Encapsulated Stem Cells to Treat Diabetes


A research group from the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute in La Jolla, San Diego, California has used pluripotent stem cells to make insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells that are encapsulated in a porous capsule from which they secrete insulin in response to rising blood glucose levels.

“Our study critically evaluates some of the potential pitfalls of using stem cells to treat insulin-dependent diabetes,” said Pamela Itkin-Ansari, an adjunct assistant professor with a joint appointment at UC San Diego. “We have shown that encapsulated hESC-derived pancreatic cells are able to produce insulin in response to elevated glucose without an increase in the mass or their escape from the capsule. This means that the encapsulated cells are both fully functional and retrievable.”

For this particular study, Itkin-Ansari and her colleagues used glowing cells to ensure that their encapsulated cells stayed in the capsule. To encapsulate the cells, this group utilized a pouch-like encapsulation device made by TheraCyte, Inc. that features a bilaminar polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane system. This pouch surrounds the cells and protects from the immune system of the host while giving cells access to nutrients and oxygen.

With respect to the cells, making insulin-secreting beta cells from embryonic stem cell lines have met with formidable challenges. Not only are beta cells differentiated from embryonic stem cells poorly functional, but upon transplantation, they tend to be fragile and poorly viable.

To circumvent this problem, encapsulation technology was tapped to protect donor cells from the ravages of the host immune system. However, an additional advance made by Itkin-Ansari and her colleagues is that when they encapsulated islet-precursor cells, derived from embryonic stem cells, these cells survived and differentiated into pancreatic beta cells. In fact, islet progenitor cells turn out to be the ideal cell type for encapsulation, since they are heartier, and differentiate into beta cells quite efficiently when encapsulated.

In their animal model tests, these cells remained encapsulated for up to 150 days. Also, as an added bonus, because the progenitor cells develop glucose responsiveness without significant changes in mass, they do not outgrow their capsules.

In order to properly get this protocol to work in humans, Itkin-Ansari and her group has to scale up the size of their capsules and the number of cells packaged into them. Another nagging question is, “How long will an implanted capsule last in a human patient?

“Given the goals and continued successful results, I expect to see the technology become a treatment option for patients with insulin-dependent diabetes,” said Itkin-Ansari.

To date, Itkin-Ansari and others have been able to successfully treat diabetic mice. The problem with these experiments is that they mice were made diabetic by treatment with a drug called beta-alloxan, which destroys the pancreatic beta cells. Human type 1 diabetic patients have an immune system that is sensitized to beta cells. Even though the encapsulation shields the beta cells from contact with the immune system, will this last in human patients with an aggressive immune response against their own beta cells? It seems to me that induced pluripotent cells made from the patient’s own cells would be a better choice in this case than an embryonic stem cell line.

Nevertheless, this is a fine piece of research for diabetic patients.

New 3D Method Used to Grow Miniature Pancreas


Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with an international team of investigators, have successfully developed an innovative three-dimensional method to grow miniature pancreas from progenitor cells. The future goal of this research is to utilize this model system to fight against diabetes. This research was recently published in the journal Development.

The new method allows the cell material from mice to grow vividly in picturesque tree-like structures.
The new method allows the cell material from mice to grow vividly in picturesque tree-like structures.

The new method takes cell material from mice and grows them in vividly picturesque tree-like structures.  The cells used were mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors, and they were grown in a compound called Matrigel with accompanying cocktails of growth factors.  In vitro maintenance and expansion of these pancreatic progenitors requires active Notch and FGF signaling, and therefore, this culture system recapitulated the in vivo conditions that give rise to the pancreas in the embryo.

Professor Anne Grapin-Botton and her team at the Danish Stem Cell Centre, in collaboration with colleagues from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, have developed a three-dimensional culture method that takes pancreatic cells and vigorously expands them. This new method allows the cell material from mice to grow vividly into several distinct picturesque, tree-like structures. The method offers tremendous long-term potential in producing miniature human pancreas from human stem cells. Human miniature pancreas organoids would be valuable as models to test new drugs fast and effectively, without the use of animal models.

“The new method allows the cell material to take a three-dimensional shape enabling them to multiply more freely. It’s like a plant where you use effective fertilizer, think of the laboratory like a garden and the scientist being the gardener,” says Anne Grapin-Botton.

In culture, pancreatic cells neither thrive nor develop if they are alone. A minimum of four pancreatic cells, growing close together is required for these cells to undergo organoid development.

“We found that the cells of the pancreas develop better in a gel in three-dimensions than when they are attached and flattened at the bottom of a culture plate. Under optimal conditions, the initial clusters of a few cells have proliferated into 40,000 cells within a week. After growing a lot, they transform into cells that make either digestive enzymes or hormones like insulin and they self-organize into branched pancreatic organoids that are amazingly similar to the pancreas,” adds Anne Grapin-Botton.

The scientists used this system to discover that the cells of the pancreas are sensitive to their physical environment, and are influenced by such seemingly insignificant factors as the stiffness of the gel and contact with other cells.

An effective cellular therapy for diabetes is dependent on the production of sufficient quantities of functional beta-cells. Recent studies have enabled the production of pancreatic precursors but efforts to expand these cells and differentiate them into insulin-producing beta-cells have proved a challenge.

“We think this is an important step towards the production of cells for diabetes therapy, both to produce mini-organs for drug testing and insulin-producing cells as spare parts. We show that the pancreatic cells care not only about how you feed them but need to be grown in the right physical environment. We are now trying to adapt this method to human stem cells,” adds Anne Grapin-Botton.