Synthetic Matrices that Induce Stem Cell-Mediated Bone Formation


Biomimetic matrices resemble living structures even though they are made from synthetic materials. Researchers in the laboratory of Shyni Varghese at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering have used calcium phosphate to direct mesenchymal stem cells to form bone. In doing so, Varghese and his colleagues have identified a surprising pathway from biomaterials to bone.

Varghese and his colleagues think that their work may point out new targets for treating bone defects, such as major fractures, and bone metabolic disorders such as osteoporosis.

The first goal of this research was to use materials to build something that looked like bone. This way, stem cells harvested from bone marrow (the squishy stuff inside our bones) could sense the presence of bone and differentiate into osteoblasts, the cells in our bodies that build bone.

“We knew for years that calcium phosphate-based materials promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, but none of use knew why.” said Varghese. “As engineers, we want to build something that is reproducible and consistent, so we need to know how building factors contribute to this end.”

Varghese and co-workers discovered that phosphate ions dissolved from calcium phosphate-based materials and these stray phosphate ions are taken up by the stem cells and used for the production of adenosine triphosphate or ATP. ATP is the energy currency of the cell, and it is the way cells store energy in a form that is readily usable for powering other reactions.

In stem cells, the generation of ATP eventually increases the intracellular concentration of the ATP breakdown product adenosine, and adenosine signals to stem cells to differentiate into osteoblasts and make bone.

Varghese said that she was surprised that “the biomaterials were connected to metabolic pathways. And we didn’t know how these metabolic pathways could influence stem cells,” and their commitment to bone formation.

These results also explain another clinical observation. Plastic surgeons have been using fat-based stem cells for eyelid lifts, breast augmentation, and other types of reconstructive surgeries. In once case, a plastic surgeon injected a dermal filler that contained calcium hydroxyapatite with the fat-based stem cells into a woman’s eyelid to provide an eye lift. However, the stem cells formed bone, and the poor lady’s lid painfully clicked every time she blinked and she had to have surgery to remove the ectopic bone. These results from Varghese’s laboratory explains why these fat-based stem cells formed bone in this case, and great care should be taken to never use such fillers in fat-based transplantation procedures.

Micro-Grooved Surfaces Influence Stem Cell Differentiation


Martin Knight and his colleagues from the Queen Mary’s School of Engineering and Materials Science and the Institute of Bioengineering in London, UK have shown that growing adult stem cells on micro-grooved surfaces disrupts a particular biochemical pathway that specified the length of a cellular structure called the “primary cilium.” Disruption of the primary cilium ultimately controls the subsequent behavior of these stem cells.

Primary cilia are about one thousand times narrower than a human hair. They are found in most cells and even though they were thought to be irrelevant at one time, this is clearly not the case.

Primary Cilium

The primary cilium acts as a sensory structure that responds to mechanical and chemical stimuli in the environment, and then communicates that external signal to the interior of the cell.  Most of the basic research on this structure was done using a single-celled alga called Chlamydomonas.

Martin Knight and his team, however, are certain that primary cilia in adult stem cells play a definite role in controlling cell differentiation.  Knight said, “Our research shows that they [primary cilia] play a key role in stem cell differentiation.  We found it’s possible to control stem cell specialization by manipulating primary cilia elongation, and that this occurs when stem cells are grown on these special grooved surfaces.”

When mesenchymal stromal cells were grown on grooved surfaces, the tension inside the cells was altered, and this remodeled the cytoskeleton of the cells.  Cytoskeleton refers to a rigid group of protein inside of cells that act as “rebar.” for the cell.  If you have ever worked with concrete, you will know that structural use of concrete requires the use of reinforcing metal bars to prevent the concrete from crumbling under the force of its own weight.  In the same way, cytoskeletal proteins reinforce the cell, give it shape, help it move, and help it resist shear forces.  Remodeling of the cytoskeleton can greatly change the behavior of the cell.

The primary cilium is important for stem cell differentiation.  Growing mesenchymal stromal cells on micro-grooved surfaces disrupts the primary cilium and prevents stem cell differentiation.  This simple culture technique can help maintain stem cells in an undifferentiated state until they have expanded enough for therapeutic purposes.

Once again we that there are ways to milk adult stem cells for all they are worth.  Destroying embryos is simply not necessary to save the lives of patients.

Frozen Stem Cells Taken from a Cadaver Five Years Ago Vigorously Grow


It is incumbent upon regenerative medicine researchers to discover non-controversial sources of stem cells that are safe and abundant. To that end, harvesting stem cells from deceased donors might represent an innovative and potentially unlimited reservoir of different stem cells.

In this present study, tissues from the blood vessels of cadavers were used as a source of human cadaver mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hC-MSCs). The scientists in this paper successfully isolated cells from arteries after the death of the patient and subjected them to cryogenic storage in a tissue-banking facility for at least 5 years.

After thawing, the hC-MSCs were re-isolated with high-efficiency (12 × 10[6]) and showed all the usual characteristics of mesenchymal stromal cells. They expressed all the proper markers, were able to differentiate into the right cell types, and showed the same immunosuppressive activity as mesenchymal stromal cells from living persons.

Thus the efficient procurement of stem cells from cadavers demonstrates that such cells can survive harsh conditions, low oxygen tensions, and freezing and dehydration. This paves the way for a scientific revolution where cadaver stromal/stem cells could effectively treat patients who need cell therapies.

See Sabrina Valente, and others, Human cadaver multipotent stromal/stem cells isolated from arteries stored in liquid nitrogen for 5 years.  Stem Cell Research & Therapy 2014, 5:8.