Pure Heart Muscle Cells from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells With Molecular Beacons


Using induced pluripotent stem cells to have heart muscle cells is one of the goals of regenerative medicine. Successful cultivation of heart muscle cells from a patient’s own cells would provide material to replace dead heart muscle, and could potentially extend the life of a heart-sick patient.

Unfortunately, induced pluripotent stem cells, which are made by applying genetic engineering techniques to a patient’s own adult cells, like embryonic stem cells, will cause tumors when implanted into a living organism. To beat the problem of tumor formation, scientists must be able to efficiently isolate the cells that have properly differentiated from those cells that have not differentiated.

A new paper from a laboratory the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, have used “molecular beacons” to purify heart muscle cells from induced pluripotent stem cells, thus bringing us one step closer to a protocol that isolates pure heart muscle cells from induced pluripotent stem cells made from a patient’s own cells.

Molecular beacons are nanoscale probes that fluoresce when they bind to a cell-specific messenger RNA molecule. Because heart muscle cells express several genes that are only found in heart muscle cells, Kiwon Ban in the laboratory of Young-Sup Yoon designed heart muscle-specific molecular beacons and used them to purify heart muscle cells from cultured induced pluripotent stem cells from both mice and humans.

The molecular beacons made by this team successfully isolated heart muscle cells from an established heart muscle cell line called HL-1. Then Ban and co-workers applied these heart-specific molecular beacons to successfully isolate heart muscle cells that were made from human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells. The purity of their isolated heart muscle cells topped 99% purity.

Finally, Ban and others implanted these heart muscle cells into the hearts of laboratory mice that had suffered heart attacks. When heart muscle cells that had not been purified were used, tumors resulted. However, when heart muscle cells that had been purified with their molecular beacons were transplanted, no tumors were observed and the heart function of the mice that received them steadily increased.

Because the molecular beacons are not toxic to the cells, they are an ideal way to isolate cells that have fully differentiated to the desired cell fate away from potentially tumor-causing undifferentiated cells. in the words of Ban and his colleagues, “This purification technique in combination with cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) generated from patient-specific hiPSCs will be of great value for drug screening and disease modeling, as well as cell therapy.”

Cardiac Muscle Repair with Molecular Beacons


Pure heart muscle cells that are ready for transplantation. This is one of the Holy Grails of regenerative medicine. Of course when working with pluripotent stem cell lines, isolating nothing but beating heart muscle cells is rather difficult. A new technique makes the isolation of pure cultures of beating heart muscle cells that much easier.

Researchers at Emory and Georgia Tech have developed a method that utilizes molecules called “molecular beacons” to isolate heart muscle cells from pluripotent stem cells. Molecular beacons fluoresce when they come into contact with cells that express certain genes. In this case, the beacons target cells that express heart-specific myosin.

Physicians can use these purified cardiac muscle cells to heal damaged areas of the heart in patient that have suffered a heart attack or are suffering heart failure. This molecular beacon technique might also have applications in other fields of regenerative medicine as well.

“Often, we want to generate a particular cell population from stem cells for introduction into patients,” said Young-sup Yoon, professor of medicine and director for stem cell biology at Emory University School of Medicine. “But the desired cells often lack a readily accessible surface marker, or that marker is not specific enough, as is the case for cardiac muscle cells. This technique could allow us to purify almost any type of cell.”

Gang Bao pioneered he use of molecular beacons and was a co-author of this publication. Yoon and is colleagues and collaborators grew mouse and human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells and differentiated them into heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes). They then used molecular beacons to label only those cells that expressed messenger RNAs with just the right sequences. These molecular beacons hybridized with the mRNAs and fluoresced. Bao and others then used flow cytometry to sort the fluorescent cells from the non- fluorescent cells. The fluorescent cells have differentiated into heart muscle cells and were isolated from all the other cells.

These purified heart muscle cells could engraft into the heart of a mouse that had suffered a heart attack and they improved heart function and formed no tumors. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that this technique is feasible.

“In previous experiments with injected bare cells, investigators at Emory and elsewhere found that a large proportion of the cells are washed away. We need to engineer the cells into compatible biomaterials to enhance engraftment and retention,” said Yoon,