Stem Cells Aid Muscle Strengthing and Repair After Resistance Exercise


University of Illinois professor of Kinesiology and Community Health, Marni Boppart and her colleagues have published experiments that demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise. These new findings, which were published in the journal Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, might be the impetus for new medical interventions to combat age-related declines in muscle structure and function.

Marni Boppart
Marni Boppart

Injecting MSCs into mouse leg muscles before several bouts of exercise that mimic resistance training in humans and result in mild muscle damage caused increases in the rate of muscle repair and enhanced the growth and strength of those muscles in exercising mice.

“We have an interest in understanding how muscle responds to exercise, and which cellular components contribute to the increase in repair and growth with exercise,” Boppart said. “But the primary goal of our lab really is to have some understanding of how we can rejuvenate the aged muscle to prevent the physical disability that occurs with age, and to increase quality of life in general as well.”

MSCs are found throughout the body, but several studies have established that MSCs from different tissue sources have distinct biological properties. Typically, MSCs can readily differentiate into bone, fat, and cartilage cells, but coaxing MSCs to form skeletal muscle has proven to be very difficult. MSCs usually form part of the stroma, which is the connective tissue that supports organs and other tissues.

Because of their inability to readily differentiate into skeletal muscle, MSCs probably potentiate muscle repair by “paracrine” mechanisms. Paracrine mechanisms refer to molecules secreted by cells that induce responses in nearby cells. Not surprisingly, MSCs excrete a wide variety of growth factors, cytokines, and other molecules that, according to this new study, stimulate the growth of muscle precursor cells, otherwise known as “satellite cells.” The growth of satellite cells expands muscle tissue and contributes to repair following muscle injury. Once activated, satellite cells fuse with damaged muscle fibers and form new fibers to reconstruct the muscle and enhance strength and restore muscle function.

“Satellite cells are a primary target for the rejuvenation of aged muscle, since activation becomes increasingly impaired and recovery from injury is delayed over the lifespan,” Boppart said. “MSC transplantation may provide a viable solution to reawaken the aged satellite cell.”

Unfortunately, satellite cells, even though they can be isolated from muscle biopsies and grown in culture, will probably not be used therapeutically to enhance repair or strength in young or aged muscle “because they cause an immune response and rejection within the tissue,” Boppart said. But MSCs are “immunoprivileged,” which simply means that they can be transplanted from one individual to another without sparking an immune response.

“Skeletal muscle is a very complex organ that is highly innervated and vascularized, and unfortunately all of these different tissues become dysfunctional with age,” Boppart said. “Therefore, development of an intervention that can heal multiple tissues is ideally required to reverse age-related declines in muscle mass and function. MSCs, because of their ability to repair a variety of different tissue types, are perfectly suited for this task.”

Duke University Tissue Engineering Team Grows Self-Healing Muscle in Laboratory


Scientists have grown living muscle in the lab. While this is nothing new, this new advance has succeeded in making muscle that not only looks and works like genuine skeletal muscle, but also heals by itself, which is a significant advance in the field of tissue engineering.

This ultimate goal of this research is to use lab-grown muscle repair muscle damage in human patients. To date, preclinical trials have shown that lab-grown muscle properly regenerated damaged muscle in laboratory mice.

This research comes from Duke University, and the research team responsible for this work thinks that their success was due to the culture environment that they have created to grow muscle in the laboratory. Their well-developed contractile muscle fibers also contained a pool of satellite cells, which are an immature stem cell population in skeletal muscle that are activated when the muscle is damaged. Satellite cells can divide and differentiate into normal muscle tissue in order to heal muscle damage.

Cultured Muscle

Laboratory tests showed that the lab-grown muscle was as strong and good at contracting as muscle isolated from living organism. Also, the laboratory-grown muscle was able to use its satellite cell population to repair itself when the muscle was damaged with toxic chemicals.

Muscle satellite cells

When it was grafted into laboratory mice, the muscle properly integrate into the rest of the surrounding tissue and functioned beautifully when called upon to do so.

The Duke team, however, stresses that more tests must be conducted before this work can be translated into human patients.

The lead researcher for this work, Nenad Bursac, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Duke University, said: “The muscle we have made represents an important advance for the field. It’s the first time engineered muscle has been created that contracts as strongly as native neonatal [newborn] skeletal muscle.”

UK expert in skeletal muscle tissue engineering Prof Mark Lewis, from Loughborough University, said: “A number of researchers have ‘grown’ muscles in the laboratory and shown that they can behave in similar ways to that seen in the human body. However, transplantation of these grown muscles into a living creature, which continue to function as if they were native muscle has been taken to the next level by the current work.”

Tissue engineering seeks to use stem cells to fashion new organs and tissues from cultured stem cells. Tissue engineering and stem cell biology will certainly transform regenerative medicine, and in many ways it is already doing so. Scientists have already made mini-livers and kidneys in the lab using stem cells, and others are using stem cells to heal damaged heart muscles. Even though some cures and treatments are still some years away, advances continue to pile up. The future of medicine is upon us.

Making Heart Muscle from Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells


Several experiments in animals and a few clinical trials in human patients have shown that implanting skeletal muscle cells isolated from muscle biopsies into the heart after a heart attack can help the heart to some degree, but the implanted skeletal muscle cells do not integrate into the existing heart muscle mass and the skeletal muscle cells do not differentiate into heart muscle cells.

Experiments like those mentioned above utilized muscle satellite cells. Muscle satellite cells are a resident stem cell population that respond to muscle damage and divide to form skeletal muscle cells form new muscle. Satellite cells are a perfect example of a unipotent stem cell, which is to say a cell that makes one type of terminally differentiated cell type.

Skeletal muscles, however, have another cell population called muscle-derived stem cells or MDSCs. MDSCs express an entirely different set of cell surface proteins than satellite cells, and have the capacity to differentiate into skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, bone, tendon, nerve, endothelial and hematopoietic cells. MDSCs grow well in culture, tolerate low oxygen conditions quite well, and show excellent regenerative potential.

Other laboratories have managed to culture MDSCs in collagen and produce beating heart muscle cells. Others have observed MDSCs forming a proper myocardium under certain conditions. Several studies have established the ability to MDSCs to treat laboratory animals that have suffered a heart attack. The most recent work from Sekiya and others has established that cell sheets made from MDSCs can reduce dilation of the left ventricle, increased capillary density, and promoted recovery without causing erratic heat beat patterns.

Despite their obvious efficacy. MDSCs remain difficult to isolate in high enough numbers to therapeutic purposes. None of the cell surface molecules sported by MDSCs are unique to those cells. Therefore, getting clean cultures of MDSCs remains a challenge. Still, these cells represent some of the best hopes for regenerative medicine in the heart. These cells do form heart muscle cells and heal ailing hearts. They can be grown in bioreactors to high numbers and can also be combined with engineered materials to shore up a damaged heart and mediate its regeneration. While the use of MDSCs is still in its infancy, the promise certainly is there.

Using Stem Cells for Muscle Repair


Stem cell treatments for muscular dystrophy and other degenerative diseases of muscle might be a realistic possibility, since scientists have discovered protocols to make muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

Tiziano Barberi, Ph.D., chief investigator in the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI) at Monash University in Clayton, Victoria, and Bianca Borchin, a graduate student in the Barberi laboratory, have developed techniques to generate skeletal muscle cells. Barberi and Borchin isolated muscle precursor cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), after which they applied a purification technique that allows these cells to differentiate further into muscle cells.

Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), have the ability to become any cell in the human body, including skeletal muscles, which control movement. Once the stem cells begin to differentiate, controlling that process is very challenging, but essential in order to produce only the desired cells. Barberi and Borchin used a technique known as fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to identify those cells that contained the precise combination of protein markers that are expressed in muscle precursor cells. FACS also enabled them to successfully isolate those muscle precursor cells.

“There is an urgent need to find a source of muscle cells that could be used to replace the defective muscle fibers in degenerative disease. Pluripotent stem cells could be the source of these muscle cells,” Dr. Barberi said. “Beyond obtaining muscle from hPSCs, we also found a way to isolate the muscle precursor cells we generated, which is a prerequisite for their use in regenerative medicine.”

Borchin said there were existing clinical trials based on the use of specialized cells derived from hPSCs in the treatment of some degenerative diseases, but deriving muscle cells from pluripotent stem cells proved to be challenging. “These results are extremely promising because they mark a significant step towards the use of hPSCs for muscle repair,” she said.

“The production of a large number of pure muscle precursor cells does not only have potential therapeutic applications, but also provides a platform for large-scale screening of new drugs against muscle disease,” Dr. Barberi added.

This study was published early online Nov. 27 in Stem Cell Reports.  This study does not address the immune response against dystrophin that has plagued gene therapy and stem cell-based muscular dystrophy clinical trials that has been noted in previous posts.  The use of embryonic stem cells, in particular, would create muscles that are not tissue matched to the patient and would generate robust inflammation against the implanted muscles.   Thus embryonic stem cells would generate a “cure” that would be much worse than the disease itself.  Nevertheless, adapting the Barberi-Borchin protocol to induced pluripotent stem cells would produce skeletal muscle cells that are tissue matched to the patient.

Growing Skeletal Muscle in the Laboratory


Skeletal muscle – that type of voluntary muscle that allows movement – has proven difficult to grow in the laboratory. While particular cells can be differentiated into skeletal muscle cells, forming a coherent, structurally sound skeletal muscle is a tough nut to crack from a research perspective.

Another problem dogging muscle research is the difficulty growing new muscle in patients with muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophy or other types of disorders that weaken and degrade skeletal muscle.

Now research groups at the Boston Children’s Hospital Stem Cell Program have reported that they can boost the muscle mass and even reverse the disease of mice that suffer from a type of murine muscular dystrophy. To do this, this group use a combination of three different compounds that were identified in a rapid culture system.

This ingenious rapid culture system uses the cells of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to screen for these muscle-inducing compounds. These single cells are placed into the well of a 96-well plate, and then treated with various compounds to determine if those chemical induce the muscle formation. To facilitate this process, the zebrafish embryo cells express a very special marker that consists of the myosin light polypeptide 2 gene fused to a red-colored protein called “cherry.” When cells become muscle, they express the myosin light polypeptide 2 gene at high levels. Therefore, any embryo cell that differentiates into muscle should glow a red color.

(A) myf5-GFP;mylz2-mCherry double-transgenic expression recapitulates expression of the endogenous genes. myf5-GFP is first detected at the 11-somite stage. mylz2-mCherry expression is not observed until 32 hpf. Scale bars represent 200 mm. (B) myf5-GFP;mylz2-mCherry embryos were dissociated at the oblong stage and cultured in zESC medium. Images were taken 48 hr after plating. Scale bars represent 250 mm.
(A) myf5-GFP;mylz2-mCherry double-transgenic expression recapitulates expression of the endogenous genes. myf5-GFP is first detected at the 11-somite
stage. mylz2-mCherry expression is not observed until 32 hpf. Scale bars represent 200 mm.
(B) myf5-GFP;mylz2-mCherry embryos were dissociated at the oblong stage and cultured in zESC medium. Images were taken 48 hr after plating. Scale bars
represent 250 mm.

Once a cocktail of muscle-inducing chemicals were identified in this assay, those same chemicals were used to treat induced pluripotent stem cells made from cells taken from patients with muscular dystrophy.  Those iPSCs were treated with the combination of chemicals identified in the zebrafish embryo screen as muscle inducing agents.

Zebrafish embryo culture system

The results were outstanding.  Leonard Zon from the Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children’s Hospital Boston and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and his colleagues showed that a combination of basic Fibroblast Growth Factor, an  adenylyl cyclase activator called forskolin, and the GSK3β inhibitor BIO induced skeletal muscle differentiation in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).  Furthermore, these muscle cells produced engraftable myogenic progenitors that contributed to muscle repair when implanted into mice with a rodent form of muscular dystrophy.

Representative hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E) images and immunostaining on TA sections of preinjured NSG mice injected with 1 3 105 iPSCs at day 14 of differentiation. Muscles injected with BJ, 00409, or 05400 iPSC-derived cells stain positively for human d-Sarcoglycan protein (red). Fibers were counterstained with Laminin (green). No staining is observed in PBS-injected mice or when 00409 fibroblast cells were transplanted. Because the area of human cell engraftment could not be specifically distinguished on H&E stained sections, which must be processed differently from sections for immunostaining, the H&E images shown do not represent the same muscle region as that shown in immunofluorescence images. Scale bars represent 100 mm, n = 3 per sample.
Representative hematoxylin and eosin staining
(H&E) images and immunostaining on TA sections
of preinjured NSG mice injected with 1 3 105
iPSCs at day 14 of differentiation. Muscles injected
with BJ, 00409, or 05400 iPSC-derived cells
stain positively for human d-Sarcoglycan protein
(red). Fibers were counterstained with Laminin
(green). No staining is observed in PBS-injected
mice or when 00409 fibroblast cells were transplanted.
Because the area of human cell engraftment
could not be specifically distinguished on
H&E stained sections, which must be processed
differently from sections for immunostaining, the
H&E images shown do not represent the same
muscle region as that shown in immunofluorescence
images. Scale bars represent 100 mm, n = 3
per sample.

Zon hopes that clinical trials can being soon in order to translate these remarkable results into patients with muscle loss within the next several years.  Zon and his co-workers are also screening compounds to address other types of disorders beyond muscular dystrophy.

This paper represents the application of shear and utter genius.  However, there is one caveat.  The mice into which the muscles were injected were immunodeficient mice whose immune systems are unable to reject transplanted tissues.  In human patients with muscular dystrophy, an immune response against dystrophin, the defective protein, has been an enduring problem (for a review of this, see T. Okada and S. Takeda, Pharmaceuticals (Basel). 2013 Jun 27;6(7):813-836).  While there have been some technological developments that might circumvent this problem, transplanting large quantities of muscle cells might be beyond the pale.  Muscular dystrophy results from disruption of an important junction between the muscle and substratum to which the muscle is secured.  This connection is mediated by the “dystrophin-glycoprotein complex.”  Structural disruptions of this complex (shown below) lead to unanchored muscle that cannot contract properly, and eventually atrophies and degrades.

Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Molecular structure of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and related proteins superimposed on the sarcolemma and subsarcolemmal actin network (redrawn from Yoshida et al. [5], with modifications). cc, coiled-coil motif on dystrophin (Dys) and dystrobrevin (DB); SGC, sarcoglycan complex;SSPN, sarcospan; Syn, syntrophin; Cav3, caveolin-3; N and C, the N and C termini, respectively; G, G-domain of laminin; asterisk indicates the actin-binding site on the dystrophin rod domain; WW, WW domain.
Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Molecular structure of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and related proteins superimposed on the sarcolemma and subsarcolemmal actin network (redrawn from Yoshida et al. [5], with modifications). cc, coiled-coil motif on dystrophin (Dys) and dystrobrevin (DB); SGC, sarcoglycan complex;SSPN, sarcospan; Syn, syntrophin; Cav3, caveolin-3; N and C, the N and C termini, respectively; G, G-domain of laminin; asterisk indicates the actin-binding site on the dystrophin rod domain; WW, WW domain.
This is a remarkable advance, but until the host immune response issue is satisfactorily addressed, it will remain a problem.