these side effects are desirable, especially since the drug must be taken for the rest of your life after you receive the transplant.

Enter a new paper from University Hospital in Regensburg, Germany from the laboratory of Marc Dahkle that used particular stem cells from bone marrow to induce toleration of grafted heart tissue in laboratory animals without any drugs. This paper was published in Stem Cells Translational Medicine and is potentially landmark in what it shows.

In this paper, Dahkle and his colleagues used stem cells from the bone marrow known as multipotential adult progenitor cells or MAPCs. MAPCs have been thought to be a subtype of mesenchymal stem cell in the bone marrow because they have several cell surface markers in common. However, there are some subtle differences between these two types of cells. First of all, the MAPCs are larger than their mesenchymal stem cell counterparts. Secondly, MAPCs can be cultured more long-term, which increases the attractiveness of these cells for therapeutic purposes.

In this paper, the Dahkle group transplanted heart tissue from two unrelated strains of rats. Four days before the transplantation, the donor rats received an infusion of MAPCs into their tail veins. There were a whole slew of control rats that were used as well, but the upshot of all this is that the rats that received the MAPCs before the transplantation plus a very low dose of the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolate did not show any signs of rejection of the transplanted heart tissue. If that wasn’t enough, when the transplanted heart tissue was then extirpated and re-transplanted into another rat, those grafts that came from MAPC-treated rats survived without any drugs, but those that came from non-MAPC-treated rats did not.

Because control experiments showed that the rats treated with cyclosporine did not reject their grafts, Dahkle and others used this system to determine the mechanism by which MAPCs prevent immune rejection of the grafted tissue. They discovered that the MAPCs seem to work though a white blood cell called a macrophage. Somehow, the MAPCs signal to the macrophages to suppress rejection of the graft. If a drug (clodronate) that obliterates the macrophages was given to the rats with the MAPCs, the stem cells were unable to suppress the immunological rejection of the graft.

In this paper, the authors conclude that “When these data are taken together, our current approach advances the concept of cell-based immunomodulation in solid organ transplantation by demonstrating that third-party, adherent, adult stem cells from the bone marrow are capable of acting as a universal cell product that mediates long-term survival of fully allogeneic organ grafts.” Revolutionary is a good word for this findings of this paper.  Hopefully, further pre-clinical trials will eventually give way to clinical trials in human patients that will allow human patients to have their lives saved by an organ transplant without the curse of taking immunosuppressive drugs for the rest of their lives.