Making Preneurons from White Blood Cells for ALS Patients


ALS or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a disease that results in he death of motor neurons. Motor neurons enable skeletal muscles to contract, which drives movement. The death of motor neurons robs the patient of the ability to move and ALS patients suffer a relentless, progressive, and sad decline that culminates in death from asphyxiation. Treatments are largely palliative, but stem cells treatments might delay the onset of the disease, or even regenerate the dead neurons.

To this end a Mexican group from Monterrey has used a protocol to isolate white blood cells from the circulating blood of ALS patients, and differentiate a specific population of stem cells from peripheral blood into preneurons. Although these cells were not used to treat the patients in this study, such cells do show neuroprotective features and using them in a clinical study does seem to be the next step.

In this study, CD133 cells were isolated from peripheral blood and subjected to a special culture system called a neuroinduction system. After 2-48 hours in this system, the cells showed many features that were similar to those of neurons. The cells express a cadre of neural genes (beta-tubulin III, Oligo 2, Islet-2, Nkx6.1, and Hb9). Some of the ells also grew extensions that resemble the axons of true neurons.

Interestingly, the conversion of the CD133 cells into preneurons showed similar efficiency regardless of the age, sex, or health of the individual. Even those patients with more advanced ALS had CD133 cells that differentiated into preneurons with efficiencies equal to those of their healthier counterparts. While each patient showed variation with regards to the efficiency at which their CD133 cells differentiated into preneurons, these variations could not be correlated with the age, health or sex of the patient.

The fact that these preneurons expressed Oligo2, suggests that they could differentiate into motor neurons. Therefore, even though this study was small (13 patients), it certainly shows that cells that might provide treatment possibilities for ALS patients can be made from the patient’s own blood cells.

See Maria Teresa Gonzalez-Garza et al., Differentiation of CD133+ Stem Cells from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients into Preneuron Cells. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2013;2:129-35.